Conference

Annual Conference

The British Society for Population Studies holds an annual conference at a UK university each September, hosting researchers in population studies at all career stages working in academia, policy and other related fields.

The 51st Conference will be held at the University of Bath, 9-11 September 2024.


CALL FOR PAPERS: DEADLINE TUESDAY 30 APRIL (11.59pm UK time) 

SUBMIT HERE

You are invited to submit proposals for presentations and posters for the British Society for Population Studies’ 51st Conference, to take place at the University of Bath, 9-11 September 2024. The conference promises rich opportunities to share knowledge and meet fellow demographers working in university, government and other practical settings, as well as space for early-career researchers to develop networks in the field.

A provisional programme and booking forms will be available in May/June. There will be a full programme of simultaneous sessions of submitted papers, plus hands-on workshops and invited plenary sessions.

Abstracts for papers and posters across the entire demographic and population studies spectrum are welcomed. Any empirical or conceptual approach is welcome, with a demographic or population studies focus. Abstracts for papers reporting on research should clearly outline aims, method(s), and results (even if preliminary at the time of submission). Conceptual papers should offer clear expositions of how the paper contributes to the field. Viability of strands and sessions will depend on sufficient submissions being received.

Please choose your strand/session below and submit via the online submission form before midnight at the end of Tuesday 30 April 2024. A short abstract of up to 250 words is requested. Please read the Notes at the end of this call for papers.

Submit online at: https://forms.office.com/e/T2DTjRRerV

 

Strands and sessions with organisers (who may be contacted with queries):


Ageing

In this strand, we call for papers on key questions related to population ageing and inequalities. These might include, for example, papers that address issues arising for older people and their families in mental and physical health; cognition; emotional wellbeing; income, wealth and financial security; social engagement and employment; care provision and receipt; and intergenerational relations. Papers addressing such issues over the life course and investigating how inequality and setbacks in early life are linked to consequences in adulthood and/or later life are also encouraged, as are submissions on the role of policies responses to population ageing (such as active ageing, flexible retirement, social security and long-term services, digital inclusion, and age-friendly society) at the international, national and regional level. Submissions on single regions or countries, cross border and trans-national issues, cross country comparisons, or global perspectives are all welcome, as are those on trends and changes over time. Papers can use qualitative and/or quantitative research methodologies.

Strand organiser: Giorgio Di Gessa (UCL) – g.di-gessa@ucl.ac.uk

Ageing disgracefully

This session focuses on marginalised groups within the ageing population. Why can the the older generation still be portrayed as slipper wearing, armchair sitting, paper reading individuals? We welcome submissions concerning those groups that still practice what they preach and kick against social norms! Submissions could include but not limited to: sexuality, sport, fetish, fashion, subculture, activism etc.

Session organiser: Charlotte Goldthorpe (University of Huddersfield) – c.m.goldthorpe@hud.ac.uk


Climate change and population studies

Climate change and environmental degradation are reshaping the global landscape, influencing migration patterns, health outcomes, and demographic trends. This session welcomes submissions that investigate the multifaceted interactions between climate change and population dynamics. We seek contributions that shed light on the demographic consequences of environmental shifts, as well as the reciprocal impacts of population dynamics on climate change. Topics of interest include but are not limited to population displacement and resettlement, demographics of vulnerability and resilience, impacts of climate change on demographic processes, and policy responses.

Strand organisers: Tobias Ruttenauer (UCL), Jasmin Abdel Ghany (Nuffield College) and Dermot Grenham – t.ruttenauer@ucl.ac.uk; jasmin.abdelghany@nuffield.ox.ac.uk; dermot.grenham@gmail.com

Climate change and health

The intersection of climate change and health presents significant challenges for populations worldwide. They crucially interact with other demographic patterns such as urbanization, population aging and fertility. This sub-session seeks contributions that examine the demographic dimensions of climate-related health outcomes. We invite papers that investigate patterns of mortality and morbidity, disparities in access to healthcare services, and the role of demographic processes in shaping vulnerability and resilience to environmental health risks.

Session organisers: Jo Mhairi Hale (University of St Andrews), Emmanuel Olamijuwon (University of St Andrews) – jo.hale@st-andrews.ac.uk; eoo1@st-andrews.ac.uk

Climate change and migration

Climate change is one of the main societal challenges of the 21st century. Rises in temperature are predicted to increase the likelihood of extreme weather events including cyclones, floods, heatwaves and droughts and to lead to sea-level rise. These changes are expected to impact migration patterns both directly and indirectly through changes in agriculture, food prices, infrastructure and health. This session invites papers that address these challenges by providing novel empirical evidence, drawing on innovative data sources, improving methods or by proposing new conceptual frameworks on the nexus between climate and migration

Session organisers: Francisco Rowe (University of Liverpool), Aude Bernard (The University of Queensland) – fcorowe@liverpool.ac.uk; a.bernard@uq.edu.au


Critical demography and novel methodological approaches

We invite work that critically engages with demography and population studies, novel methodological approaches to demographic research, or demographic data collection. In particular, we encourage submissions of qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods research that furthers our understanding of core demographic concepts or trouble demographic assumptions, alongside studies that use novel, forward-thinking methodologies and analyses. Additionally, we are interested in submissions that theoretically or critically challenge current research, research methodologies, and classical theories in demography and broader population studies.

Strand organisers: Joe Strong (LSE) and Michaela Šedovič (UCL) – j.strong3@lse.ac.uk;  m.sedovicova@ucl.ac.uk


Data science

The combination of new sources of data and the increased availability of cheap computing power have opened up exciting new avenues for research in population science. Methodological advances and new statistical modelling approaches allow these new resources to be exploited to create new scientific knowledge and forecast our demographic futures. This strand welcomes papers that demonstrate the application of innovative data, methods and models to problems in the population sciences.

Demographic applications falling under the following headings are particularly encouraged:

  • big data
  • innovative statistical modelling and forecasting
  • Bayesian methods and uncertainty quantification
  • Modelling of kinship
  • simulation
  • machine learning

Strand organiser: Jason Hilton (University of Southampton) – j.d.hilton@soton.ac.uk 

Uncertainty in demographic forecasting and now-casting

This session welcomes methodological and applied papers that focus on, firstly, quantifying the uncertainty in demographic forecasting and now-casting, that is, the prediction of the present, of population components and population itself. Secondly, we welcome submissions on how uncertainty can be used in decision- and policy-making.

Session organisers: Arkadiusz Wiśniowski and Wendy Olsen (The University of Manchester) – a.wisniowski@manchester.ac.uk; wendy.olsen@manchester.ac.uk


Demographic perspectives on economic inequality

Demographic phenomena—such as population aging, union formation and dissolution, assortative mating, fertility and family size, mortality, migration, retirement, and inheritance—are closely related to macro-level trends in income and wealth inequality. This session welcomes papers that advance our understanding of how demography can explain patterns of economic inequality.

Strand organiser: Jiaxin Shi (University of Wisconsin-Madison) – jiaxin.shi@wisc.edu  


Demography of disaster and crisis contexts

This session brings together researchers studying population processes and data in disaster- and crisis-affected contexts. We welcome multidisciplinary perspectives spanning demography, health, economics, and sociology, as well as different methodological approaches. Disaster or crisis contexts could include conflict, displacement, climatic events, and de facto states.

Session organisers: Rosanna Le Voir (LSE), Tiziana Leone (LSE) and Orsola Torrisi (NYU) – r.h.le-voir@lse.ac.uk; t.leone@lse.ac.uk; o.torrisi@nyu.edu


Developments in official population statistics

Contributions to this strand are sought on developments in official series of population statistics, developments in and findings from the 2021/22 censuses and how official population statistics may transform in the future. Papers on the analysis and dissemination of these are also welcome.

Strand organiser: Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


Disability in LMICs: Measurement, challenges and opportunities

Disability, both mental and physical, is an under-researched area in many low- and middle-income countries. This session brings together research related to disability, broadly defined. Submissions are welcomed to explore various topics including the conceptualisation and measurement of disability, its prevalence and distribution, alongside the intersection of disability with healthcare, education, and other socio-economic factors. Papers may use qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods to explore individual regions or countries, cross-country analyses, global perspectives, or trends over time.

