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Thought Leadership

Inclusive Leaders

The conformity curse delays progress on diversity and inclusion
Karina Robinson

LSE Business Review, published 26 January 2023

Abstract

Conformity is part of our DNA, a useful attribute to ensure the continuation of the species by minimising conflict and maximising cooperation. But it is also the main impediment to creating a more diverse, inclusive workforce, as evidenced by the glacial pace of progress on gender equality. Karina Robinson writes that there are times when we need not to conform. She says that the courage to step outside the consensus and make a stand, however lonely, is crucial.

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5 ways to help workplace perfectionists break their time-sucking traits
Yolanda Blavo, Dr Grace Lordan

Fast Company, published 24 January 2023

Abstract

Have you ever spent hours or days on a PowerPoint presentation, only for it to get a cursory glance in one meeting? Have you found yourself working late nights drafting a report that ends up with only a handful of downloads? Do you have an overflowing folder of projects that weren’t quite good enough, so they were never subjected to external scrutiny and languish in your bottom drawer? 

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What to do if you hate your job
Dr Grace Lordan

Financial Times, published 23 January 2023

Abstract

There are many reasons why you may hate your job. The tasks are arduous. The pay is shoddy. You might be among the one in 10 people who report being bullied at work. Growth opportunities are limited. The precarious nature of your employment is causing your health to decline. Day to day, it is boring.

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UTOPIA and the City: the future of work in financial and professional services
Jasmine Virhia, Yolanda Blavo, Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review, published 19 January 2023

Abstract

In the midst of a reorganisation of work caused by the pandemic, there is no one-size-fits-all arrangement and employers are battling to find the right mix between office and home working. To learn more about how to get closer to optimal conditions in the sector, Jasmine Virhia, Yolanda Blavo, and Grace Lordan conducted 100 interviews with employees across financial and professional services and created a framework called UTOPIA.

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Courage and leadership in 2023
Dr Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review, published 4 January 2023

Abstract

The type of leader who has succeeded in the past is probably not going to cut it in the new economy. The new times demand a high level of innovation that cannot be achieved by alpha leaders. Grace Lordan writes that successful leadership will require a lot of courage to do things differently.

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Workplace Friendships
Odessa Hamilton, Jasmine Virhia, Teresa Almeida

British Psychological Society, published 31 October 2022

Abstract

Workplace friendships have been described as a non-exclusive, spontaneous relationship founded on shared interest, aligned values, mutual trust, commitment, and enjoyment. They are a relational forum, with socioemotional and instrumental function, that presents an informal, intimate, and voluntary connection between employees.

What are the pros and cons of workplace friendships, and how might we draw on the psychological evidence to ensure they are positive and equitable?

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How to use science to know whether the change you’re making is really working
Grace Lordan, Teresa Almeida

Fast Company, published 28 October 2022

Abstract

Adapt or perish has become a hallmark of modern leadership. Leaders are increasingly faced with new challenges in uncertain contexts, and expected to address complex questions about the future of their organizations, the workforce, and even societal issues. How to plan for increased employee autonomy? Climate change? Social justice? Cost-of-living crisis?

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How the rising cost of living is widening inequality and affecting the most vulnerable
Mahnoor Murad Khan, Yolanda Blavo

LSE Business Review, published 20 October 2022

Abstract

With consumer prices rising above wage increases, broadening gaps for disadvantaged groups in the UK have become increasingly apparent. Mahnoor Murad Khan and Yolanda Blavo look at the impacts of the crisis on specific groups such as gig workers and domestic abuse victims, and write that understanding the needs of disadvantaged groups requires re-examining systems already in place that sustain inequality.

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Making diversity, equity, and inclusion relevant to the global workforce
Nikita

LSE Business Review, published 22 September 2022

Abstract 

Even though issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) have assumed a prominent position within multinational corporations, many companies might not be paying attention to the specific needs of global workers who are either based in their home countries or have become part of the global diaspora in Western countries. Nikita writes about the case of India, where the diversity, equity, and inclusion agendas of private companies do not make room for traditionally marginalised groups like the lower-caste groups.

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A tribute to HM Queen Elizabeth II
Odessa Hamilton

The Inclusion Initiative, published 12 September 2022

Abstract

Odessa Hamilton writes a moving tribute regarding the life of HM Queen Elizabeth II. 

