Events

III events bring some of the world's biggest academic names to LSE to explore the challenge of global inequality.

Upcoming Events

Flaviana Palmisano

Dynastic measures of intergenerational mobility

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 31 January 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Dr Flaviana Palmisano, Associate Professor of Public Economics, Sapienza University of Rome

Chair:
Dr Pedro Salas-Rojo, Research Officer, LSE III

This seminar suggests a simple and flexible criterion to assess relative intergenerational mobility. It accommodates different types of outcomes, such as (continuous) earnings or (discrete and ordinal) education levels, and captures dynastic improvements of such outcomes at different points of the initial distribution. We suggest an application on Indonesia. Using the IFLS data, we match parents observed in 1993 to their children in 2014, providing one of the rare intergenerational mobility analyses based on a long panel in the context of a developing country.

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What Should Fiscal and Social Policy in a Sustainable Economy Look Like?

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Tuesday 31 January 6.45pm to 8.15pm. Online and in-person public eventSheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building.

Speakers:
Ed Miliband MP, Shadow Secretary of State of Climate Change and Net Zero
Liam Byrne, Labour MP for Birmingham Hodge Hill
Dr Miatta Fahnbulleh, Chief Executive, New Economics Foundation
Dr Andy Summers, Associate Professor of Law, LSE Law School

Chair:
Professor Tony Travers, Director of LSE London

The Tribune Group of Members of Parliament is working alongside LSE, and other experts to propose new Labour Party policy in three priority areas: active government; climate security; and strong communities. Using research evidence and on-the-ground experience, they are looking at how to shape a greener economy and close socioeconomic, health and wellbeing divides in the UK. This panel will discuss whether wealth redistribution policies can help achieve these goals, and how they might help regenerate the economy and empower communities across the UK in a sustainable way.

To attend in-person: No ticket or pre-registration is required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

To attend online: Register for this event via Zoom at: Webinar Registration - Zoom

 

FacultyJamesFoster

Analysing intergenerational mobility with oriented measures and mobility curves

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 7 February 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Professor James Foster, Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, George Washington University 

Chair:
Professor Kirsten Sehnbruch, British Academy Global Professor and Distinguished Policy Fellow, LSE III

This seminar studies oriented measures of intergenerational mobility that differentiate between upward and downward mobility, including headcount ratios that give the incidence of upward (or downward) movements and mobility gaps that gauge the average gain (or loss). We define oriented mobility curves that graphically indicate when mobility comparisons are unambiguous and unanimity partial orderings generated by axiomatically defined classes of oriented measure.

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Biju_photo3Julian Ashwin

Qualitative analysis at scale: An application to aspirations in Cox's Bazaar, Bangladesh

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Monday 13 February 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventNew Academic Building 1.14.

Speakers:
Dr Vijayendra (Biju) Rao, Lead Economist in the Development Research Group of the World Bank
Dr Julian Ashwin, Post-doctoral Researcher, London Business School

Chair:
Dr Paolo Brunori, Assistant Professorial Research Fellow, LSE III

This seminar presents a framework with which to extend a small set of hand-coding to a much larger set of documents using natural language processing and thus to analyse qualitative data at scale. The seminar shows how to assess the robustness of this approach and demonstrates that it can allow the identification of meaningful patterns in the data that the original hand-coded sample is too small to identify. The approach is applied to data collected among Rohingya refugees and their Bangladeshi hosts in Cox’s Bazaar, Bangladesh, to build on work in anthropology and philosophy that distinguishes between ambition and navigational capacity.

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Why the Racial Wealth Divide Matters

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Wednesday 15 February 6.30pm to 8.00pm. Online and in-person public eventHong Kong Theatre, Clement House.

Speakers:
Dr Shabna Begum, Head of Research, The Runnymede Trust
Dr Eleni Karagiannaki, Assistant Professorial Research Fellow, LSE Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE)
Faeza Meyer, Water Justice activist and member of Africa Eco Feminist Collective
Professor Vimal Ranchhod, Professor, School of Economics, University of Cape Town

Chair:
Professor Mike Savage, Martin White Professor of Sociology, LSE Department of Sociology and Research Programme Leader, LSE III

There is increasing evidence that wealth assets play a significant role in allowing social mobility advantages to the children of wealthy households. This event will present new findings underscoring the gravity of the racial wealth divide. Although the historical study of the racialised elements of wealth inequality is widely known, with widely appreciated studies of slavery and imperialism, the contemporary racialisation of wealth inequality needs to be much better known. This event will feature original research conducted by teams at LSE’s International Inequalities Institute reflecting on findings from the UK, South Africa, and elsewhere.

To attend in-person: No ticket or pre-registration is required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

To attend online: Register for this event on Zoom at Why the Racial Wealth Divide Matters

 

Paul Lagneau-Ymonet

Where do the economically powerful come from? Preliminary results from the World Elite Database (WED)

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 28 February 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Dr Paul Lagneau-Ymonet, Leverhulme Visiting Professor, LSE III and Assistant Professor of Sociology, Université Paris Dauphine-PSL

Chair:
Dr Michael Vaughan, Research Officer, LSE III

What are, across countries, the key similarities and differences between the individual characteristics and organisational features that are associated with positions of economic power? The World Elite Database (WED) is a collective endeavour, which consists in the development of comparable datasets. These would allow establishing consistent patterns of regularity to formulate analytical and causal claims to be tested out. In this seminar, I will discuss the challenges my colleagues and I face in constructing the database and present preliminary results the social openness of economic elites.

