otcrowdS

Events and podcasts

IDEAS events aim to provide the public, policymakers, and professionals with diplomatic insight.

Our events include public lectures, debates, policy workshops, and international conferences.

In IDEAS we certainly hope we have something worthwhile to offer a global public hungry for analysis rather than soundbites, open debate rather than cheap posturing.
IDEAS Director Professor Michael Cox

Upcoming public events

Hard Brexit, Soft Brexit, No Brexit? LSE IDEAS-Konrad Adenauer Stiftung Pubic Lecture

Thursday October 19th, 6.30-8pm, Old Theatre, LSE
This event puts relations between the UK, Germany, and the EU in focus, exploring the likelihood and consequences of three Brexit scenarios.

Get event invitations in your inbox by signing up for the LSE IDEAS newsletter: e-mail ideas.events@lse.ac.uk

Private events

LSE IDEAS private events provide a space for policymakers and professionals to access and debate the latest evidence and insight. We aim to create constructive conversations.

They include policy seminars, breakfast meetings, conferences, and dinners.

Recent private events

Corporate Peace: private sector strategies for conflict prevention, peacebuilding and sustainable development LSE IDEAS United Nations at LSE - WOSCAP Event

This roundtable examined research findings from the EU- funded ‘Whole of Society Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding' and other studies on public-private partnerships to explore the possibilities for both policymakers and companies to work more constructively together for the benefit of both. 

Alumni Policy Weekend on the Rise of Populism

Last weekend IDEAS hosted the first Alumni Policy Weekend event for graduates of Executive MSc International Strategy and Diplomacy, entitled The Rise of Populism and the Crisis of Globalization: Brexit, Trump and Beyond. Speakers included: IDEAS Director Michael Cox, Tim Oliver, Uta Staiger, Brian Klaas, Barry Buzan, Leslie Vinjamuri, Mukulika Banerjee, Yu Jie, and Sir Robert Cooper.

Terror in France: The Rise of Jihad in the West

Do recent ISIS inspired terror attacks in France represent an outbreak of violence that has long been building? At this event, author and terrorism expert Gilles Kepel discussed the origins of the virulent new wave of jihadism that has Europe as its main target.

Alumni Breakfast - Organised Crime: An Industry that Carries a $4 Trillion Cost

New analysis by the Global Initiative against Transnational Organised Crime suggests that across a selection of six private sector industries the scale and cost of organised crime is between $3.6-$4.8 trillion. Senior representatives from the Initiative presented the findings to our  Executive MSc International Strategy and Diplomacy alumni.

The New Silk Routes: How is infrastructure reconnecting Asia? LSE IDEAS-LSE Department for International Relations event 

China’s recent revival of the historic ‘Silk Road’ has captured the imaginations of both policymakers and business leaders. At this event, representatives from the Reconnecting Asia project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington DC explained their ambitious initiative to map infrastructure projects across Eurasia.

From Iraq to the New Cold War: Hans Blix 

Hans Blix achieved international prominence in his role as Head of the UN team which failed to discover WMD in Iraq in 2003. At this event, Blix explored lessons from the past and a way forward for the future of weapons control in a world that has become no safer.          

Global Elite Knowledge Networks & Anglo-American Power: Think Tanks, Foundations, & Universities & the New World Order LSE IDEAS-City University London-Princeton University event.

This international workshop examined the role of think tanks in foreign policy making. In particular, it focused on the huge influence of think tanks in post war planning during and after World War II, and the establishment of international informal networks of policy evidence.

China, Brexit, & the EU: Challenges, Uncertainties, & Opportunities?

This China Foresight-Dahrendorf Forum workshop explored strategic aspects of China-EU relations and how the Brexit debate will impact the newly revived bilateral relationship between Beijing and London. Included speakers from the Italian Foreign Ministry and the French Embassy.

British-Soviet Relations Archive Project Launch

The launch of our British-Soviet Relations Archive Project took place at the British Academy. Speakers included Ash Amin, Foreign Secretary of the British Academy, Alexandr Chubarian of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Vladimir Pechatnov of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations.

Policy Workshop: Shifting Drug Strategies in Ireland and the UK

The International Drug Policy Project hosted a high-level policy planning workshop for civil servants and experts from around the world, with a keynote speech by current Irish Minister with responsibility for the National Drugs Strategy, Adhán O’Ríordáin.

Policy Breakfast: Russia's Intervention in Syria 

Diplomats, civil servants, and journalists joined academics at IDEAS to discuss Russian military action in Syria at this private policy breakfast event with the Dahrendorf Forum and LSE Department of International Relations.

All podcasts by date

Trump and China in the Asian Century 
Part of the 'Rethinking the Cold War' Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield. 

The election of Donald Trump as president signals a profound change in US foreign relations. In this lecture, Professor Arne Westad of Harvard University asks what the reactions to the Trump presidency are likely to be in eastern Asia and whether we are facing a fundamental power shift in the region.

Pathways to Peace in Colombia LSE IDEAS - International Alert - LSE LACC Event

Joshua Mitrotti, director of Colombia’s Agency for Reintegration on the challenges and achievements of a ground-breaking approach to absorb thousands of former paramilitaries and guerrilla fighters into productive employment as part of the country’s post-conflict transition.

The Balkans in the Cold War: Book Launch Discussion

The edited volume ‘Balkans in the Cold War’ contains 16 contributions from renowned experts and scholars on how the global Cold War manifested in the Balkans. This Q&A with the editors includes introductory comments by Arne Westad and Vesselin Dimitrov.

