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Events

Programme

2021/22

The Department of International History hosts numerous lectures, roundtables, debates and workshops by our academics, visiting academics and others. Members of the Department are also involved in a series of events around LSE. Below is a list of these events by chronological order. Our events are usually free and open to all with exceptions duly noted. We make video and audio recordings available whenever possible.

Lent Term 2022

15 February 2022, Elites and Middle Classes: Rethinking Class Struggles in Cold War Latin America

Lopez-Pedreros

15 February 2022, Thursday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Co-organised with LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre

Seminar Series, First Talk: Elites and Middle Classes: Rethinking Class Struggles in Cold War Latin America

Speaker: Professor Ricardo López-Pedreros (UCL)
Chair: Dr Anna Cant (LSE International History)

The first in a series of three talks on the subject of capitalism and class in the history of the Americas. The last decade has seen the publication of important scholarship from different disciplines on the making of the middle classes across the world. Professor López-Pedreros will bring together some of the arguments put forward by scholars to open up a critical interdisciplinary conversation on how to rethink the historical formation of the middle classes—as a social category, a political project, a subjectivity, and a material reality—in Latin America during the second half of the twentieth century.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  research cluster.

9 March 2022, Iran-Africa Connections in the Late Pahlavi Period

steele

9 March 2022, Wednesday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Public Lecture: Iran-Africa Connections in the Late Pahlavi Period

Speaker: Dr Robert Steele (pictured, LSE International History)
Chair: Professor Piers Ludlow (LSE International History)

In this lecture, Dr Robert Steele will discuss his current book project on Iran’s political and cultural connections with Africa in the 1960s and 70s, with a particular focus on the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. 

Sponsored by the department's Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research cluster.


Past events


2021

Workshoppping-your-PhD-application-Header

10 December 2021, Friday, 1pm-2pm, Hybrid (Graham Wallace Room on campus and Zoom)

PhD Open Event: Workshopping Your PhD Application

Speaker: Dr Tanya Harmer (LSE International History)

Are you considering doing a PhD next year? We addressed these questions in this hybrid event with Programme Director and Admissions Advisor Dr Tanya Harmer on how, when and why to apply to the PhD programme offered by the Department.

Listen to the podcast.



Carol-Anderson-200x200

9 December 2021, Thursday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Co-organised with LSE Phelan United States Centre

Seminar Series: Race, Gender and Politics in the US

Third Seminar: Jim Crow 2.0: Voter Suppression in the 21st Century

Speaker: Professor Carol Anderson (Emory University)
Chair: Professor Matthew Jones (LSE International History)

This seminar reflected on the intersection of race and rights in the contemporary US. Professor Anderson discussed the evisceration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, voter suppression, and the resistance against this anti-democratic trend.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  research cluster.



nutzenadel

24 November 2021, Wednesday, 6pm, Zoom

Co-hosted with the German Historical Institute London

Gerda Henkel Visiting Professorship Inaugural Lecture: Fascism and Finance. Economic Populism in Interwar Europe

Speaker: 2021/22 Gerda Henkel Visiting Professor Alexander Nützenadel

After 1918, populist movements regularly appealed to economic conflicts between nations and to a loss of financial sovereignty. By comparing Italy, Germany, France and Britain, this lecture will explore the emergence of economic populism and its transnational dynamics in inter-war Europe. Authoritarian models of financial regulation, often based on a combination of charismatic leadership and technocratic government, gained tremendously ground. They transcended fascist rule and had a lasting impact on economic policy after 1945.

The Visiting Professorship is a joint project of the GHIL and the Department of International History at LSE and is funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation.

Sponsored by the Department's Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century research cluster.



steele

10 November 2021, Wednesday, 6pm to 7.30pm, Zoom

Public Lecture: "The Most Magnificent Party in History" or "The Devil’s Feast?": The Shah’s Imperial Celebrations of 1971 and Problems in the Historiography of Late Pahlavi Iran

Speaker: Dr Robert Steele (pictured, LSE International History)
Chair: Professor Vladislav Zubok (LSE International History)

In this lecture, Dr Robert Steele examined the 1971 Persepolis Celebrations and their place in the history and historiography of modern Iran.

Sponsored by the department's Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research cluster.