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Inclusion, inequality, and responses to the cost-of-living crisis
Sarah Ali, Teresa Almeida

LSE Business Review, published 8 September 2022

Abstract

With the costs of energy, housing, and food on the rise around the world, families are in desperate need of support. Some employers in the UK have been providing employees with food, discounts, and. flexibility. Trade union membership is higher than in the past 30 years, but low-paid workers are underrepresented, and the government must provide targeted support for them. Sarah Ali and Teresa Almeida analyse business and government responses to the crisis and discuss the steps taken, how effective these forms of support have been, and the economic inequalities they have exacerbated.

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Why ending favouritism is the key to building a diverse workforce
Dr Grace Lordan

Financial Times, published 21 July 2022

Abstract

Can diversity bring better outcomes in business? The lazy answer is simply “yes”, given the question is so complicated. The truth is that diversity is linked to better business outcomes, particularly when the job involves innovation, creativity and the assessment of risk: think investment banking, asset management and venture capital. This article, and my wider work, focuses on diversity in these sectors and in professional services.

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The beauty and perils of language 
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review, published 23 June 2022

Abstract

Inclusive language seeks to counter stereotypic assessments that deny respect, dignity, and opportunity. Patterns of thought underlie discourse, so what is said is a visceral manifestation of what is thought. Odessa Hamilton writes that by acknowledging the ability of language to shape and reflect reality, diversity and equality initiatives can become more powerful vehicles for social change, inclusion, and justice.

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How Empathy and Competence Promote a Diverse Leadership Culture
Teresa Almeida and Dr Grace Lordan

MIT Sloan, published 14 June 2022

Abstract

Achieving gender balance in management teams requires focusing on the role that the leadership environment plays in shaping ambitions, opportunities, and experience. Meaningful diversity and inclusion actions are now seen as mandatory for new generations entering the workforce. But the effectiveness of current measures in the finance sector falls short of these expectations. The 2021 Women in the Workplace study conducted by McKinsey and LeanIn.org found that women in North America remain dramatically underrepresented in financial services.

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Age Diversity Forum Key Note Address
Karina Robinson

Champion Age Diversity Day, delivered 9 June 2022 

Abstract 

This is the keynote speech delivered by Karina Robinson, Co-Director of The Inclusion Initiative, on Champion Age Diversity Day, as part of a panel on Valuing Age Diversity in the Workplace. This event was sponsored by The Age Diversity Forum and Hansuke Consultants. 

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Change your application, interview, and onboarding processes to attract neurodiverse talent
Dr Jasmine Virhia

LSE Business Review, published 26 May 2022

Abstract

The definition of talent across many organisations is often narrow, and an over-dependence on traditional interviews leads to neurodiverse individuals being disadvantaged. Jasmine Virhia lists small changes to recruitment processes could make it easier for neurodiverse individuals to access employment opportunities.

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Yet to try a 4-day week? Here’s how to do it productively
Teresa Almeida, Dr Grace Lordan

Fast Company, published 24 May 2022

Abstract

Today, leaders face increasing calls for more flexibility, low employee engagement, the Great Resignation and all-time high levels of burnout. Is the four-day workweek the solution to achieving work-life balance? Almost weekly, companies around the world announce they are experimenting with four-days at work, three-days off. But does it work? And do certain groups of workers benefit more than others?

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Five ways for leaders to work faster, better, and more inclusively
Dr Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review, published 19 May 2022

Abstract

The world of work is changing and so should leaders. Besides being highly competent, they also must be highly skilled at listening to diverse team members and drawing the dots between their diverse ideas to find innovative solutions for products and customers. Grace Lordan describes five ways for leaders to become more effective. 

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Should you hire for culture fit?
Paris Will

LSE Business Review, published 5 May 2022

Abstract 

Organisational culture (leadership styles, behaviours, values, and traditions) matters and 90% of employers indicate that identifying candidates with good culture fit is an important part of the selection process. However, culture fit has come increasingly under fire because it may add potential biases to the hiring process. Paris Will proposes a dynamic approach to value-based hiring practices.