Session organisers: Andrew Amos Channon and Oki MacPherson (University of Southampton) – a.r.channon@soton.ac.uk; o.krisnadevi@soton.ac.uk


Families and households

This strand invites theory‐driven conceptual or empirical papers (qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods) that investigate the diversity of family or household compositions and outcomes. Comparative papers and case studies are welcome, as are submissions that challenge conventional assumptions and/or contribute to new conceptual and methodological frameworks for household and/or family. For instance, papers that assess the role of selection in known relationships in more detail are invited.

Examples of possible contributions include, but are not limited to:

  • Trends, determinants and consequences of demographic events
  • Relationships: Union formation, dissolution, relationship quality and satisfaction
  • Family and work: Employment, care and unpaid work
  • Policy related to families and households
  • Heterogeneous effects by e.g. gender, class, income, race/ethnicity, age/cohort, region

Strand organisers: Kathrin Morosow (University of Manchester) and Nitzan Peri-Rotem (University of Exeter) – kathrin.morosow@manchester.ac.uk; n.peri-rotem@exeter.ac.uk

Families and households in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs)

This session brings together research on family structures in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) and their gender differentiated impact on social and economic outcomes. This includes - but is not limited to - the role of social norms and institutions in LMICs in shaping parental incentives and child outcomes.

Session organiser: Jennifer Golan (University of Bath) – j.m.d.golan@bath.ac.uk

Transition to adulthood

The transition to adulthood is a critical stage of life that involves demographic markers such as completing education, leaving the parental home, entering full-time employment, and forming a union. This session brings together contributions that investigate transitions to adulthood as well as their variation across space and time.

Session organiser: Ginevra Floridi (University of Edinburgh) – ginevra.floridi@ed.ac.uk


Fertility and sexual and reproductive health

This strand welcomes abstract proposals that focus on fertility and/or sexual and reproductive health in any context. We invite people using any methods, including mixed and qualitative methods, to submit their work, and are especially keen for submissions on populations and issues that are lesser known/investigated in demography and population studies. Work at any stage of development is encouraged.

Strand organisers: Joe Strong (London School of Economics) and Selin Köksal (University of Essex) – j.strong3@lse.ac.uk; selin.koksal@essex.ac.uk

Dynamics of contraception: Trends, drivers, and consequences of contraceptive behaviour Contraception plays a key role in fulfilling fertility intentions, including the number, timing, and spacing of children as well as the prevention of unplanned pregnancies. We welcome papers from all country contexts that study trends, drivers, and consequences of contraceptive behaviour or explore the intersection of contraception with childbearing, partnership dissolution, or other life domains.

Session organisers: Theresa Nutz and Nora Müller (GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany) – theresa.nutz@gesis.org; nora.mueller@gesis.org

Early marriage and early fertility: Are they harmful and, if so, how harmful are they?

Early marriage and early fertility are argued to adversely affect young women. Ending early marriage is a specific Gender Equality Goal (item 5.3) in the SDGs (UN, 2015). However these goals must also be considered in a wider framing of reproductive justice and the contexts in which young women who experience early marriage and fertility live. This session aims to being out the complexities and controversies around these issues.

Session organisers: Shireen Kanji (Brunel University London), Chris Darko (University of Birmingham) and Fiona Carmichael (University of Birmingham)  – shireen.kanji@brunel.ac.uk; c.k.darko@bham.ac.uk; f.carmichael@bham.ac.uk


Health and mortality

Papers are invited on any aspect of health and mortality studies. Both papers addressing substantive topics about population health and mortality, as well as methodological development on issues related to health and mortality are welcome. Work from early career scholars, non-academic researchers, and postgraduates is encouraged. The strand’s intention is to showcase scholarship addressing current debates of mortality and health from an international perspective, including work from low-to-middle income countries.

Papers may address (though are not restricted to):

  • Concepts and measurement of mortality and health
  • Trends in adult health and health behaviours
  • Mortality and health in low-to-middle income countries
  • The environment and population health
  • Social determinants of health and health/mortality disparities
  • Early life health and mortality
  • Data challenges for mortality/health studies
  • Biosocial approaches to mortality differences and healths

Strand organiser: José Manuel Aburto (University of Oxford and LSHTM) – jose.aburto@lshtm.ac.uk


Historical demography

This strand welcomes submissions addressing any aspect of historical demography, or the history of demography as an academic discipline. Papers may focus on any of a broad range of themes, such as fertility, mortality, migration, household formation, social mobility, urbanization, public health, social inequality or other related fields in the context of historical populations. Contributions may focus on any part of the world, and at any scale, from local studies to international comparisons.

Strand organiser: Eric Schneider (LSE) – e.b.schneider@lse.ac.uk


Longitudinal census data: New developments and recent research findings

Each of the three census-based longitudinal studies in the UK (ONS LS, SLS and NILS) is being or has been updated with the latest census data. This strand will include recent and planned developments to the studies and will showcase some recent examples of research using the studies.

Strand organisers: Jim Newman (ONS); Oliver Duke-Williams (UCL), Peter Wilgar (NISRA) Greg Blackadder (NRS), Lee Williamson (University of Edinburgh), Ian Shuttleworth (QUB) and Becky Jathoonia (ONS) – jim.newman@ons.gov.uk


Migration

We welcome papers addressing any aspect of internal and international mobility and migration including those that focus on trends in and/or the drivers of internal and/or international migration as well as those that are interested in exploring whether and how internal and/or international migration intersects with other life course trajectories such as e.g., partnership formation and dissolution, childbearing, or employment. Papers which focus on the experiences of immigrants and/or their descendants are also very welcome.

Strand organisers: Aude Bernard (The University of Queensland) and Francisco Rowe (University of Liverpool) – a.bernard@uq.edu.au; fcorowe@liverpool.ac.uk

The interconnection across several domains in the life course of immigrants and their descendants

Many countries have witnessed increasing immigration streams and ethnic diversity over the past decades. The question remains whether the observed heterogeneity between immigrants and the native populations will persist among the descendants of immigrants. This session welcomes papers on the interconnection of life domains such as housing, employment, education, partnership, and parity among immigrants and their descendants. Research should focus on investigating life course trajectories by immigrant generations and/or countries of origin. We welcome papers that investigate all migrant types, including refugees and asylum seekers. Potential papers may include the usage of administrative or survey-based datasets and could apply different methodologies including but not limited to event history analysis, microsimulation techniques, or machine learning methods.

Session organisers: Mary Abed Al Ahad and Andrew Ibbetson (University of St Andrews) – maaa1@st-andrews.ac.uk; adgi1@st-andrews.ac.uk

 


Posters

Poster submissions are invited across the spectrum of population studies and demography. Researchers are encouraged to present results from completed studies or ongoing research not yet at the results stage (which is particularly well-suited to poster presentation).

Presenters are welcome to submit an abstract for consideration as a poster in addition to an oral submission. Presenters are expected to stand with their posters during the dedicated poster session on the first evening, to discuss their work.

There will be a poster prize of £100 in book tokens or equivalent vouchers, at least half of which will be for a student poster. 

Strand organisers: tbc


Telling the story in statistics

This strand invites examples of how you have brought your data to life, made your data discoverable, communicated your results to non-specialists and/or the steps taken to make your research more impactful. These could include examples of open data platforms, how you have found ways of making your messages accessible, reaching a wider audience or influencing policy.

Strand organiser: Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


Violence and abuse

This strand welcomes papers on violence and abuse that address the multifaceted challenges, root causes, and potential interventions in a global context. Topics of interest include: domestic/interpersonal violence, sexual abuse, homicide, modern slavery/trafficking, and racial, religious, state, or structural violence. Investigations may focus on population risk factors, age and gender, links to mortality/fertility/migration, methodological improvements, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, feminist critiques, and global and comparative perspectives. The strand will enhance academic and practitioner discourse on contributing towards SDG 5: Gender Equality by covering topics that encompass domestic, family, community, and conflict settings.

