Lord Stern has been Chair of the Grantham Research Institute since it was founded in 2008.

He also holds the following positions:

Background

Professor Stern is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at the London School of Economics. President of the British Academy, July 2013 – 2017, and was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 2014.

Professor Stern has held academic appointments in the UK at Oxford, Warwick and the LSE and abroad including at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Ecole Polytechnique and the Collège de France in Paris, the Indian Statistical Institute in Bangalore and Delhi, and the People’s University of China in Beijing.

He was Chief Economist of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 1994-1999, and Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank, 2000-2003.

He was Second Permanent Secretary to Her Majesty’s Treasury from 2003-2005; Director of Policy and Research for the Prime Minister’s Commission for Africa from 2004-2005; Head of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change, published in 2006; and Head of the Government Economic Service from 2003-2007.

He was knighted for services to economics in 2004, made a cross-bench life peer as Baron Stern of Brentford in 2007, and appointed Companion of Honour for services to economics, international relations and tackling climate change in 2017. He has published more than 15 books and 100 articles and his most recent book is “Why are We Waiting? The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change”.

Awards and Prizes

He holds 13 honorary degrees and has received the Blue Planet Prize (2009), the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award (2010), the Leontief Prize (2010), and the Schumpeter Award (2015), amongst many others.

 Research interests

  • The economics of climate change;
  • Economic development and growth;
  • Economic theory;
  • Tax reform;
  • Public policy;
  • The role of the state and economies in transition.

Contact:

General enquiries:

  • PA Eva Lee: +44 (0) 20 7852 3564
  • PA Kerrie Quirk: +44 (0) 20 7955 7871

Media requests:

  • Bob Ward, Policy & Communications Director: +44 (0) 20 7107 5413

Research - 2020

This paper (forthcoming in the Oxford Review of Economic Policy) assesses the economic and climate impact of taking a green route out of the COVID-19 crisis. The analysis is based on a survey 231 central bank officials, finance ministry officials, and other economic experts from G20 countries on the relative performance of 25 major fiscal recovery archetypes across four dimensions: speed of implementation, economic multiplier, climate impact potential, and overall desirability. Read more

Research - 2019

The authors of this comment respond to a recent argument put forward by Lemoine and Rudik (2017), that it is efficient to delay reducing carbon emissions because there is substantial inertia in the climate system. Mattauch et al. show that there is no such inertia, which means there is no lag between carbon emissions and warming. Read more

Research - 2018

Research - 2016

Research - 2015

‘To slow or not to slow’ (Nordhaus, 1991) was the first economic appraisal of greenhouse gas emissions abatement and founded a large literature on a topic of worldwide importance. We offer our assessment of the original article and trace its legacy, in particular Nordhaus's later series of ‘DICE’ models. From this work, many have drawn the conclusion that an efficient global emissions abatement policy comprises modest and modestly increasing controls. We use DICE itself to provide an initial illustration that, if the analysis is extended to take more strongly into account three essential elements of the climate problem – the endogeneity of growth, the convexity of damage and climate risk – optimal policy comprises strong controls. Read more

Research - 2014

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Policy - 2020

This paper examines the role of investment in physical, human, natural and social capital in the new phase of growth China is entering. It provides the beginnings of an analytical framework for key elements of this new growth story, examining how a focus on the four types of capital can help deliver prosperity through China’s 14th Five-Year Plan and Belt and Road Initiative. Read more

The first of two papers that offer an outline of strategies and policies for an innovative, sustainable and low-carbon approach to China’s development, this paper offers an approach that could spell out a new development strategy for the country as the 21st century progresses, to inform decision-making for China’s 14th Five-Year Plan. Read more

In advance of the Budget, this policy report highlights areas of the UK economy where the public sector could leverage private investment and in so doing contribute to achieving the strategic priorities of regionally balanced growth and decarbonisation. Read more

Policy - 2019

Economic assessments of the potential future risks of climate change have been omitting or grossly underestimating many of the most serious consequences for lives and livelihoods because these risks are difficult to quantify precisely and lie outside of human experience. This policy insight identifies and draws attention to these 'missing risks' and discusses how populations might fare in light of their potential to adapt in the face of these risks. Read more

Isabella Neuweg and Nick Stern describe the systemic reforms that could foster the investments in physical, human, natural and social capital that will drive forward China’s new era of high-quality, sustainable and inclusive growth and development. At the same time China can provide great support for its partner countries in the Belt and Road as they seek sustainable and inclusive development. Read more

Nicholas Stern contends that embarking on a path of strong, sustainable and inclusive growth can deliver the zero-carbon economy and the Sustainable Development Goals, and that such a strategy both requires, and can help create, a new internationalism. This is an extended version of a lecture by Professor Stern delivered in February 2019 at the University of Cambridge. Read more

Policy - 2018

This special report for the LSE Growth Commission shows why it is sensible for environmental sustainability to be at the heart of the UK’s growth strategy and how this can be achieved, setting out recommendations for government across the areas of innovation, infrastructure, skills and cities. Read more

Policy - 2017

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Books - 2015

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Events - 2020

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News - 2020

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