Our departments and programmes

The Department of Anthropology

People generally think that social anthropology is an extremely niche subject, but the converse is true. We explore various broad topics such as gender and sexuality, human nature, race and culture, and witchcraft. The Anthropology Department is a tight-knit community of dedicated teachers, enthusiastic seniors and fun-loving peers who bring the subject to life.

Berenice Low, BA Social Anthropology

Welcome to the Department of Anthropology. Here you can meet our students and staff virtually and find out more about the Department and our programmes. Take your time to browse through the information and follow the links to our Department webpages to really get to know us.

An introduction to Anthropology at LSE An introduction to Anthropology at LSE
Watch this video for an introduction to studying anthropology as an undergraduate at LSE

Visit the Department webpages

Watch our Virtual Open Day talk

Watch our Anthropology Virtual Open Day video to find out more about our degree programes, teaching and assessment methods and life in the Department. 

You can also watch our Virtual Open Day 2020 Anthropology Q&A session here. 

 

Top three reasons why you should study anthropology at LSE

  1. Learn from the best – the most recent REF rated us the best anthropology department in the UK for the quality of our research outputs.
  2. Our courses offer a truly comprehensive overview of how social life is shaped by religious, political, legal, economic, kinship and gender systems.
  3. Take optional courses with world-renowned experts in the anthropology of childhood, activism, health and welfare, migration, development and cognition.

For even more reasons why you should pick anthropology at LSE, read on here.

What is it like to study anthropology at LSE?

Anthropology is the comparative study of culture, society and human experience. The discipline examines the influence of the social and cultural worlds we live in on individual beliefs, values and practices. Students will examine the variable and universal aspects of human culture and society through the exploration of political, economic, family, and religious systems.

Listen to our taster lecture to find out more about studying anthropology at LSE.

Our programmes: BA/BSc Social Anthropology

BA/BSc Social Anthropology: Compulsory anthropology courses address political and legal systems, economic life, kinship and gender, religion and globalisation. All students will undertake an ethnographic study during the second year and complete an extended essay in the third year. Students can also select their own courses from within and outside of the Department. Students can also spend their second year summer break undertaking independent fieldwork through the Department's Summer Fieldwork Projects scheme.

Students can select whether they wish to graduate with a BA or BSc title - the programme content is the same.

Language specialism: Students who have taken and passed at least one language course in each year of their degree can opt to receive a language specialism attached to their degree certificate and transcript. The three courses must be consecutively harder in level, for example: beginner, intermediate and advanced. Students must take all courses in the same language (French, Spanish, German, Mandarin or Russian) in order to qualify for the specialism. Degree certificates which include a language specialism will state the language in the title, for example: BA in Social Anthropology with French.

For detailed information regarding entry requirements, programme content, preliminary reading and accreditation please visit our BA Social Anthropology and BSc Social Anthropology programme pages.

Key facts

  • Academic year 2021/22: September 2021 - June 2022
  • Application deadline: 15 January 2021
  • Duration: Three years full-time
  • BA applications/offers/intake 2019: 227/108/29
  • BSc applications/offers/intake 2019: 110/55/14
  • Median salary of our UG students 6 months after graduating*: £22,000
  • Top 5 sectors our students work in*: Education and teaching, NGOs and charities, media, law and legal services, public relations and communications

Entry requirements

Here we list our entry requirements in terms of A-levels and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. We also accept a wide range of other qualifications from the UK and from overseas, so if you are not studying these qualifications please follow the relevant link. For our GCSE requirements please see the BA Social Anthropology and BSc Social Anthropology programme pages.

Please also note that LSE has subject preferences and some programmes may have specific requirements in terms of subjects you are required to take. Please see the programme pages (BA Social Anthropology and BSc Social Anthropology) for this information.

UCAS code BA: L601
UCAS code BSc: L603
A-levels: AAB
IB Diploma: 37 points overall with 666 at higher level

*The data was collected through an annual Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, aggregated over five years (2011-2016). The survey was completed by graduates approximately six months after their graduation ceremony. The median salary is calculated for those whose main activity is working full-time and includes those working outside the UK.

Our programmes: BA Anthropology and Law

This is a qualifying law degree that enables students to combine their interest in the legal system with the study of what it means to be human. Students study law courses that enable them to take the LPC (Legal Practice Course) after graduation alongside compulsory and optional anthropology courses, including political and legal anthropology, development as well as a range of geographically or ethnographically specific courses. Students can also spend their second year summer conducting independent fieldwork with the support of the Department's Summer Fieldwork Projects scheme.

For detailed information regarding entry requirements, programme content, preliminary reading and accreditation please visit our BA Anthropology and Law programme page.

Key facts

  • Academic year 2021/22: September 2021 - June 2022
  • Application deadline: 15 January 2021
  • Duration: Three years full-time
  • Applications/offers/intake 2019: 229/45/17
  • Median salary of our UG students 6 months after graduating*: £22,000
  • Top 5 sectors our students work in*: Education and teaching, NGOs and charities, media, law and legal services, public relations and communications

Entry requirements

Here we list our entry requirements in terms of A-levels and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. We also accept a wide range of other qualifications from the UK and from overseas, so if you are not studying these qualifications please follow the relevant link. For our GCSE requirements please see the BA Anthropology and Law programme page.

Please also note that LSE has subject preferences and some programmes may have specific requirements in terms of subjects you are required to take. Please see the  programme page for this information.

UCAS code: ML16
A-levels: AAB
IB Diploma: 37 points overall with 666 at higher level

*The data was collected through an annual Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, aggregated over five years (2011-2016). The survey was completed by graduates approximately six months after their graduation ceremony. The median salary is calculated for those whose main activity is working full-time and includes those working outside the UK.

Study abroad opportunities

In addition to the School wide exchanges, students taking the BA/BSc Social Anthropology or BA Anthropology and Law programme can apply to participate in year long exchanges with the following institutions: the University of Melbourne, Australia; Fudan University, China; the University of Tokyo, Japan.

The study abroad year takes place after the second year of study. Students will return to LSE after their study abroad year to complete their degree, making the total study duration four years. You can find more information about study abroad opportunities on our study abroad page and hear about the experiences of previous anthropology exchange participants here.

Our research and events

As a Department we are always busy. Explore our research, as well as the events and seminars we put on below.

You can play The Long Day of Young Peng here. Take a look at our interactive digital ethnography research overview and presentation summarising this.

Explore our research

Take a look at our events

Stay in touch

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