Strand organisers: Murylo Batista (London Borough of Camden), Lana Chikhungu (University of Portsmouth), Rebecca Harris (University of Southampton) and Amos Channon (University of Southampton) – murylo.batista@camden.gov.uk; lana.chikhungu@port.ac.uk; rebecca.harris@soton.ac.uk;  a.r.channon@soton.ac.uk


General and administrative queries: BSPS Secretariat – pic[at]lse.ac.uk

NOTES TO THE 2024 CALL FOR PAPERS:

Submissions should be made online at: https://forms.office.com/e/T2DTjRRerV

  • A maximum of TWO submissions please as first author or presenter. If submitting two, each must be for a different strand.
  • Organisers may request further details of a submission before final decisions are made. Oral and poster submissions are given equal weight.
  • Final decisions on papers accepted for presentation will be emailed to submitting authors in late May/early June, with poster notifications coming before the summer break.
  • Submissions from members & non-members are welcomed, as are those from early-career researchers.
  • Presentations may be allocated to a different strand or session from that to which submission was made.
  • Short abstracts will be posted to the BSPS website (with contact email unless otherwise requested) and may be changed up to the end of July.
  • Oral presentations will be organised into 60 or 90-minute sessions of 3-5 papers, with time for questions & discussion. Strand organisers or convenors will advise on the length of individual presentations or advise if a different format is planned.
  • If accepted, poster printing should be arranged by the presenter, in A0 format, portrait.
  • On submission, you will be requested to confirm you plan to present in person.

FEES AND FUNDING

  • Registration charges will apply for all attending, at member, non-member & student rates. Registration by the presenting author is required before the paper or poster is included in the final programme.
  • Bursaries will be available for student members, or local government members whose employer will not cover their costs & are only available if presenting a paper or poster:
    • Application is via selecting the appropriate option when responding to the call for papers. Later applications cannot be accepted.
    • Bursary applicants must be current BSPS members, and BSPS annual membership dues must be up to date at the time of responding to the call for papers.
    • The number of bursaries on offer may be limited or partial depending on budgetary constraints, and an application for a bursary does not guarantee it will be successful.
    • Bursaries provide a waiver of registration and on-site accommodation costs plus meals. Travel costs and any other expenses are not included.
    • Bursary recipients may be asked to assist on-site.
  • BSPS operates a Low- and Middle-Income Countries Initiative, which sponsors a visit by a demographer from a low or middle income country who gives a presentation at the BSPS Conference for that year. Please see https://www.lse.ac.uk/international-development/research/british-society-for-population-studies/awards-and-grants for more details.
  • You can join BSPS at https://www.lse.ac.uk/international-development/research/british-society-for-population-studies/how-to-join

 

Submit online at:

https://forms.office.com/e/T2DTjRRerV


 

50th anniversary conference 2023


The 50th anniversary Conference was held at Keele University, 11-13 September 2023.

BSPS_Timetable_2023 

Information for participants | Keele University travel information

BSPS Annual Conference 2023

11-13 September 2023

Keele University

 

There will be a full programme of simultaneous strand sessions of submitted papers, plus invited plenary sessions with the theme BSPS at 50: looking backwards, looking forwards

Our first plenary will be delivered by Professor Tony Champion FAcSS, emeritus professor of population geography at Newcastle University and former BSPS President, who will look back over developments in population geography over his career with particular insights into migration and residential mobility.

Our other main plenary session will feature three population scholars and practitioners representing different career stages and BSPS constituencies - Dr Louisa Blackwell (ONS), Professor Ridhi Kashyap (University of Oxford) and Dr Bernice Kuang (University of Southampton) - who will have a conversation about new and future developments in British population studies.

The winner of our Early Career Award, Dr Laura Sochas, will complete our plenary line-up.

In addition and as a special 50th Anniversary extra to the programme, Steve Smallwood (ONS) will speak after dinner on the Tuesday evening on the history and activities of the Society.

We are very grateful to Taylor and Francis, the University of Oxford’s Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, the Centre for Population Change – Connecting Generations and Adelphi Genetics Forum for supporting this event.

 LCDS logo web transparent background

CPC_primary

Updates on the Conference will be posted to the BSPS website as available:

https://www.lse.ac.uk/international-development/research/british-society-for-population-studies/annual-conference 

*Information on getting to Keele via various modes of transport can be found on the Keele University website at www.keele.ac.uk/about/howtofindus/ 

Stoke on Trent is the nearest rail station.

Cheaper taxi travel from the station can be obtained by pre-booking, or there are buses at least every half hour during the day.

Local taxi providers are ABC Supreme www.abcsupreme.co.uk and Rosevilles rosevilletaxis.co.uk. 

General and administrative queries: BSPS Secretariat – pic@lse.ac.uk

Ageing_abstracts

CriticalMethods_abstracts

DataScience_abstracts

DevelopmentsOfficialPopStats_abstracts

DisasterDisplacement_abstracts

Environment_abstracts

Ethnicity_abstracts

Families_abstracts

Fertility_abstracts

Health_abstracts

Historical_abstracts

Migration_abstracts

Posters_abstracts

RegionalLocal_abstracts

TellingStory_abstracts

UnintendedConsequences_abstractsStrands and sessions with organisers (who may be contacted with queries):

Download Call for Papers |


Climate change, environmental problems, and population dynamics

Climate change and environmental degradation are some of the most pressing issues facing humanity today. These issues have far-reaching implications for population dynamics and the wellbeing of communities and individuals around the world. As demographers, it is crucial that we understand how climate change and environmental problems affect population growth, migration, fertility, mortality and other demographic processes. At the same time, we must also consider how population dynamics, in turn, influence climate change and environmental degradation, and how these links are affected by various policy measures. Moreover, climate change, environmental problems, but also political interventions disproportionately affect vulnerable populations and exacerbate existing inequalities. 

This strand will also aim to spotlight the differential vulnerability of certain groups and the inequality in potential harms, such as low-income communities, indigenous peoples, and populations in developing countries. 

Strand organisers: Dr. Risto Conte Keivabu (Max Planck Institute of Demographic Research) – Risto.Conte@eui.eu, Dr. Tobias Rüttenauer (UCL) – t.ruttenauer@ucl.ac.uk and Dr. Dermot Grenham – dermot.grenham@gmail.com 

Environment and health in a global perspective

A session on health impacts of environmental exposures such as heat, humidity, and pollution.

Session organiser: Dr. Aashish Gupta (University of Oxford) – aashish.gupta@sociology.ox.ac.uk


Critical methods and new approaches in demography

We invite work that critically engages with demographic methods. In particular, we encourage qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research that furthers our understanding of core demographic concepts, alongside studies that use novel, forward-thinking methodologies and analyses. 

Strand organisers: Michaela Sedovicova (LSE) – m.sedovicova@lse.ac.uk and Joe Strong (LSE) – j.strong3@lse.ac.uk


Data science: innovative data, methods and models

The combination of new sources of data and the increased availability of cheap computing power have opened up exciting new avenues for research in population science. Methodological advances and new statistical modelling approaches allow these new resources to be exploited to create new scientific knowledge and forecast our demographic futures. This strand welcomes papers that demonstrate the application of innovative data, methods and models to problems in the population sciences.  

Demographic applications falling under the following headings are particularly encouraged:

• big data

• innovative statistical modelling and forecasting

• Bayesian methods and uncertainty quantification

• modelling of kinship

• simulation

• machine learning

Strand organiser: Dr. Jason Hilton (University of Southampton) – j.d.hilton@soton.ac.uk

Spatial modelling of demographic outcomes across the world

The space element in regression models can be handled in several ways. Papers can consider the advantages of a particular model, innovations in model types, alternatives to regression, mapping, visualisation, and interaction effects. Papers which take up risk outcomes, hazard models and variables which reflect the Sustainable Development Goals are particularly welcome. The empirical coverage could involve data from any country, including multi-country, multi-level, and microdata studies.