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'I was absolutely shaking' how to ask your boss for a pay rise
Dr Grace Lordan

Telegraph, posted 21 April 2022

Abstract

"People are underpaid because performance is difficult to measure and pay is determined by unrelated things, such as extroversion, how a person dresses and an ability to thrive at office politics.”

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Why the ‘Great Resignation’ must lead to more inclusive workplaces
Dr Grace Lordan

Business Leader, published 13 April 2022

Abstract

In this guest article, Dr Grace Lordan, Founding Director of The Inclusion Initiative and Associate Professor in Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, shares her ideas regarding how employers can change their hiring and business practices in the age of the ‘Great Resignation’, so they can move towards a ‘great recruitment’ period – creating a more inclusive and positive workplace.

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The face behind the mask: re- thinking authenticity at work
Odessa Hamilton and Teresa Almeida

LSE Business Review, published 11 April 2022

Abstract 

Bias towards a narrow selection of characteristics, that are supposedly professional, limit the number of people who can be truly authentic at work, resulting in code-switching, assimilation, and self-segregation. Odessa Hamilton and Teresa Almeida discuss why representation alone cannot address this. Organisations must foster an environment where difference is valued through reflective leadership and colleague reinforcement.

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Disability inclusion at work: the many not the few
Teresa Almeida

LSE Business Review, published 31 March 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Teresa Almeida examines how disability prejudice perpetuates workplace ableism and the disability unemployment gap. People with disabilities face ongoing barriers to employment, as well as within the employment cycle and peer atmosphere. More flexible accommodation for all employees will help increase disability inclusion within companies.

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The many shapes of religious privilege in the workplace
Hannan Bader

LSE Business Review, posted 24 March 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Religious privilege in the workplace can manifest itself in various ways. It is not exclusive to believers but can occur in organisations with a majority of agnostic or atheist workers. Hannan Bader writes that when religious privilege is made more salient to workers across the organisation, it is easier to handle the problem.

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How to Make Your Organization’s Language More Inclusive
Odessa Hamilton, Dr Grace Lordan, Lindsay Kohler, Elle Bradley Cox

Harvard Business Review, published 18 March 2022

Abstract 

We’ve all become increasingly aware of the importance of language in creating inclusive and equitable work cultures. Words matter, and many bygone words and phrases seem antiquated and even shocking today. Yet the modern-day professional vocabulary is still littered with exclusionary terms. To create a truly inclusive culture, it’s critical that you take a hard look at how people in all areas of your company are using language.

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How to counteract social network privilege in the labour market
Segolene Zeller

LSE Business Review, posted 3 March 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Our social networks are partially ascribed from the day we are born, escalate into a larger web throughout our lifetime, and can give us a significant advantage in the labour market. Segolene Zeller writes that our social capital becomes an ascribed status, alongside gender, family lineage, and skin colour. Since interacting across social boundaries may be difficult, our social networks tend to lack diversity. She suggests using behavioural science strategies in the design of organisational processes to support employees in creating the necessary change. 

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Neurotypical privilege in the labour market
Catherine Bouckley

LSE Business Review, posted 24 February 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Neurotypical people order their thoughts and communicate ideas in the most typical way. They enjoy a privilege that comes from living in a world that favours and is built for this specific neurology. However, the exclusion of neurodivergent people is bad for the workforce. Catherine Bouckley writes that neurodivergence makes an important contribution to cognitive diversity, which drives better performance and limits groupthink within organisations.

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What is social capital privilege?
Henry Dowell

LSE Business Review, posted 17 February 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Social capital — the networks and links within and between social groups — can benefit us by increasing wellbeing and creating economic opportunities. For people and organisations, the problem comes when social bonds and bridges work to exclude others rather than include. Henry Dowell writes that social bridges between diverse groups of people are important for creativity and innovation. Firms and managers must help build these bridges.

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Work. Stress. Sleep. Repeat. Breaking the cycle of mutually reinforcing work stress and sleep deprivation
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review, published 11 February 2022

Abstract

Work stress and sleep deprivation have accumulated effects on biological processes that maintain health. Odessa Hamilton summarises the evidence and explains why sleep should be a targeted behavioural treatment. 

