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SOUTH ASIA: Law in the Post-colony

Recent calls to ‘decolonise’ knowledge and social frameworks in post-colonies are in fact a renewal of similar attempts over the last few decades to modernise arcane colonial ideological structures of knowledge, and to adapt colonial institutions to their contemporary contexts. Nowhere is this felt more acutely, consistently, and ironically than in the legal frameworks and penal codes of South Asia’s post-colonial nations: Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. While some areas like transgender rights have seen significant strides in some countries in the region, the persistence — and consequent misuse — of several outdated penal codes continue to hinder the realisation of a more equitable society.  

The events in this series, in collaboration with iProbono, are located at the intersection of South Asia’s socio-cultural crystallisation within and around inherited colonial criminal and civil penal codes, and their residual influence in post-colonial nation-states in the region. Academics, activists and practitioners will discuss continuity and change in the use of colonial laws, and explore the rationale of their use in anachronistic contexts.  Individual events will examine if legal reforms and judicial interventions can create an equal, fair and just society. 

iProbonoMT2020-2

COLONIAL LAWS AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Date/Time: Wednesday, 21 October/3-5:00pm UK Time

Speakers: Aparna Chandra (@ataparnachandra) is Associate Professor of Law, National Law School of India University, Bangalore; Osama Siddique (@DrOsamaSiddique) is Associate Fellow at the Institute of Development and Economics Alternatives, Lahore, and author of Pakistan’s Experience with Formal Law: An Alien JusticeAritha Wickramasinghe (@aritha) is a lawyer and Equality Director, iProbono.

ModeratorMariam Faruqi is South Asia Regional Director, iProbono.

Chair: Alnoor Bhimani (@AlnoorBhimani) is Director, LSE South Asia Centre.

This event is free and open to all and will be livestreamed on the LSE South Asia Centre's Facebook Page.