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Department News 2023-24

Events, media, appointments, publications and more


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Leigh Gardner's Sovereignty without Power: Liberia in the age of empires, 1822-1980 receives prestigious award

Leigh Gardner, Professor of Economic HIstory, has won the Lindert-Williamson Prize at the 2023 Economic History Association conference, for her book Sovereignty without Power: Liberia in the age of empires, 1822-1980 

The prize is awarded biennially for the most outstanding book in global, African, Asian, Australian and/or South American History.


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Historical Economic Demography (HED) Group

HED is an interdisciplinary network of LSE researchers exploring changes in population, health, migration, living standards and social mobility over time, from the Middle Ages to the present and across all continents. The group is led jointly by Professor Eric Schneider and Professor Neil Cummins.

Find more about HED's members, research and events here: Historical Economic Demography 

 


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Public event: The economic government of the world, 1933-2023

Speaker: Professor Martin Daunton

Thursday 26 October, 6.30-8.00pm, Old Theatre, LSE and online

Economic historian Professor Martin Daunton will talk about this new book, The economic government of the world, 1933-2023. This pulls back the curtain on the institutions and individuals who have created and managed the economy over the last ninety years, revealing how and why one economic order breaks down and another is built.

This event is co-hosted by the Department of Economic History and the Economic HIstory Advisory Board.

For more information and details of how to register go to the event page: The economic government of the world, 1933-2023


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Slavery, capitalism and the Industrial Revolution

Maxine Berg, Pat Hudson, Nick Draper, Tirthankar Roy, Patrick Wallis

Tuesday 10 October 2023, 7-8.30pm,  PAN G.01 (Pankhurst House), LSE 

A round table discussion of themes raised in Maxine Berg and Pat Hudson’s Slavery, capitalism and the Industrial Revolution. Berg and Hudson ‘follow the money’, detailing the role of slavery in the making of Britain’s industrial revolution, and its development as a global superpower. 

For more information and details of how to register go to the event page: Slavery, capitalism and the Industrial Revolution


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Public event: Trends and determinants of global child malnutrition: what can we learn from history?

Speaker: Professor Eric Schneider

Thursday 16 November 2023 6.30-8.00pm, Auditorium, Centre Building, LSE and online

In his inaugural lecture Eric Schneider will explore how child malnutrition, measured through child growth, has changed over the past 150 years around the world. Children with poor nutrition or who are exposed to high levels of chronic disease grow more slowly than healthy children. Thus, children’s growth is a sensitive metric of how population health has evolved over time.

For more information and details of how to register to to the event page: Trends and determinants of global child malnutrition


Professor Mary Morgan

Public event: How economics changes the world

Speaker: Professor Mary S. Morgan

Thursday 23 November 2023 6.30-8.00pm, Auditorium, Centre Building, LSE

Do economists’ ideas change the ways the economic world works? While the conventional view is that ideas create policy change and economic change follows on, it is just not that simple. We can see what is involved by looking at major changes , such as the reconstruction of post-war economies, post-colonial economic development planning, or switching from capitalist to socialist systems. Designing such new kinds of worlds required new ways of thinking about how the economic world could work involving imagination and cognitive work, and new kinds of economic measurements and accounting systems to deliver that change. Economic ideas are ‘performative’, meaning that they do change the ways economies work - but not on their own.

For more information and details of how to register to to the event page: How economics changes the world