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    John Worrall (LSE): “Evidence-Based Everything (but let’s do the basing properly)” (Exaugural Lecture)

John Worrall (LSE): “Evidence-Based Everything (but let’s do the basing properly)” (Exaugural Lecture)

19 October 2018|

 

John Worrall (LSE): “Evidence-Based Everything (but let’s do the basing properly)” (Exaugural Lecture)

Statements can be significant despite being “statements of the bleedin’ obvious”. The philosopher David Hume’s remark that “The rational man adjusts his beliefs to the evidence” falls exactly into this category. It is surely “bleedin’ obvious” that our views (and hence our policies) ought to be based […]

Matt Farr (Cambridge): “The C Theory of Time”

30 April 2018|

 

Matt Farr (Cambridge): “The C Theory of Time”

Does time have a direction? Intuitively, it does. After all, our experiences, our thoughts, even our scientific explanations of phenomena are time-directed: things evolve from earlier to later, and it would seem unnecessary and indeed odd to try to expunge such talk from our philosophical lexicon. Nevertheless, in this talk […]

John D. Norton (Pittsburgh): “The Infinite Lottery”

24 April 2018|

 

John D. Norton (Pittsburgh): “The Infinite Lottery”

An infinite lottery machine induces a non-standard inductive logic that turns out to be the same logic appropriate to a problem in inductive inference arising in present theories of eternal inflation.

John D. Norton is Distinguished Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, and author of the […]

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    Tudor M Baetu (Bristol): “Pain in Psychology, Biology and Medicine. Implications for Eliminativist and Physicalist Accounts” (BSPS Lecture)

Tudor M Baetu (Bristol): “Pain in Psychology, Biology and Medicine. Implications for Eliminativist and Physicalist Accounts” (BSPS Lecture)

12 March 2018|

 

Tudor M Baetu (Bristol): “Pain in Psychology, Biology and Medicine. Implications for Eliminativist and Physicalist Accounts” (BSPS Lecture)

An analysis of arguments for pain eliminativism reveals two significant points of divergence between assumptions underlying scientific research on pain and assumptions typically endorsed by physicalist accounts. The first concerns the status of the term ‘pain’, which is an […]

The Evolution of Altruism (the Forum)

24 February 2018|

 

The Evolution of Altruism (the Forum)

If evolution is a ‘struggle for existence’, why do we witness so much altruism in nature? From bacteria to baboons, the natural world is full of spectacular examples of organisms cooperating with one another. In the early 1960s, W. D. Hamilton changed the way we think about how such behaviour evolves, […]

Anna Alexandrova (Cambridge): “Defining Mental Health”

20 February 2018|

 

Anna Alexandrova (Cambridge): “Defining Mental Health”

Today mental health is a universally valued outcome. It is prioritised by governments, hospitals, schools, employers, charities. And yet mental health appears to be prized more as a label than as a concept, because remarkably for a state so uncontroversially prized, it has no accepted definition. In this talk based on joint […]

What Is It Really Like to Be a Bat? (the Forum)

14 February 2018|

 

What Is It Really Like to Be a Bat? (the Forum)

Are bats conscious, and how can we tell? What is it like to use sound to navigate? In a classic paper called “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?”, Thomas Nagel used the bat’s capacity for echolocation to introduce philosophical problems concerning conscious experience. But […]

2015 and 2016 Lakatos Award Lectures

9 November 2017|

 

2015 and 2016 Lakatos Award Lectures with Thomas Pradeu and Brian Epstein

Thomas Pradeau is a Senior Investigator in Philosophy of Science at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), he was awarded the 2015 Lakatos Award for his book The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. The book was praised by the Award Selectors as “a […]

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    Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

4 October 2017|

 
Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

Using economics as an example, this lecture addresses a perennial philosophical question that also occupied Auguste Comte: Can inquiries into social phenomena be sciences?

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    David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

7 June 2017|

 

David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

This talk was recorded at the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science’s interdisciplinary workshop on the origins of consciousness, which brought together philosophers, neuroscientists, experimental biologists and evolutionary biologists.