Session organisers: Prof. Wendy Olsen – wendy.olsen@manchester.ac.uk and Dr. Arkadiusz Wisniowski – a.wisniowski@manchester.ac.uk

Digital footprint data for population science

The digital revolution ushered in the 1990s has unleashed a data revolution. Technological advances in computational power, storage and digital network platforms have enabled the emergence of “Big Data” or “digital footprint data”. The unprecedented amount of information that we can now capture through digital technology offers unique opportunities to advance our understanding of micro human behaviour (e.g. individual-level decision making, preferences and choices) and macro population processes (e.g. structural population processes and trends). Digital footprint data offer a continuous flow of information to capture human population dynamics at unprecedentedly fine spatial and temporal resolution in real or near real-time comprising entire social systems. Yet,  the use of digital footprint data also poses major conceptual, methodological and ethical challenges. This session welcomes submissions illustrating the use and potential of digital footprint data, as well as how these data can be used to address some of their key challenges in terms of data biases, representation and ethical concerns.

Session organiser: Francisco Rowe, University of Liverpool fcorowe@liverpool.ac.uk  


Developments in official population statistics

This year the strand is being run in conjunction with the UK Data Service. Contributions to this strand are sought on developments in official series of population statistics, developments in and findings from the 2021/22 censuses and how official population statistics may transform in the future. Papers on the analysis and dissemination of these are also welcome. 

Strand organisers: Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk; Dr. Nigel De Noronha (University of Manchester & UK Data Service) – nigel.denoronha@manchester.ac.uk; Dr. Oliver Duke-Williams (UCL & UK Data Service) – o.duke-williams@ucl.ac.uk


Demography of disaster and displacement contexts

The session seeks to bring together researchers from diverse fields (demography, health, economics, sociology, practitioners) studying population processes and data in disaster- and displacement-affected contexts. Settings could include the war in Ukraine, climatic events, conflict, de facto states, refugees and internal displacement. 

Strand organisers: Rosanna Le Voir (LSE) – R.H.Le-Voir@lse.ac.uk, Prof. Brienna Perelli-Harris (University of Southampton) – B.G.Perelli-Harris@soton.ac.uk and Dr. Orsola Torrisi (LSE) – O.Torrisi@lse.ac.uk


Ethnicity

In this Anniversary year, that coincides with the release of Census ethnic group data for England and Wales and Northern Ireland, papers are invited on any aspect of ethnicity and population studies. ‘Ethnicity’ is broadly conceived and may include work concerned with ethnicity, race, religion, language, migrant generations. Theoretical and methodological papers are welcome, with the intention that the Strand will incorporate work from academic researchers and those in government and the third sector (etc), from postgraduates, early career scholars, and senior colleagues. Our intention is to showcase contemporary population scholarship concerned with ethnicity and stimulate lively debate and connections for our research agendas. 

We invite paper submissions and suggestions for sessions, including using creative formats. 

Papers may address (though are not restricted to):

  • Ethnicity data (and the ‘ethnicity data gap’); ethnicity and censuses
  • Concepts and measurement of ethnicity and race
  • Methods for understanding ethnicity and race
  • Ethnicity and demographic processes: fertility, mortality, partnership, migration
  • Residential segregation and diversity; race and place
  • Ageing and ethnicity
  • Ethnic health inequalities
  • Experiences of ethnic minorities during Covid-19
  • Experiences of ethnic minorities during austerity and ‘cost of living crisis’
  • Geo-demographic ethnicity classifications
  • Estimating and projecting ethnic groups populations
  • Ethnicity and residential mobility
  • Ethnicity and social mobility

Strand organisers: Prof. Nissa Finney (University of St Andrews) – Nissa.Finney@st-andrews.ac.uk and Dr. Gemma Catney (Queen’s University Belfast) – G.Catney@qub.ac.uk


Families and households

This stream invites theory‐driven conceptual or empirical papers (qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods) that investigate the diversity of family or household compositions and outcomes. Comparative papers and case studies are welcome, as are submissions that challenge conventional assumptions and/or contribute to new conceptual and methodological frameworks for household and/or family. For instance, papers that assess the role of selection in known relationships in more detail are invited. 

Examples of possible contributions include, but are not limited to:

  • Trends, determinants and consequences of demographic events
  • Relationships: Union formation, dissolution, relationship quality and satisfaction
  • Family and work: Employment, care and unpaid work
  • Policy related to families and households
  • Heterogeneous effects by e.g. gender, class, income, race/ethnicity, age/cohort, region

Strand organisers: Dr. Jenny Chanfreau (UCL) – j.chanfreau@ucl.ac.uk and Dr. Nitzan Peri-Rotem (University of Exeter) – n.peri-rotem@exeter.ac.uk

Transition to adulthood

This session welcomes papers covering any aspect of the transition to adulthood. Papers can examine any substantive area and/or their intersections (leaving the parental home and migration trajectories; education and employment aspirations and trajectories; sexual initiation, first union formation and partnership & family trajectories) and/or methodological and theoretical aspects related to transition to adulthood in high-, middle- or low-income countries. We particularly encourage the submission of papers which incorporate cross‐national comparisons, sibling comparisons, explore contextual variation, look at ethnic and other socioeconomic differences, explore the impacts of Covid-19, look at the interrelations with health and mental health over the life course, which are policy relevant or use innovative methodological and theoretical approaches. 

Session organisers: Dr. Alina Pelikh (UCL) – a.pelikh@ucl.ac.uk and Dr. Ewa Batyra (CED) – ebatyra@ced.uab.es   


Fertility and reproductive health

This strand welcomes papers covering any aspect of fertility and sexual and reproductive health. Papers can examine any substantive topic and/or methodological aspect related to fertility or reproductive rights and health in high, middle or low‐income countries. We particularly encourage the submission of papers which incorporate cross‐national comparisons, explore the impacts of recent events like cost-of-living crisis, which are policy relevant or use innovative methodological and theoretical approaches. Reproductive health includes a variety of issues which include, but are not limited to, assisted reproductive technology, pregnancy loss, abortion, sexual and reproductive health and rights or contraceptive use. Papers using quantitative or qualitative methods are welcomed.

Strand organisers: Dr. Alyce Raybould (UCL) – a.raybould@ucl.ac.uk, Dr. Alina Pelikh (UCL) – a.pelikh@ucl.ac.uk and Joe Strong (LSE) – j.strong3@lse.ac.uk 

Population policies in post-transition LIMICs

This session includes papers addressing population policies in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) that experienced very below replacement levels of fertility. Papers will address fertility policies including incentives and non-incentives, policies on emerging extra marital fertility, policies on state provision of family planning. These papers collectively will address future population in LMICs within the global population context. 

Session organiser: Prof. Saseendran Pallikadavath (University of Portsmouth) –sasee.pallikadavath@port.ac.uk 

Fertility and uncertainty

Uncertainty plays a significant role in influencing whether or not people will decide to have children and has the potential to influence fertility behaviour in both high and low income countries. This session welcomes papers from all country contexts which study fertility behaviour and decision making in relation to issues such as housing, economics, war and climate change. 

Session organiser:Dr. Sarah Christison (University of St Andrews) – sfc3@st-andrews.ac.uk 


Health and mortality

Papers are invited on any aspect of health and mortality studies. Both papers addressing substantive topics about population health and mortality, as well as methodological development on issues related to health and mortality are welcome. Work from early career scholars, non-academic researchers, and postgraduates is encouraged. The strand’s intention is to showcase scholarship addressing current debates of mortality and health from an international perspective, including work from low-to-middle income countries.

Papers may address (though are not restricted to): 

  • Concepts and measurement of mortality and health
  • Trends in adult health and health behaviours
  • Mortality and health in low-to-middle income countries
  • The environment and population health
  • Social determinants of health and health/mortality disparities
  • Early life health and mortality
  • Data challenges for mortality/health studies
  • Biosocial approaches to mortality differences and healths 

Strand organiser: Dr. José Manuel Aburto (LSHTM & University of Oxford) – jose.aburto@lshtm.ac.uk

There is particular interest in having a session with this theme:

How the Covid-19 pandemic has affected population health & mortality and what are the future challenges brought about by the pandemic (e.g. inequalities, long-covid, forecasting mortality)


Historical demography

This strand welcomes submissions addressing any aspect of historical demography, or the history of demography as an academic discipline. Papers may focus on any of a broad range of themes, such as fertility, mortality, migration, household formation, social mobility, urbanization, public health, social inequality or other related fields in the context of historical populations. Contributions may focus on any part of the world, and at any scale, from local studies to international comparisons. 

