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Videos and podcasts

Talking about Inequality

The International Inequalities Institute at LSE has hosted some of the world's biggest names to talk about inequality. Watch and listen to their talks here. You can browse either by category, year or by speaker (alphabetical order).

Recent Highlights 

The Inner Level: how more equal societies reduce stress, restore sanity and improve wellbeing  LSE Public Lecture - 3 October 2018

Speakers: Professor Kate Pickett, Professor Richard Wilkinson                         

The speakers focus on the psychological effects of inequality, on how larger income differences increase feelings of dominance and subordination, and the consequences for mental illness.

Podcast available here 


Inclusive Growth in cities: a sympathetic critique  - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 16 October 2018

Speaker: Dr Neil Lee

The concept of ‘Inclusive Growth’ – a concern with the pace and pattern of growth – has become a new mantra in local economic development. Despite enthusiasm from some policy-makers, others argue it is a buzzword which is changing little. This paper summarizes and critiques this agenda.

Podcast available here 


Closing the Gender Data Gap:  from data access to informing decisions and changing behaviours  In collaboraition with the Global Institute for Womens Leadership, KCL - 16 October 2018 

Chair: The Hon Julia Gillard AC (Global Institute for Womens Leadership, KCL) Speakers:  Zamila Bunglawala (Cabinet Office and JRF Practitioner Fellow, III); Seeta Gangadharan (LSE); Anna Wechsberg (Government Equalities Office)

This panel event looked at the accessibility and transparency of data from across sectors, as researchers and policy makers look to close the gender data gap through informing decisions, changing behaviours and improving outcomes for all.

Podcast available here 


Revolution and Freedom: Nightmarch among India's revolutionary guerrillas  - Public Event 1 November 2018 

Speakers: Alpa Shah (LSE); Neel Mukherjee is the critically acclaimed author of three novels: A State of Freedom(2017), The Lives of Others (2014), and A Life Apart (2010).     

In her latest book, Nightmarch, which she will talk about at this event, Alpa Shah offers a profound understanding of why some of India’s poor have shunned the world’s largest democracy and taken up arms to fight for a fairer society in one of the most intractable and under-reported rebellions.

Podcast available here 


Choosing to be smart: Algorithms, AI, and avoiding the inevitability of unequal futures   -LSE Public Lecture - 20 September 2018

Speakers: Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan (LSE), Seda Gürses (COSIC/ESAT),  Barry Lynn (Open Markets Institute) 

Since the early 2000s, acquisitions by Microsoft, Google, Intel, and other big tech companies in AI and machine learning have been rapidly growing. As investments continue apace, and algorithms and artificial intelligence become integrated into our daily lives, public debate regularly fixates upon whether new, automated technologies can be used for good or bad. 

Podcast available here 


Experiences of money from the perspectives of London’s ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 20 November 2018 

Speakers: Dr Kate Summers and Dr Katharina Hecht

This paper compares qualitative interview data with individuals at the opposite ends of the income and wealth distributions, in a society with large economic inequality.

Podcast available here 

 

Themes 

Causes of Inequality (overview)

Causes of Inequality (specific forms of inequality)

Intersectionality, Gender, Race & Religion

Reproduction of Inequalities

Consequences of Inequality

Measuring Inequality

Solutions to Inequality

The Hon Julia Gillard AC, Zamila Bunglawala, Seeta Gangadharan and Anna Wechsberg - Closing the Gender Data Gap:  from data access to informing decisions and changing behaviours  

Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Seda Gürses and  Barry Lynn -  Choosing to be smart: Algorithms, AI, and avoiding the inevitability of unequal futures   

Tony Atkinson - Inequality: What Can Be Done?

Tony Atkinson - Policy Implications (Inequality in the 21st Century Conference)

Thomas Piketty's response to Tony in the above

 Zamila Bunglawala - Nudge Theory and What Works - dynamic approaches to opening up data  

John Hills, Deborah Hargreaves & David Soskice - Taxing the Rich (III Annual Conference)

Craig Calhoun, Shami Chakrabarti, Duncan Green & Phumeza Mlungwana - Challenging Inequalities

Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson DBE, Lord Chris Holmes MBE, David Isaac CBE  and Liz Sayce - Switching Focus: whose responsibility to improve disabled people's employment and pay?  