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Ingroup privilege can drain workplaces of wellbeing and creativity
Yolanda Blavo

LSE Business Review, posted 10 February 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

Ingroup bias can be a big problem in the workplace, hurting both employees and organisations’ bottom line. Yolanda Blavo discusses some methods that managers can use to monitor the psychological safety of employees and their ability to voice ideas and concerns.

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Ageism in the workplace – the privilege of being the ‘right age’
Sharon Raj

LSE Business Review, posted 3 February 2022

Privilege in the Workplace series

Abstract 

In a world of ageing populations, extending working lives is widely viewed as an economic necessity. With up to four generations working alongside each other, organisations must ensure that their workplaces are inclusive, avoiding individual, interpersonal, and organisational harm. Sharon Raj writes that age discrimination can lead to the formation of workplace ingroups and outgroups, which reduces information sharing and collaboration. She discusses ways to address ageism in the workplace.

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When speaking of disability, let people define themselves
Dr Jasmine Virhia

LSE Business Review, posted 21 January 2022

Abstract

As more and more companies adopt inclusion initiatives, the language they use around disability acquires greater importance. How they refer to disabled employees may bring unintended consequences, sometimes increasing marginalisation instead of eliminating it. Jasmine Virhia stresses the importance of listening to how people define themselves. When in doubt, simply ask.

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SMILE in 2022
Dr Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review, published 17 December 2021

Abstract 

As 2021 draws to a close, Grace Lordan offers six life lessons rooted in the behavioural sciences that will make you SMILE.

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How to ensure that disabled employees have equal opportunities for success
Dr Jasmine Virhia

LSE Business Review, posted 14 December 2021

Abstract

A YouGov survey in June 2021 showed that 30% of disabled workers in the UK felt they were treated unfairly at work during the COVID-19 pandemic. By law, every employer must make reasonable adjustments for disabled members of staff. But the statistics show that employers are not complying. Jasmine Virhia discusses ways to create an inclusive environment to ensure that disabled people are afforded with the same career opportunities as their non-disabled colleagues. 

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Silence. Secrecy. Shame. Changing the narrative of gendered violence
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review, published 7 December 2021

Abstract

Domestic violence is a profound, systemic, social issue that warrants both our sustained attention and action. Odessa Hamilton dispels a number of misconceptions around the issue, as she discusses the behaviours of men and women, along with the possible causes of this violence. She recommends changing the narrative and calls on corporations to step up to the plate and help deal with domestic violence amongst their employees.

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It’s time to consider the impact on teams of temporal aspects of diversity
Paris Will, Frederick Herbert

LSE Business Review, published 23 November 2021

Abstract

It is a consensus that diversity is beneficial for organisations. But research on how diversity relates to each workplace outcome still contains mixed findings. One hypothesis states that positive and negative outcomes occur in parallel. Frederick Herbert and Paris Will discuss the empirical findings on the differential outcomes of diverse teams based on temporal dynamics and suggest ways to tailor initiatives better.

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Financial sector management practices are hindering drive for equality 
Dr Grace Lordan

Research for the World, published 9 November 2021

Abstract 

The financial sector will not achieve gender or racial equity while managers continue to favour those who look like them, a practice that has particularly held back black women in the sector. Grace Lordan highlights the importance of diversity, and sets out a framework that, if followed, should benefit all with talent.

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If you lie down with clones you will stagnante your career
Dr Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review Blog, published 26 October 2021

Abstract

We have a tendency to surround ourselves with and ask advice from people just like ourselves, putting us at risk of confirmation bias. When we want personal growth, Grace Lordan writes that we must think again about who we spend our time with or seek advice from. One of the easiest ways to grow quickly is to get feedback from people with diverse backgrounds and life experiences.

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Fifty things NOT to say to black people
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review Blog, published 22 October 2021

Abstract

Black people are habitually exposed to harmful discourse, even by those who by all other intents and purposes are anti-racist. Odessa Hamilton developed an informal online poll to hear from black people the kinds of comments they have heard first-hand from non-blacks. She captured 101 distinct comments and here presents the 50 most heinous or recurring ones. She says that, although painful on both sides, honest conversations are necessary.