Strand organisers: Prof. Eric Schneider (LSE) – E.B.Schneider@lse.ac.uk and Prof. Nicola Shelton (UCL) – n.shelton@ucl.ac.uk


Internal and international migration

We welcome papers addressing any aspect of internal and international mobility and migration including those that focus on trends in and/or the drivers of internal and/or international migration as well as those that are interested in exploring whether and how internal and/or international migration intersects with other life course trajectories such as e.g., partnership formation and dissolution, childbearing, or employment. Papers, which focus on the experiences of immigrants and/or their descendants are also very welcome. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St Andrews) – julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.uk 

Migration as a life-course trajectory

Organised by the IUSSP scientific panel on lifetime migration, this session responds to growing calls to progress beyond a dichotomous approach to the study of migration (migrants vs non-migrants) by recognising that internal and international migration are a complex, repetitive process. We invite papers that showcase recent empirical and methodological advances in: (1) establishing the diversity of migration trajectories over the life course, including circular, return and serial migration (2) determining how migration experiences in early life influence subsequent migration decisions and (3) identifying the cumulative effect of migration life outcomes in later life in the social, economic, family and health domains. 

Session organiser: Dr. Aude Bernard (The University of Queensland) – a.bernard@uq.edu.au 

Residential mobility and housing of immigrants and their descendants in Europe

We invite papers which study the residential and/or housing experiences of immigrants and/or their descendants in one or more European countries. 

Session organiser: Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St Andrews) – julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.uk 


Population ageing and inequalities

In this strand, we call for papers on key questions related to population ageing and inequalities. These might include, for example, papers that address issues arising for older people and their families in mental and physical health; cognition; emotional wellbeing; income, wealth and financial security; social engagement and employment; care provision and receipt; and intergenerational relations. Papers addressing such issues over the life course and investigating how inequality and setbacks in early life are linked to consequences in adulthood and/or later life are also encouraged, as are submissions on the role of policies responses to population ageing (such as active ageing, flexible retirement, social security and long-term services, digital inclusion, and age-friendly society) at the international, national and regional level. Submissions on single regions or countries, cross border and trans-national issues, cross country comparisons, or global perspectives are all welcome, as are those on trends and changes over time. Papers can use qualitative and/or quantitative research methodologies. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Giorgio Di Gessa (UCL) – g.di-gessa@ucl.ac.uk


Posters

Poster submissions are invited across the spectrum of population studies and demography. Researchers are encouraged to present results from completed studies or ongoing research not yet at the results stage (which is particularly well-suited to poster presentation). Presenters are welcome to submit more than one abstract for consideration as a poster, perhaps in addition to an oral submission. Presenters are expected to stand with their posters during the dedicated poster session on the first evening, to discuss their work. Posters can also be posted to the BSPS website in advance of the Conference. There will be a poster prize of £100 in book tokens or equivalent vouchers, at least half of which will be for a student poster. 

Strand organiser: TBC


Recruiting to and teaching demography programmes

Demographic skills are highly important, given the importance of demography for policy, yet the discipline is taught in relatively few undergraduate or postgraduate programmes. This session aims to provide a forum for discussing 1) how to ensure continued recruitment onto those demographic programmes which exist, in order to ensure these important skills are maintained and 2) how demography is being/should be taught in both undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, in order to ensure that those programmes which teach demography are doing so in the most efficient way. 

Session organisers: Prof. Rebecca Sear (LSHTM) – Rebecca.Sear@LSHTM.ac.uk and Dr. Eilidh Garrett – eilidh.garrett@btinternet.com


Regional, subnational and local demography: its impact on policy‐making for places

This strand invites presentations that explore demographic themes at subnational, regional, and local level, particularly in the context of policy-making. Topics might include:

  • The demographics of ‘Levelling Up’.
  • How local demographic trends and variations influence levels of poverty and deprivation, and the provision of local services.
  • How demographic estimates and projections inform planning, policy design and service delivery.
  • Gaps in local data and evidence; alternative sources and novel approaches used to supplement official statistics. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Mark Fransham (University of Oxford) – mark.fransham@spi.ox.ac.uk

 

Local demography

The 2021 Census provides exceptional insight into local demography and provides a launch pad for the transformation of the social statistics system going forward. In this session we’ll look at what the census told us about local demography, how ONS provided new and innovative ways to understand their area. It will also look at how ONS recognise how important localism through investment in the ONS Local initiative and our transformation plans. 

Session organiser: Angeliki Zafeiropoulou (ONS) – angeliki.zafeiropoulou@ons.gov.uk


Telling the story in statistics

This strand invites examples of how you have brought your data to life, made your data discoverable, and/or communicated your results to non-specialists. These could include examples of open data platforms or of how you have found ways of making your messages accessible and reaching a wider audience. 

Session organiser: Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


Unintended consequences of social policy

This session welcomes papers that examine the unintended consequences of social policy on inequalities and demographic outcomes.

Unintended consequences include (1) overshooting original goals, (2) impact of conflicting policies that cancel each other out, or (3) any other negative or positive outcomes that may not have been originally anticipated. Examples of topics include national or cross-national research on policy effects on gender, class, ethnic, or other group inequalities. 

Session organiser: Dr. Kathrin Morosow (University of Manchester)kathrin.morosow@manchester.ac.uk


 

General and administrative queries: BSPS Secretariat – pic@lse.ac.uk

NOTES: 

Submissions are now closed. 

  • Submissions from members & non-members are welcomed, as are those from early-career researchers.
  • Presentations may be allocated to a different strand or session from that to which submission was made.
  • A maximum of TWO submissions please as first author (or presenter for oral presentations).
  • Short abstracts will be posted to the BSPS website (with contact email unless otherwise requested) and may be changed up to the end of July.
  • Oral presentations will be organised into 90-minute sessions of 3-4 papers, with time for questions & discussion. Strand organisers or convenors will advise on the length of individual presentations or advise if a different format is planned.
  • On submission, you will be requested to confirm you plan to present in person.
  • Registration charges will apply for all attending, at member, non-member & student rates. Registration by the presenting author is required before the paper or poster is included in the final programme.
  • Bursaries will be available for student members, or local government members whose employer will not cover their costs & are only available if presenting a paper or poster:
    • Bursary applicants must be current BSPS members, and BSPS annual membership dues must be up to date at the time of application (on the online submission form)
    • The number of bursaries on offer may be limited or partial depending on budgetary constraints, and an application for a bursary does not guarantee it will be successful.
    • Bursaries usually cover registration and on-site accommodation plus meals, but not travel.
    • Bursary recipients may be asked to assist on-site. 

 

BSPS Annual Conference 2022

BSPS Annual Conference 2022 

5-7 September 2022, University of Winchester

BSPS Programme 2022

Abstracts:

Ageing abstracts 2022

Critical demography and qualitative research abstracts

Data Science 2022 Abstracts

Demographic consequences of environment risks abstracts

Developments in official statistics abstracts

Ethnicity abstracts 2022

Families and households abstracts 2022

Fertility abstracts 2022

Health & mortality abstracts 2022

Historical demography abstracts 2022

 Migration abstracts 2022

Population processes & data in crisis & conflict settings abstracts

Poster abstracts 2022

Regional and local demography abstracts

UK Census Longitudinal Studies abstracts


Strands and sessions with organisers  

Ageing and the life course:

Strand organiser: Professor Athina Vlachantoni (University of Southampton) –a.vlachantoni@soton.ac.uk    


Critical demography and qualitative research:

Strand organisers: Professor Ernestina Coast (LSE) – e.coast@lse.ac.uk; Dr. Rishita Nandagiri (LSE) – r.nandagiri@lse.ac.uk; Dr. Sarah Walters (LSHTM) – sarah.walters@lshtm.ac.uk


Data science: Innovative data, methods and models:

Strand organiser: Dr. Jason Hilton (University of Southampton) ‐ J.D.Hilton@soton.ac.uk 

Innovation in fertility forecasting:  

Session organiser: Dr. Joanne Ellison (University of Southampton) – j.v.ellison@soton.ac.uk 

Synthetic data & simulations:

