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International Development Events

Join the global debate


The department is involved in hosting an extensive series of events, ranging from research seminars to public lectures.

Our department has hosted a number of high profile speakers including: Winnie Byanyima, Professor Amartya Sen, Dr Ha-Joon Chang, Dr Qaiser Khan, and Alcinda Honwana.

Upcoming events

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Tuesday 10 October 2017, 13:00-14:30

The Death Penalty and its Injustices Panel Discussion and Q&A
With screening of scenes from 14 Days in May

Venue: Graham Wallas Room (Fifth floor, Old Building, LSE)
Speakers: Clive Stafford Smith,  Paul Hamann and Yemi Hailemariam
Chair: Dr Sharon Shalev

What challenges are faced in campaigning against the Death penalty?
What progress has been made with regard to abolishing capital punishment?
What is it like to work for a human rights NGO?

What global changes have been made to the death penalty?

The event “The Death Penalty and its Injustices” will seek to answer these questions, and explore the work carried out against capital punishment.

May 2017 saw the 30th anniversary of the ground-breaking documentary 14 Days in May, a film which follows Edward Earl Johnson, a man sentenced to death in America, in the two weeks leading up to his execution in 1987. Convicted of the murder of a white police officer, Edward protested his innocence until his death. Produced and directed by Reprieve’s Patron Paul Hamann for the BBC, the film crew were given unprecedented access to the prison warden, guards and chaplain, and to Edward and his family. Reprieve founder, Clive Stafford Smith represented Edward on his final appeals and fought to save his life up to the moment of his execution.

To mark World against the Death Penalty Day, LSE will hold a special panel for LSE staff and students in conjunction with Reprieve. The Department of International Development is honoured to host Paul Hamann, Clive Stafford Smith and Yemi Hailemariam who will discuss 14 days in May, their work fighting capital punishment, and how the death penalty landscape has changed over the 30 years. They will also answer questions from the audience.

About the panel:
Clive Stafford Smith is the founder of Reprieve. He oversees Reprieve’s casework programme, as well as the direct representation of clients in Guantánamo Bay and on death row. In 2000 he was awarded the OBE for humanitarian services and in 2009 Clive was ranked 6th on the list of Britain’s Most Powerful Lawyers (The Times, July 2009)

Paul Hamann is a co-founder and patron of Reprieve.He is the former head of BBC Documentaries & History and has received a BAFTA for Best Documentary Series and the BFI’s Grierson Award for 14 Days in May.
Paul runs his own independent production company, Wild Pictures, and is responsible for many acclaimed, high-rating, prime-time series and one offs for ITV, BBC and Channel 4.

Yemi Hailemariamis the partner of Andy Tsege, a prominent figure in Ethiopian politics who, in June 2014, was kidnapped and rendered to Ethiopia on the command of the Ethiopian government, as part of a brutal crackdown on political opponents and civil rights activists. Yemi leads the campaign to get him home to her and their children.

About the chair:
Dr Sharon Shalev is Research Associate at the Centre for Criminology at Oxford University and an Associate at the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE. Her key research interest is the use of solitary confinement in prisons and she has authored many publications on the subject including the influential Sourcebook on Solitary Confinement, and an award winning book, Supermax: controlling risk through solitary confinement (2009).

The event is free and open to LSE staff and students only.

 


 

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Doughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st century economist

Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE
Speaker: Kate Raworth
Discussant: Professor Oriana Bandiera
Chair: Duncan Green 

Economics matters. Its theories are the mother tongue of public policy, the rationale for multi-billion-dollar investments, and the tools we use to tackle global poverty and manage our planetary home. Pity then – or more like disaster – that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date, but still dominate decision-making for the future. Instead of criticising the past, this book takes the long view forwards, identifying seven insights to help the twenty-first-century economist bring humanity into the global sweet spot (shaped like a doughnut) that combines human prosperity with ecological sustainability.

The Department of International Development is proud to be hosting Kate Raworth (@KateRaworth), Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute and Senior Associate of the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, as well as the author of Doughnut Economics, Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist.

Kate will present her book that dares to take on the mainstream economics establishment with a radical rewrite of 200 years of theory. Using humour and metaphor, but always deeply grounded in the theory itself she offers a new model for a green, fair and thriving global economy. It promises that the economic future will be fascinating, but wildly unlike the past, if we equip ourselves with the mindset needed to take it on.