David Stasavage - Taxing the Rich: a history of fiscal fairness in the United States and Europe

Guy Standing - Basic Income: and how we can make it happen

Naila KabeerIntersecting Inequalities and the Sustainable Development Goals: insights from Brazil

Chuck Collins, Mvuyo Tom, Anna Rathbone, Simon Duncan - Health Equity: barriers and oppportunities

Jee Kim, Katy Wright, Amartya Sen - Inequalities: changing the terms of the debate

Darren Walker - Investing in Equality: the role of capital and justice in addressing inequality

Cristobal Young - The Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight: how place still matters for the rich

Rachel Lomax, Ed Miliband, David Willets - What Can Be Done to Reduce Inequality? 

Tania Burchardt, Amy Feneck, Sam Friedman, Luna Glucksberg - The Challenge of Richness? Rethinking the Giant of Poverty (LSE Festival 2018)

Tania Burchardt, John Hills, Stephen Jenkins, Lucinda Platt - Five LSE Giants' Perspectives on Poverty (LSE Festival 2018)

Chris Hughes, Natalie Fenton, Kam Sandhu and Bev Skeggs - Fair Shot: rethinking inequality and how we earn

 

Archive 

2018

 Nudge Theory and What Works - dynamic approaches to opening up data            Supported by JRF, 5th December 2018 

Speakers: Zamila Bunglawala, JRF Fellow in Practice and Deputy Director, Race Disparity Unit, Cabinet Office; David Halpern, Chief Executive, Behavioural Insights Team; Sandra Kerr, Race Equality Director, Business in the Community (BiTC); and Mike Savage, Director, International Inequalities Institute, LSE

Chair: John Pullinger, UK National Statistician, Head of the Government Statistical Service and Chief Executive UK Statistics Authority

Dynamic approaches towards open data to identify ‘what works’, to inform behavioural change and public and private sector policies, to reduce inequalities.

Increasingly, data is how we make sense of the world. From GDP to the UN’s sustainability goals, key indicators are held up as objective reflections of the world.  This open dialogue event will highlight dynamic approaches from the new ONS Center for Equalities and Inclusion, from 'nudge theory' and behavioural change, sharing ‘what works’ and informing policies in the public and private sectors to reduce inequalities in gender pay, ethnic minority employment and wider inequalities. 

Podcast available here  


 

 Switching Focus: whose responsibility to improve disabled people's employment and pay?  - Supported by JRF, 28th November 

Speakers: Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson DBE (cross-bench peer), Lord Chris Holmes MBE, David Isaac CBE (Chair, Equality and Human Rights Commission) and Liz Sayce (LSE, III)

Chair: Dr Tania Burchardt (LSE, Department of Social Policy)

Links to video and audio: 

Audio, see here    

Video, see here


 

 Experiences of money from the perspectives of London’s ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 20 November 2018 

Speakers: Dr Kate Summers and Dr Katharina Hecht

This paper compares qualitative interview data with individuals at the opposite ends of the income and wealth distributions, in a society with large economic inequality.

Podcast available here 

 


Uncertain citizenship: Everyday practices of Bolivian migrants in Chile - Part of the Seminar Series on Migration, Ethnicity and Race - 8 November 2018 

Speaker: Dr Megan Ryburn 

Uncertain Citizenship explores how Bolivian migrants to Chile experience citizenship in their daily lives. Intraregional migration is on the rise in Latin America and challenges how citizenship in the region is understood and experienced.

Podcast available here 


Revolution and Freedom: Nightmarch among India's revolutionary guerrillas  - Public Event 1 November 2018 

Speakers: Alpa Shah (LSE)Neel Mukherjee is the critically acclaimed author of three novels: A State of Freedom(2017), The Lives of Others (2014), and A Life Apart (2010).     

In her latest book, Nightmarch, which she will talk about at this event, Alpa Shah offers a profound understanding of why some of India’s poor have shunned the world’s largest democracy and taken up arms to fight for a fairer society in one of the most intractable and under-reported rebellions.

Podcast available here 


 

Tackling ethnic disparities using websites  - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 30 October 2018  

Speaker: Zamila Bunglawala (Strategy and Insight, Race Disparity Unit, Cabinet Office)

Since it’s 2017 launch the Cabinet Office Race Disparity Audit’s https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/ website, detailing all Government data broken down by ethnicity is a world-fist has raised the exposure of ethnic disparities across the country, and helped to shine a light on areas where more focus is needed.

Podcast available here 


 

The Impact of Immigration on Natives’ Fertility: Evidence from Syrians in Turkey Part of the Seminar Series on Migration, Ethnicity and Race - 25 October 2018 

Speaker: Dr Berkay Özcan (LSE)

The discussion on whether immigration can solve the problems of population aging often focus on the fertility of immigrants. Additionally, standard projections often consider the impact of migration on population growth but assume that the natives’ fertility does not change in response to migration. 

