Dr Federico Picinali

Dr Federico Picinali

Associate Professor of Law

LSE Law School

Telephone
020-7955-7265
Room No
New Academic Building 4.02
Languages
English, French, Italian
Key Expertise
Theoretical questions in evidence law and in criminal law

About me

I earned a Degree in Legal Sciences and a Specialized Degree in Law at the Università degli Studi di Milano. I then studied at the Yale Law School and at the Università degli Studi di Trento, where I earned an LL.M. and a Ph.D. in law, respectively. During these formative years I was an exchange student at the UC Berkeley School of Law and a visiting researcher at the UC Hastings College of the Law, at the Cardozo School of Law, and at Penn Law. Just prior to becoming an Assistant Professor, I was a visiting fellow at LSE Law School and a LSE Fellow. I have been admitted to the Italian Bar.

I teach and research in criminal law and evidence law, with a particular interest in theoretical approaches to these subjects. I have written on the criminal standard of proof, on inferential reasoning in legal fact-finding, on statistical evidence, on improperly obtained evidence, on criminal intention and on self-defence, among other topics. I have published in several journals, including the Modern Law Review, Law & Philosophy, the Canadian Journal of Law & Jurisprudence, the Journal of Applied Philosophy, Criminal Law & Philosophy, the International Journal of Evidence & Proof, Jurisprudence, and Law, Probability & Risk. I am currently working on a book on intermediate criminal verdicts for the Oxford Monographs in Criminal Law and Justice Series (OUP).

I am the coordinator of the LSE Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Theory Forum.

I live in Sheffield with my wife – philosopher Jules Holroyd – our two daughters and our dog. I am a keen rock climber and I often visit the crags of the nearby Peak District.

Administrative support: Law.Reception@lse.ac.uk

Research interests

I am a scholar of evidence law and criminal law. My main interest is in the philosophy underlying these two areas of law. I enjoy reading in epistemology, inductive logic, moral philosophy and philosophy of mind, and studying legal problems with the support of these disciplines.

Teaching

Articles

Book Chapters

  • 'Implicit Bias, Self-Defence, and the Reasonable Person' (with Jules Holroyd), in C. Lernestedt and M. Matravers (eds.), The Criminal Law’s Person (Hart, 2022)
  • 'Excluding Evidence for Integrity’s Sake? (with Jules Holroyd), in C. Dahlman, A. Stein, G. Tuzet (eds.) The Philosophical Foundations of Evidence Law (OUP 2021)
  • ‘Lo Stato d’Ebbrezza tra Accertamento Sintomatico e Soglie di Rilevanza Penale’, in La Prova dei Fatti Psichici (Carmela Piemontese and Emma Venafro eds., Giappichelli, 2009)

Book reviews

  • review of Dale A. Nance, The Burdens of Proof: Discriminatory Power, Weight of Evidence, and Tenacity of Belief (Cambridge University Press, 2016), 330 pp., ISBN 978-1-107-12418-9’, in Jurisprudence, Vol. 9, Issue 1, p. 192 (2018)
  • review of Michele Caianiello, Ammissione della Prova e Contraddittorio nelle Giurisdizioni Penali Internazionali (Giappichelli 2008), 232 pp., in Jus-17, Vol. 2, p. 154 (2009)

Awards

  • Winner of the LSE Student-Led Teaching Excellence Award 2017 in the category ‘Feedback and Communication’
  • My paper ‘Base Rates of Negative Traits: Instructions for Use in Criminal Trials’, in Journal of Applied Philosophy, Vol. 33(1), pp. 69-88 (2016) won the prize for best essay published in the Journal of Applied Philosophy in 2016 (the prize included a monetary award, and free registration and accommodation for the next Society for Applied Philosophy annual conference)
  • Nominee for the LSE Student-Led Teaching Excellence Awards, 2015 and 2016
  • Class Teacher Prize, awarded by the LSE Law Department, 2013