Oriana Bandiera is Professor of Economics, LSE.

Duncan Green (@fp2p) is Senior Strategic Advisor at Oxfam UK and Professor in Practice at LSE. He is the author of the From Poverty to Power blog and How Change Happens

The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) promotes interdisciplinary post-graduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change.

Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEdoughnut

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or by calling 0207 955 6043.

 

Past events

2017

Monday 10 July 2017, 7-9pm

The Role of Higher Education in Ensuring Afghanistan's Prosperous Future

Speakers: Dr Kenneth Holland and Said Tayeb Jawad
Chair: Dr Sajjan Gohel
Co-chair: Yalda Hakim

Afghanistan stands at a crossroad. The investment in blood and treasure by the international community and continued sacrifices by the Afghans to seek a peaceful and prosperous future is now at stake after the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO troops. As the country faces a resurgent Taliban and other global terrorist groups, weak state institutions and lack of good governance further compound the situation. What role is there for the institutions of higher education to build the human capital necessary to place the country on a secure and stable path? Does Afghanistan need a generational transition of power and politics to ensure good governance and build state institutions? What role can the UK and the wider international community play to support Afghanistan in this critical juncture?


 

Monday 3 July 2017, 4-6pm

Supporting Mining Firms to Contribute to Development

Speakers: Luke Balleny and Jeff Geipel
Chair: Professor James Putzel

International Development is excited to host a discussion of a new initiative focused on improving the economic impact of mineral extraction. The initiative, which has its roots in the Development Studies programme, aims to improve “backward economic linkages” from the mining industry in eveloping countries.

Mining Shared Value (MSV), a venture of Engineers Without Borders Canada, in collaboration with Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, will present their new “Mining Local Procurement Reporting Mechanism (LPRM)” that seeks to address the gaps in current reporting frameworks and sustainability systems. 

 


 

Tuesday 20 June 2017, 6.30pm-8pm

International Law and New Wars

Speaker: Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor Mary Kaldor and Dr Javier Solana

This event launches Christine Chinkin and Mary Kaldor's new book International Law and New Wars, which examines how international law fails to address the contemporary experience of what are known as 'new wars' - instances of armed conflict and violence in places such as Syria, Ukraine, Libya, Mali, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan. International law, largely constructed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, rests to a great extent on the outmoded concept of war drawn from European experience - inter-state clashes involving battles between regular and identifiable armed forces. The book shows how different approaches are associated with different interpretations of international law, and, in some cases, this has dangerously weakened the legal restraints on war established after 1945. It puts forward a practical case for what it defines as second generation human security and the implications this carries for international law.

 


 

Sunday 11 to Sunday 18 June 2017

Senior-level Course on Conflict and Humanitarian Response

An intensive course for humanitarian professionals taught by the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) and London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

The course provides an opportunity for mid-career and senior professionals to learn and reflect on critical issues in preparing for, responding to and transitioning out of humanitarian crises. The course is designed to foster peer-to-peer learning, and will feature lectures by distinguished academics and practitioners, with an opportunity for small group discussions and exercises.

 


 

Tuesday 9 May 2017, 6pm-8pm

After Rape: Violence, Justice and Social Harmony in Uganda

Speaker: Holly Porter, Adam Branch
Chair: Professor Tim Allen

This event, hosted by Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, marks the publication of Holly Porter’s new book After Rape: violence, justice and social harmony in Uganda.

Drawing upon abundant fieldwork and in-depth interviews with almost 200 women, Holly Porter examined issues surrounding wrongdoing and justice, and sexual violence and rape, among the Acholi people in northern Uganda. This intricate exploration offered evidence of a more complicated and nuanced explanation of rape and its aftermath, suggesting a re-imagining of the meanings of post-atrocity justice, whilst acknowledging the role of sex, power and politics in all sexual experiences between coercion and consent.

 


 

Thursday 4 May 2017, 6-7.30pm

Beyond austerity and stimulus: making employment and growth more sustainable by broadening capital ownership using the earnings of capital

Speaker: Professor Robert Ashford 
Chair: Professor Robert Wade

About the event:

Since the Great Recession, the economic policy debate has converged on Austerity vs Stimulus (neoclassical vs. Keynesian theory). Advocates of both strategies (1) concede that the world’s major economies are not operating at full employment and (2) seek to promote (a) sustainable fuller employment and (b) enhanced earnings of poor and middle-class people. 