Podcast available here 


Closing the Gender Data Gap:  from data access to informing decisions and changing behaviours  In collaboraition with the Global Institute for Womens Leadership, KCL - 16 October 2018 

Chair: The Hon Julia Gillard AC (Global Institute for Womens Leadership, KCL) Speakers:  Zamila Bunglawala (Cabinet Office and JRF Practitioner Fellow, III); Seeta Gangadharan (LSE); Anna Wechsberg (Government Equalities Office)

This panel event looked at the accessibility and transparency of data from across sectors, as researchers and policy makers look to close the gender data gap through informing decisions, changing behaviours and improving outcomes for all.

Podcast available here 

 


Inclusive Growth in cities: a sympathetic critique  - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 16 October 2018

Speaker: Dr Neil Lee (LSE)

The concept of ‘Inclusive Growth’ – a concern with the pace and pattern of growth – has become a new mantra in local economic development. Despite enthusiasm from some policy-makers, others argue it is a buzzword which is changing little. This paper summarizes and critiques this agenda.

Podcast available here 


The Inner Level: how more equal societies reduce stress, restore sanity and improve wellbeing  LSE Public Lecture - 3 October 2018

Speakers: Professor Kate Pickett, Professor Richard Wilkinson                          

The speakers focus on the psychological effects of inequality, on how larger income differences increase feelings of dominance and subordination, and the consequences for mental illness.

Podcast available here 


Ethnographic exploration of the socio-economic transformation of the Basque country - Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 2 October 2018 

Speaker: Dr Luna Glucksberg

The aim of this research project conducted by the LSE Inequalities Institute in collaboration with the Agirre Lehendakaria Center was to understand the values, narratives and strategic decisions that have been taken in the Basque Country by public and private institutions during the last decades, to build a unique socio-economic model that presents positive equality indicators combined with a competitive economy.

Podcast available here 

 


 Choosing to be smart: Algorithms, AI, and avoiding the inevitability of unequal futures   - LSE Public Lecture - 20 September 2018

Speakers: Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan (LSE), Seda Gürses (COSIC/ESAT),  Barry Lynn (Open Markets Institute)  

Since the early 2000s, acquisitions by Microsoft, Google, Intel, and other big tech companies in AI and machine learning have been rapidly growing. As investments continue apace, and algorithms and artificial intelligence become integrated into our daily lives, public debate regularly fixates upon whether new, automated technologies can be used for good or bad. 

Podcast available here 


Tracking the Rise in Global Economic Inequality: new evidence from the World Inequality Report 2018 - 7 June 2018 

Speaker: Dr Lucas Chancel (General Coordinator of the World Inequality Report and Co-Director of the World Inequality Lab)

Discussants: Dr Rebecca Simson (LSE International Development Department) and Dr Duncan Green (Oxfam GB and Professor in Practice in the LSE International Development Department)

The first World Inequality Report (WIR2018), first launched in December last year at the Paris School of Economics, was coordinated by Facundo Alvaredo, Lucas Chancel, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. It draws from new findings of the World Wealth and Income Database (a project which regroups now more than 100 researchers all over the world) and provides the first systemic assessment of globalization in terms of income and wealth inequality since 1980.

Podcast available here 



 

 The Labour of Care: work, law, and finance - 1 May 2018

Speaker: Lydia Hughes, Kevin Lucas, Dr Insa Koch, Professor Nicola Lacey 

To celebrate May Day, the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, based at the International Inequalities Institute, held an event to explore how the Labour of Care - the often-ignored activity of caring for another person and it’s future role in social, political, and economic life.

Podcast available here


Cultural Studies and the Challenge of Inequality Today - 18 April 

Speakers: Professor Tony Bennett, Professor Bev Skeggs, Dr Clive James Nwonka

This event considered the prospects for contemporary thinking within the cultural studies tradition to engage with current inequalities. Mindful of the historical importance of this tradition, dating back to the 1960s and including work by Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, feminist cultural theory, and Bourdieu, the panel took stock of these older perspectives and offered their thoughts on contemporary prospects.

Podcast available here


 Fair Shot: Rethinking Inequality and How We Earn - 10 April 2018 

Speaker: Chris Hughes

Discussants: Professor Natalie Fenton, Kam Sandhu

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes made the case that one percenters like him should pay their fortune forward in a radically simple way: a guaranteed income for working people. Chris Hughes is the co-founder of the Economic Security Project. He co-founded Facebook and later led Barack Obama’s digital organising campaign for President. 

