Hugh Mellor (Cambridge): “Chances and Conditionals”

17 January 2018|

 

Hugh Mellor (Cambridge): “Chances and Conditionals”

In a projected book, “Most Counterfactuals Are False”, Alan Hájek infers the truth of its title from the ubiquity of chance. I argue in this talk that he is wrong: the ubiquity of chance does not verify his title: chances do not falsify counterfactuals. Single-case chances are perfectly consistent with determinism, i.e. […]

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    Mike Otsuka (LSE): “Reciprocity versus Redistribution: The Case of Collective Pensions”

Mike Otsuka (LSE): “Reciprocity versus Redistribution: The Case of Collective Pensions”

10 January 2018|

 

Mike Otsuka (LSE): “Reciprocity versus Redistribution: The Case of Collective Pensions”

Pensions involve transfers from those who are young, healthy, able-bodied, and productive to those who are elderly, infirm, and out of work. Are these justified as redistributive transfers between distinct individuals – from those who are lucky to others who are unlucky – in order to eliminate […]

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    Remco Heesen (Cambridge): “Statistical Biases in Peer Review”

Remco Heesen (Cambridge): “Statistical Biases in Peer Review”

29 November 2017|

 

Remco Heesen (Cambridge): “Statistical Biases in Peer Review”

Various biases are known to affect the peer review system, which is used to judge journal articles for their suitability for publication and grant proposals for their suitability for funding. These biases are generally attributed to cognitive biases held by individual peer reviewers. For example, gender bias in peer review […]

2015 and 2016 Lakatos Award Lectures

9 November 2017|

 

2015 and 2016 Lakatos Award Lectures with Thomas Pradeu and Brian Epstein

Thomas Pradeau is a Senior Investigator in Philosophy of Science at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), he was awarded the 2015 Lakatos Award for his book The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. The book was praised by the Award Selectors as “a […]

Alex Voorhoeve (LSE): “Egalitarianism under Ambiguity”

8 November 2017|

 

Alex Voorhoeve (LSE): “Egalitarianism under Ambiguity”

Decision-makers are in an ambiguous situation when they are not in a position to assign precise probabilities to all of the relevant possible outcomes of their actions. Such situations are common – novel medical treatments and policies addressing climate change are two examples. Many people respond to ambiguous situations in a cautious, or […]

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    Max Steuer (LSE): “Expertise in Well-Defined Problems and Expertise in Ill-Defined Problems in Economics”

Max Steuer (LSE): “Expertise in Well-Defined Problems and Expertise in Ill-Defined Problems in Economics”

1 November 2017|

 

Max Steuer (LSE): “Expertise in Well-Defined Problems and Expertise in Ill-Defined Problems in Economics”

This paper argues that while expertise in ill-defined economic problems benefits from some level of expertise in well-defined problems, the two kinds of expertise are not the same. Expertise in ill-defined problems requires different skills. It is important for applied economics to […]

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    Owen Griffiths (LSE): “Isomorphism invariance and overgeneration”

Owen Griffiths (LSE): “Isomorphism invariance and overgeneration”

24 October 2017|

 

Owen Griffiths (LSE): “Isomorphism invariance and overgeneration”

The isomorphism invariance criterion of logical nature has much to commend it. It can be philosophically motivated by the thought that logic is distinctively general or topic neutral. It is capable of precise set-theoretic formulation. And it delivers a plausible extension of ‘logical constant’ which respects the intuitively clear cases. Despite […]

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    Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

4 October 2017|

 
Prof Daniel M. Hausman (Madison): “Is Social Science Possible?”

Using economics as an example, this lecture addresses a perennial philosophical question that also occupied Auguste Comte: Can inquiries into social phenomena be sciences?

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    David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

7 June 2017|

 

David Papineau (King’s College London): “Thinking about Animal Consciousness”

This talk was recorded at the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science’s interdisciplinary workshop on the origins of consciousness, which brought together philosophers, neuroscientists, experimental biologists and evolutionary biologists.

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    Chris Frith (University College London): “What’s the Use of Consciousness?”

Chris Frith (University College London): “What’s the Use of Consciousness?”

7 June 2017|

 

Chris Frith (University College London): “What’s the Use of Consciousness?”

This talk was recorded at the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science’s interdisciplinary workshop on the origins of consciousness, which brought together philosophers, neuroscientists, experimental biologists and evolutionary biologists.