Session organiser: Dr. Paul Norman (University of Leeds) – p.d.norman@leeds.ac.uk


Environment and demography

Session organiser: Dr. Dermot Grenham – dermot.grenham@gmail.com


Sociodemographic disparities in environmental risks

Strand organisers: Risto Conte Keivabu (European University Institute), Dr. Tobias Rüttenauer (University of Oxford) - tobias.ruttenauer@nuffield.ox.ac.uk


Ethnicity:

Strand organisers: Professor Nissa Finney (University of St. Andrews) – nf42@st-andrews.ac.uk ; Dr. Gemma Catney (Queens University Belfast) – g.catney@qub.ac.uk 


Families and households strand:

Strand organisers: Dr. Jenny Chanfreau (UCL) – j.chanfreau@ucl.ac.uk; Dr. Kathrin Morosow (University of Manchester) – kathrin.morosow@manchester.ac.uk 


Fertility and reproductive health:

Strand organisers: Dr. Alina Pelikh (UCL) – a.pelikh@ucl.ac.uk ; Dr. Alyce Raybould (UCL) – a.raybould@ucl.ac.uk 

Fertility trends & patterns in low fertility countries over the past decades: 

Session organiser: Dr. Bernice Kuang (University of Southampton) – b.kuang@soton.ac.uk 


Food systems & food (in)security

Strand organiser: Dr. Jasmine Fledderjohann (Lancaster University) – j.fledderjohann@lancaster.ac.uk


Health and mortality:

Strand organiser: Dr. José-Manuel Aburto –jose-manuel.aburto@sociology.ox.ac.uk

How the Covid-19 pandemic has affected population health & mortality from an international perspective. There is particular interest in having a session with this theme. 


Historical demography:

Strand organisers: Professor Alice Reid (University of Cambridge) - amr1001@cam.ac.uk; Dr. Eilidh Garrett (University of Edinburgh) – eilidh.garrett@btinternet.com 


Internal and international migration:

Strand organisers: Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St Andrews) – julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.uk;  Dr. Ben Wilson (Stockholm University) – ben.wilson@sociology.su.se 


Population processes and data in crisis & conflict settings (Panel session with discussant)

Session organisers:  Rosanna Le Voir and Orsola Torrisi (LSE) - r.h.levoir@lse.ac.uk.torrisi@lse.ac.uk


Posters:

Strand organiser: TBC


Regional, subnational and local demography: its impact on policy‐making for places:

Strand organiser: Dr. Mark Fransham (University of Oxford) – mark.fransham@spi.ox.ac.uk


 

UK Census Longitudinal Studies

Strand organiser: Dr. Ian Shuttleworth (Queens University Belfast) – i.shuttleworth@qub.ac.uk


 Semi-closed sessions not included in online submission form: 

Developments in official population statistics. With contributors expected to be from the public sector, primarily ONS who will lead these sessions. All topics are welcome but there is particular interest in papers relating to Census releases, Census QA, COVID mortality, COVID impacts on data and official population statistics transformation. 

If you would be interested in contributing, please contact co-ordinator directly:

Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


 General and administrative queries: BSPS Secretariat – pic@lse.ac.uk

BSPS virtual conference 2021

BSPS virtual Annual Conference 2021 

13-15 September 2021 

The 2021 Conference was again virtual, building on the experience of the 2020 virtual Conference. 

BSPS Programme 2021

Posters - this link takes you to the posters themselves, accessed via the hyperlink in the title. 

Abstracts can be accessed below. 

Ageing & the life course abstracts

Climate change abstracts

Covid-19 - How demographic analysis can contribute to monitoring of the Covid-19 pandemic & formation of policy abstracts

Data science & data quality abstracts

Developments in official population statistics abstracts

Ethnicity abstracts

Families and households abstracts

Fertility & reproductive health abstracts

Food insecurity abstracts

Health & mortality abstracts

Historical demography abstracts

Migration abstracts

Qualitative demographic research abstracts

Telling the story in statistics abstracts 

Strand organisers

Ageing and the life course:
This strand welcomes submissions of papers relating to ageing over the life course; intergenerational relations and exchange of support; the consequences of ageing for the (e.g. physical, mental, emotional, financial) wellbeing of individuals and their families; qualitative and/or quantitative research methodologies. 

Strand organiser: Professor Athina Vlachantoni (University of Southampton) –a.vlachantoni@soton.ac.uk   

COVID-19 and older people in low and middle-income countries: Submissions are invited which will explore a range of related issues, including the robustness and availability of relevant data and the social determinants of COVID-19 mortality among older populations. 

Convenor: Professor Peter Lloyd-Sherlock (University of East Anglia) –
p.lloyd-sherlock@uea.ac.uk 

Effects of chronic conditions, co-morbidities and multimorbidity on the elderly: The session will focus on the effects of chronic conditions, co-morbidities, and multimorbidity on the daily lives and well-being of the elderly in the UK and internationally. Well-being will be understood broadly. Submissions are welcome on the topics of well-being, elderly time-use, the burden of treatment, or, generally, on the demographic, sociological, medical, and interdisciplinary scholarship of the chronic conditions among the elderly. 

Convenor: Dr. Kamila Kolpashnikova (University of Oxford) - kamila.kolpashnikova@sociology.ox.ac.uk


Climate, the environment and demographic issues:
Climate and environmental change has already had, and threatens to continue to have, a major impact on societies and economies. Demography will not be immune, and we could see significant changes in mortality, health and migration patterns. This session is therefore looking for papers which cover the impact of existing levels of climate change and environmental threats as well as papers which look at the potential future demographic impact of climate change and other environmental issues. 

Strand organiser: Dr Dermot Grenham – dermot.grenham@gmail.com


Covid-19 and demography:
How demographic analysis can contribute to monitoring of the COVID-19 pandemic, the formulation of policy and understanding of the effects. Papers are welcome from both UK-based and international researchers, given the world-wide impact of COVID-19. 

Strand organiser: Professor Emeritus Philip Rees (University of Leeds) –p.h.rees@leeds.ac.uk


Data quality:
This strand welcomes submissions relating to the quality of data inputs and/or outputs and how assurance can be provided of their fitness for purpose: from paradata and metadata to measures of uncertainty. Papers on how COVID-19 has influenced data quality or data quality of COVID-19 surveys are welcome. 

Strand organiser: Phil Humby (Office for National Statistics) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


Data science: Innovative data, methods and models: 
The combination of new sources of data and the increased availability of cheap computing power have opened up exciting new avenues for research in population science. Methodological advances and new statistical modelling approaches allow these new resources to be exploited to create new scientific knowledge and forecast our demographic futures. This strand welcomes papers that demonstrate the application of innovative methods and models to problems in the population sciences. 

Demographic applications falling under the following headings are particularly encouraged:

• big data

• innovative statistical modelling and forecasting

• Bayesian methods and uncertainty quantification

• simulation

• machine learning

• ethical issues in data science research 

Strand organiser: Dr. Jason Hilton (University of Southampton) ‐ J.D.Hilton@soton.ac.uk


Ethnicity: 
In a year that has seen much discussion of ethnicity, inequalities and Black Lives Matter, the Ethnicity Strand returns to BSPS. Papers are invited on any aspect of ethnicity and population studies. ‘Ethnicity’ is broadly conceived and may include work concerned with ethnicity, race, religion, language, migrant generations. Theoretical and methodological papers are welcome with the intention that the Strand will incorporate work from academic and non-academic researchers, from postgraduates and early career scholars to esteemed colleagues. Our intention is to showcase contemporary population scholarship concerning ethnicity and to stimulate lively debate and connections for our research agendas. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Nissa Finney (University of St. Andrews) –
nf42@st-andrews.ac.uk 

Ethnicity and Covid-19. Evidence is emerging, in the UK and elsewhere, about the differential effects of the Covid-19 pandemic across ethnic groups. Papers are invited that demonstrate population scholars’ contribution to this evidence and the associated discussions. Papers may include, but are not limited to, concerns with: health outcomes of ethnic groups, socio-economic experiences of ethnic groups, demographic associates of differential experiences (e.g. age, family context), contextual/structural drivers of Covid-19 ethnic inequalities, spatial variations in experiences of ethnic groups, conceptualisation/theorisation of ethnicity for understanding the impacts of the pandemic, methodological challenges for identifying patters, causes and consequences of ethnic inequalities. Submissions from postgraduates and early career researchers are welcome. 