Podcast available here.


 Who Belongs? Can we Afford to be Different? -24 February 2018

Speakers: Brett Heasman, Celestin Okoroji, Professor Bev Skeggs, Dr Jana Uher

There have been significant advances in the rights, recognition and participation of diverse groups of people in the UK over the past 30 years. And yet, people’s backgrounds and characteristics – such as their age, gender, ethnicity, 'abilities' or 'disabilities', and sexual orientation – continue to strongly influence their life experiences, opportunities and prosperity.

Video here


 Five LSE Giants' Perspectives on Poverty - 24 February 2018 

Speakers: Dr Tania Burchardt, Professor Sir John Hills, Professor Stephen P Jenkins, Professor Lucinda Platt

Taking five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, themselves, like Beveridge, authors of influential reports, this event discussed how their thinking articulates with Beveridge’s vision and has advanced our understanding of poverty and how to tackle it.

Video here.


Lessons from Grenfell Tower: inequality and housing need, the Giant that still divides us - 23 February 2018 

Speakers: Professor Danny Dorling, Lynsey Hanley, Professor Anne Power

The crucially important role of social housing has been recognised following the Grenfell Tower disaster, which also laid bare the disconnect between the ‘elites’ and the most disadvantaged in society.This event explored the link between inequality and housing, evidenced by the growing demand for low cost rented housing among those on the very lowest incomes. 

Video here.


Writing Fiction to Dramatise Inequality - 21 February 2018 

Speakers: Louise Doughty (author of Apple Tree YardBlack Water, and Whatever You Love), Winnie M Li (LSE Media and Communications and author of Dark Chapter), Professor Nicola Lacey (LSE Law)

How can literature reach audiences in ways that social science research about inequality can’t? How can narratives about fictional characters dramatise lived experiences of social inequality – and what are the ethical implications of creating these narratives for a mass readership? 

This event brings together two award-winning authors (one established, one emerging) whose fiction explores various forms of social inequality. Louise Doughty, author of eight novels, is best known for her bestselling Apple Tree Yard, which was adapted into a BBC TV series. Winnie M Li is a PhD student at LSE, whose debut novel Dark Chapter, recently won The Guardian’s Not The Booker Prize and is inspired by her own lived experience of rape. 

Podcast here.


 The Challenge of Richness? Rethinking the Giant of Poverty - 20 February 2018

Speakers: Dr Tania Burchardt (LSE CASE), Amy Feneck, Dr Sam Friedman (LSE Sociology), Dr Luna Glucksberg (LSE III)

The economic and political power of the richest in our society has dramatically increased since 1942. 75 years on since his report, the panel discussed whether Beveridge’s concern with poverty now needs to be extended to include a concern with richness.

Video here.


The stakes of trade policy: global and domestic inequalities Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 20 February 2018 

Speaker: Dr Sarah Goff (LSE Government)

Economic nationalism is on the rise, while multilateral and regional decision-making on trade is floundering. These trends are highlighted by the collapse of the World Trade Organization’s Doha round, the US’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and the US and the UK taking steps that could lead to withdrawal from Nafta and the Common Market, respectively. When decision-making on trade shifts from multilateral institutions to states, what is at stake for equality?

Podcast here.


 

Crisis Politics and the Challenge of Intersectional Solidarity Co-hosted with Department of Gender Studies - 31 Januray 2018 

Speaker: Professor Akwugo Emejulu (University of Warwick)

Drawing on her new co-authored book, Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain, Akwugo Emejulu's talk explored the asymmetrical impacts of austerity measures on women of colour and their strategies for resistance in Scotland, England and France.

Video and podcast available here.


Selective schooling and its relationship to private tutoring: lessons from South Korea Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 30 January 2018 

Speaker: Dr Sonia Exley (LSE Social Policy)

In light of recent Conservative Government proposals to expand numbers of academically selective (‘grammar’) schools in England, Dr Sonia Exley considers the possibility that such a policy could fuel further what are already rising levels of private tutoring in England, with implications for inequality and for disadvantaged families.

Podcast available here.


