Dr Natacha Postel-Vinay

Dr Natacha Postel-Vinay

Assistant Professor

Department of Economic History

Telephone
02079557084
Room No
SAR 6.13
Office Hours
MT: Thursdays 14:30-16:30 | LT: Thursdays 15:00-16:30
Languages
English
Key Expertise
Economics, Monetary History, Financial Crises

About me

I am an economic and financial historian. My research explores international finance, money and banking from a historical perspective. It looks at how private finance and monetary policy have affected the business cycle over time, creating and destroying leverage and liquidity. I am an expert in the economic and financial history of the Great Depression. My research also focuses financial crisis resolution and the macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy. I teach monetary and financial history from 1600 to the twenty-first century, and am a CEPR Research Affiliate.

Research interests

  • Financial history of the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Financial, banking and monetary crises, especially the Great Depression and the Great Recession.
  • Mortgage and household debt.
  • Public finance: the impact of fiscal policy on the business cycle. 

Teaching 

EH430  - Monetary and Financial History


 

Journal publications

Postel-Vinay, N. (2017). "Debt Dilution in 1920s America: Lighting the Fuse of a Mortgage Crisis" , Economic History Review, 70 (2), pp. 559-585

Postel-Vinay, N. (2016).  "What Caused Chicago Bank Failures in the Great Depression? A Look at the 1920s". Journal of Economic History 76 (2), pp. 478-519

Postel-Vinay, N. (2016) “Sitting Ducks: Banks, Mortgage Lending, and the Great Depression in the Chicago Area, 1923-1933.” Dissertation summary, Journal of Economic History, 76(2), pp. 595-626.

Working papers

Cloyne, J., Dimsdale, N. and N. Postel-Vinay. (2018). “Taxes and Growth: New Narrative Evidence from Interwar Britain", NBER Working Paper and CEPR Discussion Paper.

 Vox column here.

Current projects 

 “International investors and the German banking crisis of 1931” with Stéphanie Collet (Goethe University and Sustainable Financial Architecture for Europe (SAFE)).

“Making bankers pay: from blanket guarantees to market discipline in Sweden, 1920-1939” with Erik Bengtsson (University of Lund) and Anders Ogren (University of Lund).

“Was the US Great Depression a credit boom gone wrong?” invited book chapter for INET’s Private Debt Conference (June 2019), to be published by INET and Cambridge University Press.

Media

LSE IQ Podcast “Are cryptocurrencies the future of money” (June 7, 2018).

CNBC appearance on Bitcoin (December 4, 2017).

Real estate bubbles leading to bank troubles — 2008? Not exactlyLSE Business Review (July 6, 2016).

Bristol Festival of Economics “The Problem of the Banks” panel (October 28, 2014).

The experience of the U.S. Great Depression suggests parallels between 1920s mortgage lending and the recent financial crisis LSE USApp (July 18, 2014).

 

Expertise Details

International Monetary and Banking phenomena; Financial Crisis Resolution; Macroeconomic Effects of Fiscal Policy.