Dr Kate Summers

Dr Kate Summers

British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow

Department of Methodology

Room No
COL.1.04
Office Hours
Please contact me directly to make an appointment
Languages
English
Key Expertise
Interviews, Focus groups, Participatory approaches, Thematic analysis

About me

Kate is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Methodology. Her research centres on developing qualitative methods to study social security policy in a (post) pandemic context.

Kate was an LSE Fellow in the Methodology Department from 2018-2021. She completed her PhD in the Department of Social Policy at the LSE in 2018, holds an MSc in Social Policy (Research) also from the LSE and a BA in Modern History from the University of Oxford.

Kate’s research is concerned with experiences and perceptions of poverty, economic inequality, and related social policies with a particular focus on social security policy, in the UK context. She uses (and is interested in the potential and power of) qualitative methods including in-depth interviews, focus groups and participatory approaches.

Other key research projects include Welfare at a (Social) Distance and The Commission on Social Security: Led by experts by experience.

Expertise Details

Qualitative interviews; Focus groups; Participatory approaches; Research with 'vulnerable' groups; Thematic analysis; Poverty; riches and economic inequality in the UK; Working-age social security policy; Welfare reform; Sociology of money

Publications

2021, ‘Guiding principles for social security policy: outcomes from a bottom-up approach’ (with Michael Orton and Rosa Morris), Social Policy and Administration (link)

2021, ‘The Long and Short of It: The temporal significance of wealth and income’ (with Katharina Hecht), Social Policy and Administration (link)

2020, ‘For the Greater Good? Ethical reflections on interviewing the ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ in qualitative research’, International Journal of Social Research Methodology (link)

2020, ‘Universal Simplicity? The alleged simplicity of Universal Credit from administrative and claimant perspectives’ (with David Young), The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice (link)

2019, ‘Poverty development in affluent welfare states’, in, B. Greve (ed.), Routledge International Handbook of Poverty. (link)

Reports

Hunger and the welfare state: Food insecurity among benefit claimants during COVID-19, Geiger, Edmiston, Scullion, Summers, de Vries, Ingold, Robertshaw and Young (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report.

Solidarity in a crisis? Trends in attitudes to benefits during COVID-19, de Vries, Geiger, Scullion, Summers, Edmiston, Ingold, Robertshaw and Young (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report.

Should social security reach further? Ineligibility for benefits at the start of COVID-19, Geiger, Scullion, Summers, Martin, Lawler, Edmiston, Gibbons, Ingold, Robertshaw, and de Vries (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report.

Non-take-up of benefits at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Geiger, Scullion, Summers, Martin, Lawler, Edmiston, Gibbons, Ingold, Robertshaw, and de Vries (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report.

Navigating Pandemic Social Security: Benefits, Employment and Crisis Support during COVID-19, Edmiston, Robertshaw, Gibbons, Ingold, Geiger, Scullion, Summers, and Young (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report.

Claimants' experiences of the social security system during the first wave of COVID-19, Summers, Scullion, Geiger, Robertshaw, Edmiston, Gibbons, Karagiannaki, De Vries and Ingold (2021). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Project Report. It was covered in the Guardian.

At the edge of the safety net: Unsuccessful benefits claims at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Geiger, Scullion, Summers, Martin, Lawler, Edmiston, Gibbons, Ingold, Karagiannaki, Robertshaw, and de Vries, R (2020). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Rapid Report #3. It was covered in the Guardian and the Big Issue.

Who are the new COVID-19 cohort of benefit claimants?, Edmiston, Geiger, De Vries, Scullion, Summers, Ingold, Robertshaw, Gibbons, and Karagiannaki (2020). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Rapid Report #2.

Claiming But Connected to Work. Geiger, Karagiannaki, Edmiston, Scullion, Summers, Ingold, Robertshaw, and Gibbons (2020). Welfare at a (Social) Distance Rapid Report #1.

Living on Different Incomes in London: Can public consensus identify a ‘riches line’?, Davis, Hecht, Burchardt, Gough, Hirsch, Rowlingson and Summers (2020). Trust for London.