 Neoliberalism, Social Oppression and Class Relations - 25 January 2018 

The LSE International Inequalities Institute and the Department of Anthropology welcome you on 25 January 2018 to a half day conference on ‘Neoliberalism, Social Oppression and Class Relations’ with Philippe Bourgois (keynote lecture), Jeffery Webber, Shelley Feldman, Tithi Bhatacharya and Beverley Skeggs (1-6pm, Room 9.04, Tower 2, Clements Inn, LSE) and an LSE public event evening panel discussion of ‘Ground Down by Growth: Tribe, Caste, Class and Inequality in 21st Century India' with Alpa Shah, Jens Lerche, Philippe Bourgois and Katy Gardner (6.30-8.00 pm followed by a drinks reception, Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE)

Podcast available here.


Income Inequality and Welfare Systems in the Yugoslav Successor StatesPart of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 23 January 2018 

Speakers: Dr Will Bartlett (LSEE Research on South East Europe), Dr Nermin Oruč (Center for Development Evaluation and Social Science Research, Sarajevo), Dr Jelena Žarković Rakic (University of Belgrade) and Dr Gorana Krstić (University of Belgrade)

Twenty-five years since the break up of Yugoslavia, the successor states record different levels of income inequality. Slovenia has one of the lowest levels of inequality in Europe, Serbia the highest, while Croatia has an intermediate position. Using the latest survey data (the EU-standard SILC survey on incomes and living conditions) the speakers explore the sources of income that are most important for explaining the emergent income inequalities. 

Podcast available here.


Toxic Inequality in the United States: economic inequality and racial injustice driving ugly politics - 18 January 2018 

Speaker: Professor Thomas Shapiro (Brandeis University)                          Discussant: Zamila Bunglawala (Race Disparity Unit, Cabinet Office)

This lecture was based on Thomas Shapiro's book Toxic Inequality, which examines a powerful and unprecedented convergence in the United States: historic and rising levels of wealth and income inequality in an era of stalled mobility, intersecting with a widening racial wealth gap, all against the backdrop of changing racial and ethnic demographics.

This event was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Video and podcast available here.


Economic and Racial Drivers of Toxic Inequality in the United States: Two Narratives, One Story Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series - 16 January 2018 

Speaker: Professor Thomas Shapiro (Brandeis University)

Since the Great Recession, most Americans' standard of living has stagnated or declined. Economic inequality is at historic highs. But, economic inequality differs by race; African Americans' net wealth is just a tenth of white Americans, and over recent decades, white families have amassed wealth at three times the rate of black families. Wealth disparities must be understood in tandem with racial inequities--that is a key part of why inequality in the United States is now toxic. 

Podcast available here.

 


By speaker (alphabetical order)

Facundo Alvaredo

Tony Atkinson

Tony Bennett

Will Bartlett

Catherine Boone

Zamila Bunglawala

Tania Burchardt

Craig Calhoun

Shami Chakrabarti

Lucas Chancel

Chuck Collins

Health Equity: barriers and opportunities (III Annual Conference 2017)

 

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Matthew Desmond

Danny Dorling

Akwugo Emejulu

Sonia Exley

Robert Frank

Dena Freeman

Sam Friedman

Julia Gillard

Luna Glucksberg

Sarah Goff

Duncan Green

Emily Grundy

David Halpern

Deborah Hargreaves

Lydia Hayes

Katharina Hecht

John Hills

Chris Hughes

Asma Jahangir

Stephen P Jenkins

Gareth Jones

Naila Kabeer

Jee Kim

Inequalities: changing the terms of the debate (III Annual Conference 2017)

 

Insa Koch

Nicola Lacey

Michèle Lamont

Neil Lee

Ruth Lister

Stephen Machin

Lisa McKenzie

Alan Manning

Branko Milanovic

Mary Morgan

Tim Newburn

Clive James Nwonka

PartecipArte Theatre Company

Kate Pickett

Thomas Piketty

Lucinda Platt

John A Powell

Anne Power

John Pullinger

Anna Rathbone and Simon Duncan

Health Equity: barriers and opportunities (III Annual Conference 2017)

Aaron Reeves

Bob Rowthorn

Megan Ryburn

Mike Savage

Liz Sayce

Walter Scheidel

Paul Segal

Stephanie Seguino

Amartya Sen

Alpa Shah

Thomas Shapiro

Anthony Shorrocks

Bev Skeggs

David Soskice

Guy Standing

David Stasavage

Nicholas Stern

Joseph Stiglitz 

Kate Summers

Mvuyo Tom

Health Equity: barriers and opportunities (III Annual Conference 2017)

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

Polly Vizard

Jane Waldfogel

Darren Walker

Kim Weeden

Joan C. Williams

Paul Willman

Richard Wilkinson

Katy Wright

Inequalities: changing the terms of the debate (III Annual Conference 2017)

Cristobal Young

Berkay Özcan