Professor Ashford offered a different strategy (widening competitive opportunities for capital acquisition with the earnings of capital) based on a different theory of fuller employment: The prospect of more broadly distributed capital earnings in future years provides market incentives to profitably employ more labor and capital in earlier years.  Unlike Keynesian theory, Ashford’s approach operates in both the short and long run and requires no redistribution through tax and transfer mechanisms.

 


 

Monday 20 March, 12.30-2pm

Richard Falk book launch - Palestine's Horizon: Toward a Just Peace

Speaker: Professor Richard Falk
Discussants: Chris Doyle
Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor

About the event:

Richard Falk, former UN Special Rapporteur for Palestine (2008-2014), has dedicated much of his life to the study of the Israel/Palestine conflict.

His book Palestine's Horizon explores the intricacies and interconnections of the history and politics of Israel/Palestine. After enduring years of violent occupation, the Palestinian movement is exploring different avenues for peace. These include the pursuit of rights under international law in venues such as the UN and International Criminal Court, and the new emphasis on global solidarity and non-violent militancy embodied by the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Campaign, among others.

Falk refutes the notion that the Palestinian struggle is a ‘lost cause’ by focusing on new tactics of resistance. He also reflects on the legacy of Edward Said, drawing on the importance of his humanist thought. Against this background, he provides a vision of peace that is mindful of the formidable difficulties of achieving a just solution to the long conflict.

 


 

Wednesday 8 March, 12-2pm

DESTIN - QA session with Ha-Joon Chang

Speaker: Ha-Joon Chang 
Chair: Duncan Green

About the event:

DESTIN has the pleasure of hosting world-renowned development economist Ha-Joon Chang who will be answering questions posed to him by students and members of staff from the department.

 


 

Wednesday 1 March, 5.30-7pm

The Evolving US Foreign Aid Model: Results, Innovation, and Uncertainty

Speaker: John L. Simpkins

About the event:

In the past 30 years, American foreign aid has shifted from direct provision of technical assistance to contracting and grant making for technical assistance. John Simpkins will discuss the prospects for further innovation in US foreign assistance, including technological innovation and impact investing in clean energy and other sectors.  He will also reflect on the impact made by different Presidential administrations.

 


 

Tuesday 28 February, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

The Quest for Universal Social Policy in the South

Speaker: Diego Sánchez-Ancochea     
Discussants: Tasha Fairfield and Professor Anthony Hall
Chair: Professor Kenneth Shadlen

About the event:

Universal social policies have the power to reduce inequality and create more cohesive societies. But how can countries in the South deliver universalism? Diego Sánchez-Ancochea (together with Juliana Martínez Franzoni) answers this question through a comparative analysis of Costa Rica, Mauritius, South Korea, and Uruguay, and a detailed historical account of Costa Rica's successful trajectory in a new book.

Against the backdrop of democracy and progressive parties, he places at centre stage the policy architectures defined as the combination of instruments that dictate the benefits available to people. The volume also explores the role of state actors in building pro-universal architectures. The event will interest advanced students and scholars of human development and public and social policies, as well as policymakers eager to promote universal policies across the South. 

 


 

Monday 27 February, 6pm - 7.30pm

‘Seven Myths that sustain the global arms trade’ 

Panel: Paul Holden and Andrew Feinstein (Corruption Watch UK), Nick Gilby (author and researcher), Alex de Waal (World Peace Foundation) and Leah Wawro (Transparency International) and Sam Perlo-Freeman (World Peace Foundation).     
Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor

About the event:

Although there is often opposition to individual wars, most people continue to believe that the arms industry is necessary in some form: to safeguard our security, provide jobs and stimulate the economy. Not only conservatives, but many progressives and liberals, support it for these reasons.

JSRP will host a panel discussion, to launch the new book: ‘Indefensible: 7 myths that sustain the global arms trade‘ (Paul Holden et al, Zed Books).  Indefensible puts forward a devastating challenge to this conventional wisdom on the global arms trade, which has normalised the existence of the most savage weapons of mass destruction ever known. It is the essential handbook for those who want to debunk the arguments of the industry and its supporters: deploying case studies, statistics and irrefutable evidence to demonstrate they are fundamentally flawed, both factually and logically.

