Events

Orbán's Hungary: an exception or a role model for Central and Eastern Europe?

Hosted by the European Institute

Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building ,

Speaker

Paul Ledvai

Paul Ledvai

Chair

Abby Innes

Abby Innes

Celebrated journalist Paul Lendvai, sketches the extraordinary rise of Hungarian Prime Minister Orbán, an erstwhile anti-communist rebel turned populist autocrat. His compelling portrait reveals a man with unfettered power.

Orbán’s ambitions are far-reaching. Hailed by governments and far-right politicians as the champion of a new anti-Brussels nationalism, his ruthless crackdown on refugees, his open break with normative values and his undisguised admiration for Presidents Putin and Trump pose a formidable challenge to the survival of liberal democracy in a divided Europe.

Paul Lendvai is a Hungarian-born Austrian journalist who worked as a correspondent for the Financial Times for more than two decades. He is the author of Hungary: Between Democracy and Authoritarianism;  Inside Austria: New Challenges, Old Demons; and Blacklisted: A Journalist’s Life in Central Europe.

Abby Innes is Assistant Professor of Political Economy at the LSE European Institute. 

The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

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