Baran Doda was a Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment from 2011 until 2019. His research focused on the causes and consequences of anthropogenic climate change through the lens of macroeconomics.

Background

Baran completed his formal training in economics in Canada. He holds a PhD and an MA from the University of Toronto, and a BA from Simon Fraser University. He is also an alumnus of the United World College of the Adriatic, Italy. He was previously employed as an economist at the Bank of Canada, taught undergraduate economics in Canada and the UK, and worked as a freelance economics consultant.

 

Research interests

  • Climate change mitigation polices;
  • Macroeconomics of climate change;
  • Green growth.

Research - 2019

Research - 2018

Research - 2017

Research - 2016

Research - 2015

This paper is the first large scale, quantitative study of the impact of corporate carbon management practices on corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Using data for 2009 and 2010 from the Carbon Disclosure Project survey, we find little compelling evidence that commonly adopted management practices are reducing emissions. Read more

Research - 2014

CO2 emissions and GDP move together over the business cycle. Most climate change researchers would agree with this statement despite the absence of a study that formally analyzes the relationship between emissions and GDP at business cycle frequencies. The paper provides a rigorous empirical analysis of this relationship in a comprehensive cross-country panel by decomposing the emissions and GDP series into their growth and cyclical components using the HP filter. Read more

Research - 2013

Research - 2012

Policy - 2019

Policy - 2018

Policy - 2017

Policy - 2016

This submission explores whether the UK should seek to stay in or leave the EU emissions trading system (EU ETS) as part of Brexit negotiations. It finds that leaving the EU ETS would result in the UK losing access to low-cost emission reduction opportunities that are only available in what is currently the world’s largest carbon market. It also highlights that leaving the EU ETS to link with other existing or planned emissions trading systems could generate significant administrative costs that potentially offset any economic benefits. Read more

Policy - 2014

Policy - 2011

Events - 2017

Events - 2015

News - 2017

News - 2016

News - 2013

News - 2012

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