Far from protecting us, the book shows how the arms trade undermines our security by fanning the flames of war, terrorism and global instability. In countering these myths, the book points to ways in which we can combat the arms trade’s malignant influence, reclaim our democracies and reshape our economies.

2016

Wednesday 16 November, 6-8pm (Recording)

Bangladesh Confronts Climate Change: Keeping our heads above water

Speaker: Joseph Hanlon and Manoj Roy
Chair: Prof. Tim Forsyth

About the event:

Joseph Hanlon and Manoj Roy will present their new book which tells the story of a country that refuses to be a helpless victim.

Climate change will make cyclones and floods more devastating; sea level is already rising. Bangladeshi officials, scientists and communities know what is coming and are already adapting, based on their experience of living with a very difficult environment. Cyclone shelters and warning systems now save tens of thousands of lives. Locally developed rice varieties mean Bangladesh is a rice exporter; newer varieties adapt to climate change. And coastal communities have found how to raise the land to match sea level rise.

Bangladeshis will keep their heads above water - if industrialised countries curb greenhouse gas emissions. Bangladeshi negotiators have been fighting for more than a decade to keep global warming below 1.5ºC, and to demand that industrialised countries pay for damage already done. They will be playing an important role in the annual climate change negotiations (COP 22) 7-18 November. 

 


 

Tuesday 1 November, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

How Change Happens

Speaker: Duncan Green     
Discussant: Naila Kabeer
Chair: Hugh Cole

About the event:

The IGC and the LSE Department of International Development will be jointly hosting a public discussion on 1st November featuring Duncan Green, Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB and author of the well-known blog “From Poverty to Power: how active citizens and effective states can change the world”.

He will present his new book “How change happens”, focused on how change happens in political systems, power, and institution as well as the role of individuals and organisations in influencing that change.
Duncan will also discuss the challenges that ‘systems thinking’ creates for traditional aid practices, and how a ‘power and systems approach’ requires activists, whether in campaigns, companies or governments, to fundamentally rethink the way they understand the world and try to influence it.
Naila Kabeer, Professor of Gender and Development at LSE, will be the discussant; Hugh Cole, IGC Country Director, will chair the discussion.

 


 

Tuesday 31 May, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

Stop Bombing Hospitals: Medecins Sans Frontieres and the protection of medical space

Speaker: Vickie Hawkins                                                               Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor 

About the event:
With attacks on medical personnel and infrastructure an increasing feature of today's conflicts, how do humanitarian organisations uphold the norms of International Humanitarian Law? 

MSF has witnessed first-hand the impact that violations have on the civilian population and infrastructure including their own facilities.  Following the Agenda for Humanity, proposed at the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit, Vickie Hawkins, General Director of MSF UK, will explore the changes that have been proposed to strengthen the laws of war and the challenges that humanitarians face to ensure that hospitals, medical centres and medical staff are protected in times of war.

 


 

Wednesday 27 April, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

Today We Drop Bombs, Tomorrow We Build Bridges: how foreign aid became a casualty of war

Speakers: Peter Gill                                                                       Chair: Professor Craig Calhoun 

About the event:
In his latest book Peter Gill reveals how the ‘war on terror’ has ravaged the independence and neutrality of humanitarian aid, with serious consequences for relief operations. Focusing on Turkey, Afghanistan, Somalia and Pakistan he explains how western counter-terror laws are restricting humanitarian relief operations and costing lives


 

Wednesday 16 March, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

Fraud at polls: can journalists and statisticians check? The Mozambican experience

Speakers: Dr Johan Ahlback, Dr Joseph Hanlon                         Discussant: Jouni Kuha                                                                 Chair: Wendy Willems

About the event:

In every Mozambican election, the ruling party (Frelimo) won, and the opposition cried fraud. Can we tell who really won? Teams of up to 150 journalists, organized by Joe Hanlon, covered the elections across the country and reported that fraud and misconduct did occur. But did it change the outcome? Mozambique reports results from each polling station (each with fewer than 1000 voters) which allows statistical analysis for ballot box stuffing, invalidating opposition votes, and other misconduct. Johan Ahlback and Joseph Hanlon discuss this unique project to put the journalists and statisticians together - and test the official outcome of five presidential elections.