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Inclusion in the workplace: how not to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory
Dr Grace Lordan, Lutfey Sidiqqi

LSE Business Review Blog, published 6 October 2021

Abstract

Sitting at a focal point between east and west, Singapore has a nuanced and multi-layered cultural landscape that exemplify the importance of context for behavioural interventions to promote diversity and inclusion (D&I). In the case of globally active multinationals, it matters whether the leadership team includes a sufficiently diverse set of experiences including those gained outside of western capitals. Grace Lordan and Lutfey Siddiqi did structured interviews with thirty-five professionals who have senior management oversight for operations in financial services in Singapore and drew three major insights to guide corporations in their D&I initiatives. 

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Opposition to equality, diversity, and inclusion from the perspective of change resistance
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review Blog, published 20 September 2021

Abstract

Equality, diversity, and inclusion initiatives require strategic management and calculated repositioning like any other major organisational change effort. Change can bring uncertainty, fear, and psychological distress among employees, leading to resistance that risks undermining change efforts. Odessa Hamilton overviews the change literature and writes that problematising all sources of resistance is a fundamental flaw in organisational change efforts. Validating resistance can legitimise the emotions of the resister, which can moderate their resistive efforts. 

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Is political correctness holding back progress on diversity, equity, and inclusion?
Paris Will, Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review Blog, posted 6 September 2021

Abstract

Political correctness may lessen overt forms of bullying and workplace harassment, but without internalisation of nonprejudiced values, it may come with the side effect of promoting more passive aggressive forms of discrimination, which work against the goal of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Paris Will and Odessa Hamilton suggest how to progress from political correctness as compliance to a true internalisation of egalitarian values. 

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How to create LGBTQ+ inclusion in the workplace: recognising the role of privilege 
Paris Will

LSE Business Review Blog, published 22 June 2021

Abstract

Heterosexist and cis-gendered privileges pervade the workplace, which affects employment outcomes for LGBTQ+ individuals. Paris Will reviews the literature and writes about specific steps that can create better opportunities and a more equitable working environment for all.

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Is the finance sector doing enough to promote gender equality?
Dr Grace Lordan

Opinion piece, Thomson Reuters Foundation News, 22 June 2021

Abstract

Women's success in finance relies on the sector having managers that create environments that include diverse voices and weeding out the managers who continue to hire in their own likeness.

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Finance's myth of meritocracy rewards mediocre managers
Dr Grace Lordan

Opinion piece, Financial Times, 23 June 2021

Hear it from the experts

Let our global subject matter experts broaden your perspective with timely insights and opinions you can’t find anywhere else.

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Beneath the skin: from occupational stress to mental illness
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review Blog, posted 19 May 2021

Abstract

A reported 1 billion people worldwide have struggled with their mental health, a condition that carries an undue stigma—and is likely underreported. Work demands are a salient cause. Odessa Hamilton writes that reducing daily burdens is critical to the health of the workforce (employers and employees). Mental health, she says, needs to become a regular discussion that can be shared without judgement or penalty, because no person is immune to it. 

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Not a joke: leveraging humour at work increases performance, individual happiness, and psychological safety
Teresa Almeida, Cecily Josten

LSE Business Review Blog, published 28 April 2021

Abstract

Why are workplaces often devoid of humour, if having a good laugh brings many benefits to people and organisations? Teresa Almeida and Cecily Josten look at the research on workplace humour and write that having, and showing, a sense of humour is a way to demonstrate authenticity and come across as more human. They argue that more experimental research is needed to test the benefits and downsides of humour interventions and how to best leverage humour to achieve positive work outcomes.

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Prince Philip: inequality, sacrifice, and gratitude
Odessa Hamilton 

LSE Business Review Blog, published 22 April 2021

Abstract

Odessa Hamilton reflects on the Duke of Edinburgh’s forfeiture of male dominance during an era when men ran the world and, by contrast, women lacked the most basic of rights.

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Is unconscious bias training still worthwhile?
Frederick Herbert

LSE Business Review Blog, published 24 March 2021

Abstract

Training can raise people’s awareness of their unconscious biases, but evidence shows that training alone is not effective in changing behaviour. The UK government has already decided to discontinue this kind of programme in its various departments. Frederick Herbert writes that while it is generally accepted that awareness is not a sufficient condition for behavioural change, it is usually necessary. He argues that unconscious bias training can be re-thought of as a foundation upon which other interventions can build.