Adriane-Lentz-Smith-200x200

9 November 2021, Tuesday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Co-organised with LSE Phelan United States Centre

Seminar Series: Race, Gender and Politics in the US

Second Seminar: The Slow Death of Sagon Penn: Police Violence in Reagan-era San Diego

Speaker: Dr Adriane Lentz-Smith (Duke University)
Chair: Professor Matthew Jones (LSE International History)

In this seminar, Dr Lentz-Smith used the case of Sagon Penn, a young black martial-arts expert who was acquitted of the murder of a white police officer in 1985, to examine police racism and violence in Reagan-era San Diego.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  research cluster.



BaerTheOttomans

28 October 2021, Thursday, 2pm-3.30pm, Zoom

Book Launch: The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars, and Caliphs

Speakers: Professor Marc David Baer (LSE International History) and Dr Dina Gusejnova (LSE International History)
Chair: Professor Piers Ludlow (LSE International History)

Professor Baer introduced his new book, The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars, and Caliphs (Basic Books, 2021), followed by a conversation with Dr Gusejnova.

Sponsored by the Department's Pre-Modern East and WestModern World History and Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century research clusters.

Listen to the podcast.



Thumbnail-black-women-and-political-leadership-in-the-us

26 October 2021, Tuesday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Co-organised with LSE Phelan United States Centre

Seminar Series: Race, Gender and Politics in the US

First Seminar: Black Women and Political Leadership in the US 

SpeakersDr Anastasia Curwood (University of Kentucky) and Professor Nadia E. Brown (Georgetown University)
ChairDr Imaobong Umoren (LSE International History)

This interdisciplinary seminar series will unite historians and political scientists to share current research on the theme of "Race, Gender and Politics in the US in historical and contemporary perspective". Given the current rise in White supremacy, sexism, police brutality, and the global Black Lives Matter movement, scholars will reflect on the longer arch of these issues historically and how their complexity shapes our present moment. The first seminar focused on the role of Black women and political leadership highlighting the links between figures like Shirley Chisholm, who in 1968 became the first African American woman to enter Congress and in 1972 became the first African American woman to seek the nomination for president of the US from one of the major political party’s, and current US Vice President Kamala Harris.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  research cluster.



Cant - LandWithoutMasters

12 October 2021, Tuesday, 6pm-7.30pm, Zoom

Book Launch: Land Without Masters: Agrarian Reform and Political Change under Peru's Military Government

Speakers: Dr Anna Cant (LSE International History) and Professor Paulo Drinot (UCL)
Chair: Dr Tanya Harmer (LSE International History)

Book launch of Dr Cant's new manuscript, Land Without Masters, with comments from Professor Drinot and a Q&A with the author. The book offers a fresh perspective on the way the Peruvian government’s major 1969 agrarian reforms transformed the social, cultural, and political landscape of the country.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  research cluster.



Haslam

*** Postponed: new date to be announced ***

Book Talk: International Communism and the Origins of World War II

Speakers: Professor Jonathan Haslam (Institute for Advanced Study, pictured), Sir Rodric Braithwaite, Dr David Motadel (LSE International History), Dr Antony Best (LSE International History)
Chair: ProfessorVladislav Zubok (LSE International History)

A discussion of Professor Jonathan Haslam's new book The Spectre of War: International Communism and the Origins of World War II. Looking beyond traditional explanations of the roots of the Second World War, he explores the neglected thread connecting them all: the fear of Communism prevalent across continents during the interwar period.

Sponsored by the department's Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century and Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research clusters.



milani

6 May 2021, Thursday, 5.30pm to 7pm, Zoom

Book Talk: Hendrik de Man and Social Democracy: The Idea of Planning in Western Europe, 1914-1940

Speakers: Dr Tommaso Milani (pictured, EUI) Professor Martin Conway (Oxford) and Dr Dina Gusejnova (LSE International History)
Chair: Professor Piers Ludlow (LSE International History)

Dr Milani discussed his new book on Hendrik de Man and the crisis of interwar socialism by looking at the role of economic planning in theory and practice.

Sponsored by the department's Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century research cluster.

Listen to the podcast.



sherman

29 April 2021, Thursday, 6pm to 7.30pm, Zoom

GloBio Talk: The Most Remarkable Woman: The International Life and Diplomacy of Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit

Speakers: Professor Manu Bhagavan (City University of New York), and Dr Taylor C. Sherman (pictured, LSE International History)

This talk was based on Manu Bhagavan’s forthcoming biography of Madame Pandit.

Sponsored by the department's Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research cluster.

Co-hosted with Biography and Memoir - The Graduate Center at City University of New York.