 


 

Thursday 4 February, 6:30-8pm (Recording)

Going beyond 'dangerous' climate change

Speakers: Professor Kevin Anderson
Chair: Professor Tim Dyson

About the event:

Despite high-level statements to the contrary, there is little to no chance of maintaining the global mean surface temperature increase at or below 2 degrees Celsius. Moreover, the impacts associated with 2°C have been revised upward sufficiently so that 2°C now more appropriately represents the threshold between 'dangerous' and 'extremely dangerous' climate change. 


 

Wednesday 3 February 2016, 6.30-8pm (Recording)

One Second of Light

Speakers: Giles Duley
Chair: Stuart Gordon

About the event:

One Second of Light is Duley’s latest book, covering his work on the effects of conflict and humanitarian disaster over the last decade. Duley’s work has mostly been in partnership with NGO’s and charities, such as EMERGENCY UK. Duley will talk about the relationship and the role of photography in advocacy and raising awareness.

 


 

Tuesday 26 January 2016, 6.30-8pm

Building Houses on Sand:Social Protection Systems and Precarious Labour Markets in Developing Countries

Speakers: Kirsten Sehnbruch
Chair: Jean-Paul Faguet

About the event:

Changes to the segmentation of labour markets in developing countries has led to strains on the social protection systems in place to regulate them. Kirsten Sehnbruch looks at why social protection systems in developing countries underperform when they are linked to highly precarious formal labour markets, using the example of the Chilean unemployment insurance savings account (UISA) system to illustrate the faults in the systems. 

2015

Wednesday 2 December, 6:30-8pm

Book Launch: Is Decentralization Good for Development?

Speakers: Professor Jean-Paul Faguet,  Dr Adnan Khan
Chair: Professor John Sidell

About the event:

Is Decentralization Good For Development combines academics of decentralization and policymakers who have implemented reform at the highest levels of administration. The insights presented here will be of interest not only to students and academics, but also to policymakers, public sector managers, and development practitioners.

 


 

Wednesday 18 November, 6:30-8pm

Africa Talk
"Enough!": Will youth protests drive political change in Africa?

Speaker: Professor Alcinda Honwana
Chair: Dr Joseph Hanlon

About the event:

Marginalized young Africans are fighting back. They organize street protests against government, risk their lives to reach Europe, and join radical groups such as Boko Haram. Young Africans are consolidating in many ways, and are making their voices heard. How will they force governments to listen?

 


 

Monday 16 November, 6:30-8pm

Theatres of Conflict. Can drama build peace?

Speakers: David Lan, Charlotte Onslow, Kushtrim Koliqi
Chair: Dr Mary Martin

About the event:

Peacebuilding and state-building initiatives traditionally bypass the arts in favour of governance and economic reforms. However there is a growing awareness that culture is an important dimension of creating stable, peaceful and democratic societies. To explore the potential of drama in conflict-affected societies, we bring together leading theatre, human rights and peacebuilding professionals. We will also show a short film by INTENT New Theatre entitled Kosovo: Life and Liberty in a Young Country.

 


 

Wednesday 11 November, 6:30-8pm

Reviving Global Democracy: beyond the 'Western Model'?

Speakers: Professor Richard Youngs, Professor Mukulika Banerjee, Professor Senem Aydin-Düzgit
Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor

About the event:

The Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit is pleased to invite you to a panel discussion and launch of Richard Youngs' new book, The Puzzle of Non-Western Democracy (Carnegie Europe). The book argues that the international community should be doing more to foster democratic variation that is tailored to the specific conditions of different countries and regions, and maps out the potential for such democratic variation.

 


 

Tuesday 10 November, 6:30-8pm (recording)

Africa Talk
Nigeria's 2015 General Election:  Giving Democracy a Chance

Speaker: Professor Attahiru Jega, INEC, Nigeria
Chair: Dr Kate Meagher

About the event:

Nigeria's 2015 general ‎elections were the most contentious and most successful in the nation’s history. The man at the helm of the electoral process tells the inside story of Nigeria’s first successful transfer of power, and draws lessons for democratic transitions in other African countries.

 


 

Monday 12 October, 6:30-8pm (recording)

Is Africa Rising? A Personal Perspective from Winnie Byanyima

Speaker: Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International
Chair: Dr Duncan Green

About the event:

Winnie will reflect on her own life and experiences growing up in Uganda, and discuss the true nature of Africa's growth story and how we must tackle crisis of inequality in Africa.

