Dr Jerome Roos

Dr Jerome Roos

LSE Fellow in International Political Economy

International Development

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Languages
Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Spanish
Key Expertise
Political economy, finance, crisis, debt, development, social movements

About me

Jerome Roos is an LSE Fellow in International Political Economy (IPE) at the Department of International Development of the London School of Economics. His research focuses on the political economy of global finance, sovereign debt and international crisis management. He holds a dual degree in International Political Economy from Sciences Po Paris and the London School of Economics, and a PhD in Political and Social Sciences from the European University Institute in Florence. Prior to returning to LSE in January 2018, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Sociology of the University of Cambridge.

Jerome’s first book, published by Princeton University Press in 2019, seeks to unravel a striking puzzle at the heart of the global debt regime: why, despite frequent crises and the immense costs of repayment, do so many heavily indebted countries continue to service their international debts? Building on a historical analysis of past sovereign default cycles and comparative case studies of contemporary debt crises in Mexico (1982-1989), Argentina (1999-2002) and Greece (2010-2015), the book demonstrates how the transformations of the global political economy over the past four decades have contributed to a general decline in the incidence of sovereign default and much more creditor-friendly outcomes in times of crisis.

In addition to a number of journal articles, Jerome is currently working on preparations for a second book project on the making and remaking of the international economic order. He also regularly provides commentary on current affairs to various international media.

Selected publications

Books:

Media articles:

Interviews:

Expertise Details

Global finance; sovereign debt; crisis management; international development; history of capitalism; contentious politics; social movements; Latin America; Southern Europe