Convenor: Dr. Nissa Finney (University of St Andrews) – nf42@st-andrews.ac.uk 

Ethnicity and the UK Census: Lessons learnt and prospects for future research. This session welcomes papers from researchers who have utilised ethnicity data from UK or international Censuses. Research should focus on ethnic group (and/or migrant) experiences within population studies fields including (but not limited to): labour markets, education, housing, family/household, partnership, health, ageing, segregation, residential mobility, social mobility. Potential papers may include Census data at any geographical scale (multi-country/national/local), focussing on a single time-point or measuring change over time. Submissions are welcomed that focus on a) insight gained from ethnicity analyses (including policy recommendations); b) possibilities and priorities for future research (e.g. following the release of 2021/2022 UK Census data); c) methodological challenges for ethnicity-Census researchers. 

Convenor: Sarah Garlick (University of Liverpool) –s.l.garlick@liverpool.ac.uk 

Complexities of white ethnic identities: White ethnicity is often neglected as an ethnicity on its own and mostly used as an allegedly neutral reference category, thus normalising majority experiences, overlooking white immigrant experiences, and ‘othering’ ethnic minorities. This session calls for papers that study the complexity of white identities, perceptions and experiences across life domains.

 Convenor: Ivelina Hristova (London School of Economics) – i.hristova@lse.ac.uk


Families and households strand: 
This stream invites theory-driven conceptual or empirical papers that investigate the diversity of family or household compositions and outcomes. Comparative papers and case studies are welcome, as are submissions that challenge conventional assumptions and/or contribute to new conceptual and methodological frameworks for household and/or family. For instance, papers that assess the role of selection in known relationships in more detail are invited.

Examples of possible contributions include, but are not limited to:

· Trends, determinants and consequences of demographic events

· Union formation

· Union dissolution

· Care and unpaid work

· Family and work

· Policy related to families and households

· Heterogeneous effects by e.g. gender, class, income, race/ethnicity, age/cohort, region 

Two related sessions are also inviting submissions on Kinship approaches in demography and Family complexity and child outcomes, as shown below 

Strand organisers: Dr. Kathrin Morosow (University of Bath),Dr. Jenny Chanfreau (University College London) – km937@bath.ac.ukj.chanfreau@ucl.ac.uk 

Family complexity and child outcomes: We invite papers that focus on the link between family complexity and child outcomes, such as physical or mental health, well-being, education, and/or behaviour.

Convenors: Dr. Julia Mikolai and Dr. Katherine Keenan (University of St Andrews) –  julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.uk 

Kinship approaches in demography:

This session lies at the intersection of demography and kinship studies. Potential topics include kin availability and loss, family demography, marriage formation, assortative mating, genealogical studies, simulation studies, etc.

Convenor: Dr.Diego Alburez-Gutierrez - alburezgutierrez@demogr.mpg.de


Fertility and reproductive health: 

This strand welcomes papers covering any aspect of fertility and reproductive health. Papers can examine any substantive topic and/or methodological aspect related to fertility or reproductive health in high, middle- or low-income countries. We particularly encourage the submission of papers which incorporate cross‐national comparisons, which are policy relevant or use innovative methodological and theoretical approaches. Reproductive health includes a variety of issues which include, but are not limited to, assisted reproductive technology, pregnancy loss, sexual and reproductive health and rights or contraceptive use. 

Strand organisers: Dr. Alice Goisis, Dr. Alina Pelikh (University College London) – a.goisis@ucl.ac.uka.pelikh@ucl.ac.uk 

Abortion and abortion-related care. This session invites theoretical contributions on abortion and abortion-related care within demographic scholarship. This can be critical reflections on the conceptualisations and framing of abortions, or methodological or theoretical innovations in research. [Note: this session aims to invite theoretical and not empirical proposals] 

Convenor: Joe Strong (LSE) – j.strong3@lse.ac.uk


Food insecurity 
Food insecurity is associated with a range of negative outcomes across the lifecourse, with serious implications for health, well-being, and economic development. The highest rates of food insecurity globally are found in the Global South--a situation which climate change will continue to exacerbate in the coming years. Moreover, Covid-19 has cast a light on the instability of food systems and has contributed to growing food insecurity globally. The proposed strand would explore topics broadly related to food systems and food insecurity. Proposals focused on the Global South, global food systems, and comparative perspectives would be particularly welcomed. Specific sessions within the strand could include:

Food Insecurity, Food Systems, and Covid-19

Modelling Food Insecurity: Data and Methods

Food Insecurity and Health Across the Lifecourse

Food Insecurity, Inequalities, and Social Policy

Determinants of Food Insecurity

Food Insecurity, Food Systems, and the Environment 

Strand organiser: Dr. Jasmine Fledderjohann (Lancaster University) – j.fledderjohann@lancaster.ac.uk


Health and mortality: 
This strand welcomes papers on health and mortality in high and low income country contexts using quantitative, qualitative and mixed method approaches. Papers can examine any substantive topic and/or methodological aspect related to health and mortality including Covid-19 

Strand organiser: Dr. Stephen Jivraj (University College London) – stephen.jivraj@ucl.ac.uk


Historical demography: 
This strand welcomes submissions addressing any aspect of historical demography, or the history of demography as an academic discipline. Papers may focus on any of a broad range of themes, such as fertility, mortality, migration, household formation, social mobility, urbanization, public health, social inequality or other related fields in the context of historical populations. Contributions may focus on any part of the world, and at any scale, from local studies to international comparisons. 

Strand organisers: Dr. Hanna Jaadla and Dr. Alice Reid (University of Cambridge) – hj309@cam.ac.uk; amr1001@cam.ac.uk


Internal and international migration: 
We invite papers in the following research areas:

1. The analysis of the patterns, processes, impacts, and determinants of international and internal migration. The results of empirical analysis are especially welcome, but topics may also include discussions of conceptual challenges, migration terminologies, data sources and methodological issues.  

2. The study of fertility, family, employment, health, and mortality of migrants and their descendants across countries or in different national settings.

3. The analysis of spatial aspects of population processes, for example, studies analysing spatial patterns of population or investigating contextual effects on demographic processes. 

Strand organisers: Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St Andrews); Dr. Matthew Wallace (Stockholm University) - julia.mikolai@st‐andrews.ac.ukMatthew.wallace@sociology.su.se 

Employment, occupation, and labour market integration of immigrants and their descendants across industrialised countries. We invite papers for this session that cover topics related to the labour market integration and/or the interplay between family and employment trajectories of first- and second-generation immigrants across industrialised countries 

Convenors: Dr. Julia Mikolai and Professor Hill Kulu (University of St Andrews) –Julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.ukhill.kulu@st-andrews.ac.uk


Posters: 
Poster submissions for virtual presentation are invited across the spectrum of population studies and demography. Researchers are encouraged to present results from completed studies or ongoing research not yet at the results stage (which is particularly well-suited to poster presentation). Presenters are welcome to submit more than one abstract for consideration as a poster, perhaps in addition to an oral submission. Posters will be presented as one PowerPoint slide or one PDF of the poster, which will be posted to the BSPS website in advance of the Conference. Each presenter will then have a five-minute slot during a Conference poster session to describe their work and to take questions. There will be a poster prize of £100 in book tokens or vouchers, at least half of which will be for a student poster. 

Strand organiser: TBC


Regional, subnational and local demography: its impact on policy‐making for places: 
This strand invites presentations that explore demographic themes at subnational, regional, and local level, particularly in the context of planning and policy-making. Topics might include: 

  • How local demographic trends and variations influence levels of poverty and deprivation, and the provision of local services.
  • How demographic estimates and projections inform planning, policy design and service delivery.
  • Gaps in local data and evidence; alternative sources and novel approaches used to supplement official statistics.
  • Shifting patterns of residential mobility and preferences, particularly in the context of COVID-19.