 


 

Tuesday 02 June 2015, 2-3.30pm

Careers in Social Entrepreneurship and Impact Investing

Speaker: Mario Ferro, CEO, Wedu
Chair: Dr Silvia Masiero

About the event:

Social entrepreneurship and impact investing are spaces growing exponentially and which represent viable career opportunities with personal and financial reward. In this interactive careers workshop for MSc students, Mario Ferro will share his experience starting a social enterprise and suggest how students can join the space by creating jobs.

 


 

Tuesday 13 May 2015, 6:30-8pm

Book Launch: Private Wealth and Public Revenue in Latin America

Speakers: Dr Tasha Fairfield, Dr Robert Falkner, Professor David Soskice
Chair: Professor Ken Shadlen

About the event:

The launch event of this exciting new book will see the author, Dr Tasha Fairfield, discuss issues of tax and inequality with Robert Falkner (International Relations) and David Soskice (Government).

For more information about the book and for testimonials, see the dedicated publication page >> 

 


 

Tuesday 28 April, 2015, 6:30-8pm (recording)

The Power of a Single Number: A Political History of GDP

Speaker: Dr Philipp Lepenies, IASS Potsdam
Chair: Professor Robert Wade 

About the event:

As the main indicator for progress, well-being, power and development, GDP has become the most powerful statistic in human history. Any problem that modern governments attempt to solve revert to an approach that revolves around GDP. But why is this so? How could a statistical figure unknown before World War II triumph in this way?

 


 

Thursday 19 March 2015, 6.30-8pm (recording)

Engaging Citizens MOOC: A Game Changer for Development? 

Speaker: Various (LSE, ODI, ONE, World Bank, etc.)
Chair: Abha Joshi-Ghani, World Bank

About the event:

Engaging citizens has a vital role to play in the process of development. It helps to improve transparency and accountability of public policies, to build trust with citizens, to forge consensus around important reforms, and to build the political and public support necessary to sustain them.

A number of institutions, including the London School of Economics, have demonstrated their commitment to this important agenda by developing a MOOC - a free, four-week online course on citizen engagement.

The course examines the role that citizen engagement can play in improving policymaking and public service delivery, and investigates the impact of new technologies in this process. The course is hosted by Coursera and starts on 15 March.

The Department of International Development is hosting a launch event on Thursday 19 March, in which a number of themes related to the MOOC will be discussed with a panel of experts.


 

Wednesday 11 March 2015, 6.30-8pm

Global Security Policy: A part of the problem or answer?

Speakers: Professor Ken Booth, Àlvaro de Soto, Dr Natasha Marhia, Dr Henry Radice
Chair: Professor Mary Kaldor

Hosted by: Civil Society and Human Research Security Research Unit.

About the event:

There is a growing sense of insecurity in many parts of the world, reinforced by policy responses that are ineffective and even counterproductive. Is global security policy failing and what can be done?  What ideas and instruments can help us meet the security challenges we are facing?

This panel brings together academics and practitioners with diverse expertise in the security field and marks the publication of The Handbook of Global Security Policy.

 


 

Wednesday 5 March 2015, 7-8.30pm

Development in China: A Personal View

Speaker: Dr Tang Lixia
Chair: Professor James Putzel

About the event:

Since rural economic reform in the late 1970s, China's development agenda has become a hot topic in global development discourse. Dr Tang Lixia shares a personal story of how Chinese life has changed over recent decades.

 


 

Thursday 19 February 2015, 6-8pm (report)

'Nowhere to Call Home'

Speaker: Jocelyn Ford, Director
Chair: Dr Mayling Birney

About the event:

The Department of International Development celebrated Chinese New Year by screening the riveting documentary, 'Nowhere to Call Home: A Tibetan in Beijing', followed by a Q&A session with director Jocelyn Ford.

 


 

Tuesday 27 January 2015, 6.30-8pm  (podcast)

Sovereigns, Vultures and Ignoble Cowardice

Speaker: Felix Salmon 
Chair: Professor Ken Shadlen

About the event:

Atrocious jurisprudence has plunged Argentina into an unwanted default and upended the world of sovereign debt.

 

You can download the entire list of past events from 2012 - 2014 here.

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Telephone

Dru Daley, Deputy Department Manager +44(0)20 7955 7425

Roxane Ray, MSc Programme Manager +44(0)20 7955 2626

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Email

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