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Managing careers in a post-Covid world
Teresa Almeida

TII Blog, published 8 March 2021

Abstract

How has the pandemic impacted career opportunities? What skills can help you succeed in a post-Covid world? How can you advance in the world of work? – These were some of the key topics of discussion in the Let’s Talk Careers in a Post-Covid World event hosted by The Inclusion Initiative at LSE.

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A thin silver lining in a year of uncertainty for professionals with disabilities
Odessa Hamilton

LSE Business Review Blog, published 16 December 2020

Abstract

2020 Disability History Month presents an eerily strange opportunity to highlight a thin silver lining in a year consumed with uncertainty and despondency for individuals with disabilities. This blog entry hopes to honour the occasion and speak to the reader via a quasi-first-person perspective that may well reflect the experiences of a range of professionals with disabilities. It seeks to characterise different facets of past and present occupational environments that affect the work life of people with disabilities.

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If firms start measuring the gains of flexible working, women will benefit
Dr Grace Lordan

LSE COVID-19 Blog, published 15 December 2020

Abstract

Financial services firms have regarded flexible working as an option for women struggling with family responsibilities. Now that it has become the norm, says Grace Lordan (LSE), they have an opportunity to measure whether it is cost-effective. Once men begin to see it as good for business, the penalty women pay for choosing flexible working will shrink.

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Disentangling privilege from merit: a crucial step for true inclusion at work
Cecily Josten, Paris Will

LSE Business Review Blog, published 3 December 2020

Abstract

At some point during the popular podcast series “How I Built This”, the host Guy Raz asks his guests who are all successful entrepreneurs: “Was your success down to luck or your skills?” Most entrepreneurs attribute their success to a bit of both, luck and skill. We usually think of luck as coming to us arbitrarily and being evenly distributed across individuals. In reality, however, what makes us lucky very often depends on where we grew up, which school we went to, or which skin colour we have etc.. In short, luck is not pure chance but depends on our privilege. Creating an awareness of individuals’ privilege — and factoring in privilege or a lack thereof — in the recruiting and retaining of talent in the workplace is hence imperative for achieving true diversity and inclusion at work.

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You can't be what you can't see! How can we increase diversity in Behavioral Science?
Cerita Bethea

TII Blog, published 14 July 2020

Abstract

For all the known benefits of leveraging and employing diverse talent in the space of Behavioral and Social Science, it is quite unsettling that the field remains largely homogenous. While we can’t always control for (lack of) unconscious bias training, gender stereotypes, geographical, structural, and financial barriers, there is one area where we can endeavor to close the gap - awareness. The profound behavioral insight upon which this is based: ‘You can’t be what you can’t see!’

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How employers can decide whom to bring back to work first
Professor Paul Dolan, Dr Grace Lordan

LSE COVID-19 Blog, published 18 May 2020

Abstract 

As lockdown eases, employers will bring back some of their staff before others. Drawing on their research into the negative effects of downward income mobility, Paul Dolan and Grace Lordan (LSE) suggest they take into account people’s preferences, and bring back those who are keenest to return to work first.

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Five behavioural science lessons for managing virtual team meetings
Rachel Jaffe, Dr Grace Lordan

LSE Business Review Blog, published 18 May 2020

Abstract 

With the onset of Covid-19, many firms have made the transition from physical workspaces to virtual ones, with limited or no planning time. After organisations get beyond the initial hurdle of shifting their workforce to a virtual format, they will be searching for a new definition of business as usual. During that time, it is important to bear in mind organisational issues that arise during social interactions. Even though a large percentage of the labour force is now working from home, many of these workers still rely on team interactions to create, innovate or assess risk.

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Inclusion is Critical in a Time of Crisis: Gathering Viewpoints from Leaders in Finance
Richard Nesbitt

TII Blog, published 7 May 2020

Abstract 

For leaders in Finance the crisis of 2020 makes everyone think back to the 2008 Financial Crisis.  That was bad but this is worse.  Fortunately, the lessons learned in 2008 are still fresh in most leader’s minds.  The banks and insurers are much better capitalized now than they were a decade ago.  Regulatory oversight is stronger. The products are simpler.  It is however a time of significant uncertainty.  Working from home has tested disaster recovery plans and the strength of technology platforms. 

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