Strand organisers: Ben Corr (Greater London Authority), Dr. Mark Fransham (University of Oxford) – ben.corr@london.gov.ukmark.fransham@spi.ox.ac.uk  


Qualitative demographic research: Challenging paradigms? 
This strand invites submissions on qualitative demographic research. This includes a focus on methodological and epistemological implications of qualitative approaches in (and for) demography, as well as contributions reporting/reflecting on the use of qualitative methods in their research. Submissions may grapple with the complexities of presenting such research, as well as confronting the tensions of conducting such research in a largely quantitative discipline. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Rishita Nandagiri (LSE) – r.nandagiri@lse.ac.uk


Telling the story in statistics. 
.This strand invites sessions on you have brought your data to life, made your data discoverable, and/or communicated your results to non-specialists. These could include examples of data visualisation, open data platforms, or of how you have found ways of making your messages accessible and reaching a wider audience. 

We’d also welcome short talks demonstrating/explaining how to do something which relates to data visualisation. 

Strand organiser: Dr. Esther Roughsedge (National Records of Scotland) ‐ esther.roughsedge@nrscotland.gov.uk

BSPS Annual Conference 2020

The BSPS 2020 Conference was a virtual Conference, which took place on Tuesday & Wednesday 15 & 16 September. The priorities were:

  • Dissemination of research findings, most particularly for early-career researchers
  • Feedback on these findings
  • Opportunities to talk & make connections with other researchers

The programme can be downloaded here & abstracts are posted below:

BSPS 2020 programme

Tthere wiere 2 sets of simultaneous sessions each morning, each lasting one hour, with the same in the afternoon. These were a mix of 3-4 paper sessions, with discussion & questions, or flash sessions with shorter presentations (results only, no methods) plus discussion & questions. There wew also two early-career workshops on reviewing for academic journals & postgraduare careers out side academia, plus an early-career plenary & a discussion-based plenary. BSPS memebership was required to participate, but there were no further registration charges. 

To join BSPS or renew your membership, complete one of the forms below: 

Membership application

Membership-renewal-2020

Abstracts: 

Ageing in place abstracts 2020

Critical perspectives in demography and population studies abstracts 2020

Data, big data & statistical uncertainty strand abstracts 2020

Demography Inequality Social Policy abstracts

Developments in Official Population Statistics 2020 abstracts

Early career plenary abstract

Families and households abstracts 2020

Fertility abstracts 2020

Health and mortality abstracts 2020

Health & the environment abstracts 2020

Historical demography abstracts 2020

Migration and mobilities abstracts

Regional subnational & local demography abstracts 2020

Strands & sessions with organisers

Ageing in Place:

Strand Organisers: Dr. Yazhen Yang, Dr. Maja Palmer (University of Southampton) – yazhen.yang@soton.ac.ukmaja.palmer@soton.ac.uk


Critical perspectives in demography & population studies:

Strand Organiser: Dr Rishita Nandagiri (LSE) –r.nandagiri@lse.ac.uk


Data quality:

Strand Organiser: Phil Humby (Office for National Statistics) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk


Data science: Innovative data, methods and models:

Strand Organiser:

    Dr. Jason Hilton (University of Southampton) -

J.D.Hilton@soton.ac.uk

Digital and computational demography:

Organiser: Diego Alburez-Gutierrez (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) - alburezgutierrez@demogr.mpg.de

Understanding statistical uncertainty and error: applying new methods to blended population and migration estimates:

Organiser: Dr. Louisa Blackwell (office for National Statistics) – louisa.blackwell@ons.gov.uk


Demographic impact of climate change:

Organiser: Dr. Dermot Grenham – dermot.grenham@gmail.com


Demography, inequality & social policy:

Strand Organiser: Phil Humby (ONS) – philip.humby@ons.gov.uk

Unintended consequences of social policy:

Organiser: Dr. Kathrin Morosow (University of Bath) – km937@bath.ac.uk


Families & households strand:

Strand Organisers: Dr. Jenny Chanfreau (UCL); Dr. Afshin Zilanawala (UCL) – j.chanfreau@ucl.ac.ukafshin.zilanawala@ucl.ac.uk

Families and work:

Organiser: Dr. Afshin Zilanawala (UCL) – afshin.zilanawala@ucl.ac.uk  

East Asian families: 

Sexual activities in marital relationships in East Asia:

Organisers: Dr.Man-yee Kan and Dr. Muzhi Zhou (University ofxford) -
man-yee.kan@sociology.ox.ac.uk,  muzhi.zhou@sociology.ox.ac.uk

Family and wellbeing in East Asia:

Organisers: Dr. Kamila Kolpashnikova and Dr. Ekaterina Hertog (University of Oxford) - kamila.kolpashnikova@sociology.ox.ac.ukekaterina.hertog@sociology.ox.ac.uk


Fertility & reproductive health:

Strand Organiser: Dr.Heini Väisänen (University of Southampton) – h.e.vaisanen@soton.ac.uk

Later fertility in low fertility countries:

Organiser: Dr. Eva Beaujouan (Wittgenstein Centre for Demography & Global Human Capital) – eva.beaujouan@wu.ac.at


Health & mortality:

Strand Organiser: Dr.Tiziana Leone (London School of Economics) – T.Leone@lse.ac.uk

Life course neighbourhood effects:

Organiser: Dr. Stephen Jivraj (UCL) –stephen.jivraj@ucl.ac.uk


Historical demography:

Strand Organisers: Dr.Hanna Jaadla & Dr. Alice Reid  (University of Cambridge) – hj309@cam.ac.ukamr1001@cam.ac.uk


Internal & international migration:

Strand Organisers: Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St Andrews), Dr. Michael J. Thomas (Statistics Norway)  – julia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.ukMichael.Thomas@ssb.no

Children of immigrants:

Organisers: Dr. Matthew Wallace, Dr. Ben Wilson (University of Stockholm) – matthew.wallace@sociology.su.seben.wilson@sociology.su.se

Immigrant integration across industrialised countries:

Organisers: Professor Hill Kulu, Dr. Júlia Mikolai (University of St. Andrews) – hill.kulu@st-andrews.ac.ukjulia.mikolai@st-andrews.ac.uk

Spatial mobility & immobility: what does moving or not moving mean for social & political attitudes:

Organiser: Dr. Ian Shuttleworth (Queen’s University Belfast) – i.shuttleworth@qub.ac.uk


Regional, subnational and local demography: its impact on policy-making for places

Strand organisers: Ben Corr (Greater London Authority), Dr. Mark Fransham (LSE) – ben.corr@london.gov.ukm.fransham@lse.ac.uk


 Telling the story in statistics:

Organiser: Dr.Esther Roughsedge (National Records of Scotland) - esther.roughsedge@nrscotland.gov.uk

UK Data Service presents data impact stories

IOrganiser: Neil Dymond-Green (UK Data Service, Jisc) neil.dymond-green@jisc.ac.uk

BSPS Annual Conference 2019

BSPS CONFERENCE 2019 - University Hall, Cardiff University 9-11 September 2019

The 2019 BSPS Conference was held at University Hall, Cardiff University, 9-11 September.

Final programme

The plenary theme of the Conference was ‘An ageing population: opportunities and challenges’.   

Plenary speakers were Professor Carol Jagger (Newcastle University, Institute of Ageing), who spoke on The health and care needs of future older populations: opportunity or challenge?

 & Dr. Brian Beach (International Longevity Centre, UK) who spoke on Longevity in research and policy: What happens next?

Slides from both plenary presentations are available here.

The health and care needs.of future older populations

Longevity in research & policy

ABSTRACTS:

Abstracts are presented by session within strands, in the order in which papers are to be presented.

Ageing across the globe abstracts

Data quality abstracts

Developments in official population statistics abstracts

Families and households abstracts

Feminist approaches abstracts

Fertility abstracts

Health and mortality abstracts

Historical abstracts

Innovative data abstracts

Local demography abstracts

Migration mobilities abstracts

Plenary abstracts

Poster abstracts

Telling the story in statistics

Workshops and training sessions 2019

BSPS Annual Conference 2018

Previous conferences (archive from 2017)

2017    2016    2015    2014    2013    2012    2011    2010    2009    2008    2007    2006    2005    2004    2003    2002    2001