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Changing behaviour

The Changing Behaviours research group provides insight on why and how people make decisions on climate-related activities, with a view to helping researchers, policymakers and businesses identify effective interventions to promote environmentally-friendly behaviours among citizens and firms.

Researchers from this group explore the behavioural mechanisms on which policymakers and businesses can capitalize to improve the private provision of environmental goods (such as switching to environmentally friendly practices and technologies) at least cost. They aim to identify opportunities to apply behavioural and experimental economics to inform environmental policies and practices.

To this end, researchers from this group study attitudes to new business practices, different consumer behaviours, novel technologies and environmental risks. More broadly, they also explore the context of the political economy in which decisions by individuals in the public and private sector – consumers, workers and decision-makers – are made. These insights can help researchers, policymakers and businesses to identify effective interventions to promote climate-friendly decisions.

News

Rich US households produce more CO2 each year from driving than the entire carbon footprint of poor households over 8 months

Rich US households produce more CO2 each year from driving than the entire carbon footprint of poor households over 8 months

Analysis by researcher Lutz Sager puts a ‘carbon dioxide cost’ on household consumption by adding up the emissions that can be attributed to the goods, services and energy that households in the United States buy in a year and compares households with different incomes. Sager’s results show that the 10% of households with the highest income had an average annual carbon footprint of 59.4 metric tons of carbon dioxide per household in 2009 – more than three times as much as the 10% of households with the lowest income. read more »

Forthcoming events

15
Feb
2018
Climate Change, Inequality & Social Policy Seminars

Having too much: Developing a riches line

More in events »