This one-day, interdisciplinary workshop will bring together philosophers, neuroscientists, experimental biologists and evolutionary biologists to discuss the origins of consciousness.

 

Space at this event is very limited. You will receive further details if you register your intention to attend on the Eventbrite page. There is no fee.

 

This is a one-day, interdisciplinary research workshop on the origins of consciousness. The workshop will focus on the following questions:

  1. What can the neuroscience of consciousness tell us about its evolutionary history?
  2. How many times has consciousness evolved? Is it a uniquely human phenomenon, or do we share it with other mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, or even invertebrates?
  3. What is the evolutionary function of consciousness, and why did it first evolve?

 

The aim is to bring together philosophers, neuroscientists, experimental biologists and evolutionary biologists to discuss these questions and set out directions for further work. The speakers and titles are:

Professor Bjoern Brembs (University of Regensburg): “The Neurogenetics of Creative Problem Solving”

Professor Lars Chittka (Queen Mary, University of London): “Invertebrate Unconsciousness?”

Professor Robert Elwood (Queen’s University Belfast): “Do Invertebrate Responses to Noxious Stimuli Offer Insights into Pain and Sentience?”

Professor Chris Frith (University College London): “What’s the Use of Consciousness?”

Professor Eva Jablonka (Tel Aviv University): “Learning and Minimal Consciousness: An Evolutionary Connection?”

Professor David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

 

In the evening there will be a public panel event. Everyone is welcome and space is much less limited (but arrive early to avoid disappointment). The public event is advertised separately here.