Event Banner Small 1

22 April 2021, Thursday, 4pm to 5.30pm, Zoom

History, Culture and Diplomacy Series: Waiting with Godot?: Pandemic Endings in Perspective

Speakers: Professor Mary Dudziak (Emory University School of Law), Laura Spinney, Paula Larsson (University of Oxford), Emeritus Professor Michel Goldman (Université Libre de Bruxelles), Dr Michael Reynolds (LSE International History).
Chair: Dr Victoria Phillips (LSE International History)

The second seminar of this series moved from historical and legal perspectives on endings to set the framework for a discussion on the implications of the current pandemic as it winds down.

Sponsored by the department's Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research cluster.

Co-hosted with Department of History at Columbia University and University of East London

Listen to the podcast.



David Armitage

18 March 2021, Thursday, 6.30pm to 7.30pm, Zoom

Department of International History Annual Lecture: Paper Chains or Lilliputian Cords? Towards an Intellectual History of Treaties

Speaker: Professor David Armitage (Harvard)
Chair: Professor Piers Ludlow (LSE International History)

This event examined how treaties have been thought about and argued over, what cultural traces they have left, and how the corpus of treaties might become a resource for intellectual historians.

Listen to the podcast.



Gusejnova

5 March 2021, Friday, 2pm to 3.15pm, Zoom

LSE Festival: Learning from History for a Post-COVID World

Speakers: Dr Dina Gusejnova (pictured), Dr Raghav Kishore, Professor David Stevenson, Dr Tim Hochstrasser and Dr Joanna Lewis (all LSE International History), Dr Farah Bede (IRIS Domestic Violence and Abuse Programme in Tower Hamlets)
Chair: Professor Piers Ludlow (LSE International History)

The International History Department analysed historical examples of recovery and reconstruction after disasters, including wars, rebellions, and financial crashes as well as pandemics. 

The event was part of the LSE Festival: Shaping the Post-COVID World.

Listen to the podcast.



OperationMoonglow - Banner

8 February 2021, Monday, 6pm, Zoom

Book Talk: Operation Moonglow: A Political History of Project Apollo

Speaker: Dr Teasel Muir-Harmony (Smithsonian)
Chair: Dr Thomas Ellis (LSE International History)

Dr Teasel Muir-Harmony discussed the political forces that brought Americans to the Moon in 1969 and the space programme’s role in American diplomacy.

Sponsored by the department's The Americas in World History  and the Contemporary International History and the Global Cold War research clusters.

Listen to the podcast.



NaturesEvil-Banner

4 February 2021, Thursday, 5pm to 6.30pm, Zoom

Book Discussion: Nature’s Evil. A Cultural History of Natural Resources

Speakers: Professor Alexander Etkind (EUI), Professor Maxine Berg (Warwick), Dr Katja Castryck-Naumann (Leipziger Universitatsverlang) and Professor Giorgio Riello (EUI/Warwick)
Chair: Dr Dina Gusejnova (LSE International History)

A discussion of Alexander Etkind’s book Nature’s Evil. A Cultural History of Natural Resources (Polity, 2021) followed by a roundtable conversation.

Sponsored by the department's Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century research cluster.

Listen to the podcast.



ruin-and-renewal-banner

26 January 2021, Tuesday, 6pm to 7pm, Zoom

Book Discussion: Ruin and Renewal: Civilising Europe after World War II

Speakers: Professor Paul Betts (Oxford), Professor Sir Richard J. Evans (Cambridge) and Professor Mary Vincent (Sheffield)
Chair: Dr David Motadel (LSE International History)

The panel discussed Professor Paul Bett’s new book, Ruin and Renewal. Civilising Europe after the Second World War (Profile Books, 2020). Drawing on original sources as well as individual stories and voices, the book provides an account of how Europe rebuilt itself - and what we, in the twenty-first century, could lose again.

Sponsored by the department's Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century research cluster.

Listen to the podcast.



Kishore-UngovernableCity

11 January 2021, Monday, 2pm to 3pm, Zoom

Book Launch: The (Un)Governable City: Productive Failure in the Making of Colonial Delhi, 1858-1911

Speakers: Dr Raghav Kishore (LSE International History), Dr Prashant Kidambi (University of Leicester) and Dr Sheetal Chhabria (Connecticut College)
Chair: Dr Taylor Sherman (LSE International History)

Dr Raghav Kishore discussed his new book The (Un)governable city: Productive Failure in the making of Colonial Delhi, 1858-1911 (Orient BlackSwan, 2020), which explores the radical transformation of urban governance in Delhi between 1858 and 1911 as bureaucracy expanded and new modes of governance reshaped the city—spatially, politically and culturally. 

Sponsored by the department's Modern World History research cluster.