Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey

Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey

Assistant Professor

Department of Social Policy

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Languages
English
Key Expertise
Development, Citizenship, Migration, Conflict, Governance, Race

About me

Robtel Neajai Pailey is Assistant Professor in International Social and Public Policy. She joined the LSE Department of Social Policy in September 2020 and contributes to a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses.

A scholar-activist working at the intersection of Critical Development Studies and Critical African Studies, Robtel centres her research on how structural transformation is conceived and contested by local, national and transnational actors from ‘crisis’-affected regions of the so-called Global South. Her current project, Africa’s ‘Negro’ Republics, examines how slavery, colonialism and neoliberalism in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, respectively, have shaped the adoption and maintenance of constitutional clauses barring non-blacks from obtaining citizenship in Liberia and Sierra Leone. She has conducted multi-sited fieldwork across three continents, including in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Denmark, Ghana, Liberia, Niger, Sierra Leone, Somaliland, the United Kingdom and United States.

Robtel is author of the forthcoming monograph Development, (Dual) Citizenship and Its Discontents in Africa: The Political Economy of Belonging to Liberia (Cambridge University Press, 2021). Her work has also been published in academic journals such as Development and Change, African Affairs, Democratization, Migration Studies, Citizenship Studies, and Review of African Political Economy, amongst others.

Previously a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the University of Oxford and an Ibrahim Leadership Fellow at the African Development Bank Group, Robtel completed her doctorate in Development Studies at SOAS, University of London, in 2014.

Expertise Details

Political economy of development; Citizenship construction and practice; Migration; Development cooperation; Conflict and post-war recovery; Governance; Race; Racism and racialisation processes; Qualitative methodologies