Dr Ulises  Moreno-Tabarez

Dr Ulises Moreno-Tabarez

Postdoctoral Associate

Department of Geography and Environment

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Languages
English, Spanish
Key Expertise
Black and Indigenous Geographies, Plantation Ecologies

About me

Ulises is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Geography and Environment. He is also a Research Associate for LSE London and Associated Academic at the Latin American and Caribbean Centre. He serves as a core Editor of the peer-reviewed academic journal City: Analysis of Urban Change, Theory, Action. He holds a PhD in Human Geography and Urban Studies from the LSE.

Prior to this degree, Ulises completed a B.A. and M.A. in Performance Studies and Rhetoric from the California State University, Los Angeles. His PhD research project examined critically the relationship between small charities, government policy, and migrants in London—with particular focus on Latin American migrants. His thesis, ‘Spectral Latinidad: the work of Latinx and small charities in London’, documents how charity users and volunteers produce Latinidad in London, how small charities work to politicise these performances, and how successive central governments' policies have continually stifled the work of small charities.

His current research project further develops what he calls spectral geographies, spatial politics and poetics of presence and absence concerning political-ecological and cultural lifescapes. He uses ethnographic and participatory research methods to examine how human-nature relationships are re-negotiated due to climate change and state deployments of race and ethnicity. In this vein, one of his core concerns is the historical developments of Blackness and Indigeneity as intertwined spectral subjectivities, remnants of slavery and colonialism, that evince Afro-Indigenous wilful lifeways, creative resistance against plantation logics embedded in infrastructural violence.

Expertise Details

Migration and Border Studies; Performance and performativity; Spectral spatialities; Cultural 'Anthropocene'