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Good Work: Measuring the quality of employment

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Thursday 2 March 6.30pm to 8.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Auditorium, Centre Building.

Speakers:
Professor Kirsten Sehnbruch, British Academy Global Professor and a Distinguished Policy Fellow, LSE III
Dr Mauricio Apablaza, Director of Research, School of Government, Universidad del Desarrollo and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE III
Professor James Foster, Oliver T. Carr Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, George Washington University

Chair:
Dr Tania Burchardt, Associate Director, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and Associate Professor, Department of Social Policy, LSE

This event will discuss how poor-quality employment can be defined and measured across a broad range of countries by applying methodologies widely used to measure multidimensional poverty to the labour market. It will further discuss the policy implications and applications of this research, especially in the context of a potential global recession, which may accelerate the impact of technological advances on labour markets. The event will present research from a British Academy Global Professorship on multidimensional quality of employment deprivation hosted by the International Inequalities Institute. 

To attend in-person: No ticket or pre-registration is required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

To attend online: Registration for this event on Zoom will open after 10am on Thursday 9 February.

 

Craig JeffreyJane Dyson

Acting 'As If': proleptic politics in rural North India

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 7 March 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speakers:
Professor Craig Jeffrey, Professor of Human Geography, University of Melbourne
Dr Jane Dyson, Associate Professor of Human Geography, University of Melbourne

Chair:
Professor Alpa Shah, Research Programme Leader, LSE III and Professor in Anthropology, LSE Department of Anthropology

This seminar draws on 20 years of ethnographic field research in rural north India to examine the progressive social and political action of young people. We argue that a significant dimension of young people's practices is a tendency to act 'as if' the surrounding social environment were different, a form of action that has been described as 'proleptic' - anticipating a situation that does not yet exist - and also connects with a wider set of studies on prefigurative politics: being the change you wish to see in the world. We examine why, how and with what implications this proleptic political action is occurring in north India.

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Kaushik Basu

Inequalities Seminar with Kaushik Basu

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 14 March 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Professor Kaushik Basu, C. Marks Professor of International Studies and Professor of Economics, Cornell University

Chair:
Professor Francisco H. G. Ferreira, Amartya Sen Professor of Inequality Studies and Director, LSE III

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Inequality of Opportunity in South Asia

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 21 March 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Professor Vito Peragine, Professor of Economics, University of Bari

Chair:
Dr H. Xavier Jara, Research Officer, LSE III

This seminar studies the extent, the evolution and the sources of inequality of opportunity in six Countries in the south asian region, by focusing on two main individual outcomes: education and consumption

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Richard Reeves

Of Boys and Men: New challenges for gender equality

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Thursday 23 March 6.30pm to 8.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Auditorium, Centre Building.

Speakers:
Dr Richard V. Reeves, Senior Fellow in Economic Studies and Director of the Future of the Middle Class Initiative, Brookings Institution
Dr Abigail McKnight, Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), LSE

Chair:
Professor Nicola Lacey, School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy, LSE Law School

Profound economic and social changes of recent decades have left many men at a disadvantage in these areas. Many previous attempts to treat this condition have made the same fatal mistake - of viewing the problems of men as a problem with men. In his new book, Richard V Reeves explores how the male malaise is the result of deep structural challenges and societal issues. Richard draws on a careful analysis of social, economic, and demographic trends; current discussions on gender in psychology, public policy, economics and sociology; as well as on interviews with men and women, girls and boys.

To attend in-person: No ticket or pre-registration is required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

To attend online: Registration for this event on Zoom will open after 10am on Thursday 2 March.

 

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“Politics After the Pandemic”: Public Ethnography in the Era of the Podcast

Part of the III Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 28 March 12.00pm to 1.00pm. Online and in-person public eventThe Marshall Building - MAR 1.09.

Speaker:
Dr Erica Lagalisse, Visiting Fellow, LSE III

Chair:
Dr Shalini Grover, Research Fellow, LSE III

Politics After the Pandemic is a podcast of The Sociological Review where anthropologist and social movements researcher Erica Lagalisse thinks transnationally with social scientists and political activists about recent cultural shifts in their relation to Covid-19, capitalism and other structures of oppression, and how social movements, educators and researchers might respond. In this seminar, Lagalisse presents the first episodes of the Politics After the Pandemic series on “conspiracy theory” as a case study to explore the ethnographic and transnational methodologies of Politics After the Pandemic, exploring the challenges of public ethnography in general and the possibilities and limits of the podcast genre in particular—whose growing prevalence is another feature of politics after the pandemic. Information will also be given about how to participate in Politics After the Pandemic, and researchers who work on relevant topics are invited to attend for this reason as well.

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Previous Events

Catch up on all of our past events here.