The Life and Times of Clement Attlee: From Houghton Street to Downing Street 

Clement Attlee was one of the great sons of the LSE, yet he was looked down upon by many academics on the left. What does Attlee’s life say about the story of the left in modern Britain and indeed the part played by the LSE in that history? Attlee biographer John Bew discusses with IDEAS Director and LSE historian Michael Cox. 

The World Reimagined: Americans and Human Rights
Part of the 'Rethinking the Cold War' Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield.

How did the idea of 'human rights' develop in the twentieth century? In this lecture, Mark Bradley explored how changes in US culture and thought in the 1970s reflected a changing global idea of 'universial human rights' and changed the American idea of what it means to be free.

Revolutions in the Afghan Desert Part of the LSE Literary Festival 2017 

The story of how vast areas of desert in Afghanistan have been transformed into farming land through the use of revolutionary new technologies in the poppy and opium trade. This event was part of the IDEAS exhibition on the topic, and included insight from satellite imagery.               

From One Cold War to Another? Part of the LSE Literary Festival 2017

A wide ranging conversation with authors and columnists Anne Applebaum, Gideon Rachman, and Jonathan Fenby on if Russia and the West are facing a 'New Cold War', the rise of China, and the future of the international order. 

Drug Policies Beyond the 'War on Drugs'? Part of the LSE Works lecture series

As countries examine new ways of managing drugs beyond the failed 'war on drugs' model, this event explored the future of drug policy and the role of LSE research in driving government policies around the world.

Looking Back: Looking Forward. Another 'Twenty Years' Crisis?

The international system is facing a perfect storm. Can history teach us how to avoid crisis? Ken Booth, Mary Kaldor, and Michael Cox discuss E.H. Carr's Twenty Years Crisis.

Margaret Gowing and British Nuclear History LSE IDEAS - NATO - LSE Department of International History conference. 

Margaret Gowing was an LSE alumna & leading nuclear historian, who wrote the ground breaking official history of Britain & Atomic Energy. Members of the Gowing family, NATO officials, civil servants, leading historians, & LSE students attended this one day conference to explore her personal and academic legacy.

Clash of the Titans? China-US Relations from Nixon to Trump

When Nixon opened a door to China in 1972  the world was turned upside down for ever. But what is the state of the US-China relationship nearly fifty years on? Margaret Macmillan and Christopher Coker discuss the past, present, and future of arguably the most significant relationship of the modern era. 

War and PCs: Cyber and Violence in the 21st Century

Lecture by General Sir Richard Barrons, who served as Commander Joint Forces Command until April 2016 in a military career including operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, Iraq and Afghanistan. In this lecture, Sir Richard outlines how disruptive technology will transform defence and security thinking worldwide.

A Briton at the Heart of Europe: Revisiting Roy Jenkins' Presidency of the European Commission LSE IDEAS - LSE Department of International History event. 

Forty years ago, a British politician was appointed President of the European Commission. In this lecture Dr Piers Ludlow explored what Jenkins' tenure reveals about the nature of the job and the history of Britain in Europe. 

The Legacy of Peace: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos

LSE IDEAS was honoured to welcome President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Juan Manuel Santos to the LSE. The President gave insight into the peace process, spoke about Colombia's environmental policies inspired by the Stern Report, and revealed his favourite memory of being an LSE student.                

The European Union at the Crossroads: Brexit and After

With the UK heading for Brexit, the European Union faces a historic challenge but also an opportunity to rethink its own future. French Minister Axelle Lemaire, historian Margaret MacMillan, and Lord Giddens debated Brexit and the future of Europe.

An Imaginary War? Culture, Thought and Nuclear Conflict during the Cold War Part of the Rethinking the Cold War Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield. 

Collective imaginations of nuclear warfare were a central battleground of the Cold War, fought through war-games and fictitious scenarios. This panel debate explored the 'imaginary war' and how culture and individuals struggled to comprehend nuclear war.

Strengthening Global Governance for the 21st Century

In this lecture, Director-General of UNESCO Irina Bokova explored the role of the United Nations in sustaining a rules-based international order in an increasingly turbulent world.         

The Decline of the West in the New Asian Century?

Financial Times columnist Gideon Rachman and experts from LSE IDEAS discussed his new book Easternisation, debating how far Asia's growing wealth will move the international balance of power away from the West, Chinese nationalism, and the US-China competition for allies in Asia.

Signals and Social Consequences from Shrinkflation to Fighter Jets LSE IDEAS - LSE Department of International Relations event. 

Former US Presidential adviser Pippa Malmgrem's impassioned lecture on why we need to watch non-data economic signals to understand modern geopolitics.

Power and Pragmatism with Sir Malcolm Rifkind

For almost forty years, Malcolm Rifkind served at the forefront of British politics. In this lecture, Sir Malcolm gave a lively account of his involvement in some of recent history’s most important events - such as early meetings between Thatcher and Gorbachev, and secret negotiations with the Argentine government on the Falklands Islands.

EU Referendum: What Now?

The Monday after the UK voted for Brexit, LSE IDEAS held an event with Sarasin & Partners on what happens now. LSE experts and guests from business and politics discussed the impact on the global markets, the UK economy, British politics, and the wider world. 

Military Strategy vs Business Strategy

In this Global Strategies lecture, economist John Kay discusses what business strategy can learn from military or political strategies. John Kay is one of Britain's leading economists, whose career has spanned the academic world, business and public affairs.

Decline of the West and Crisis of Democracy?

Populism is on the rise across the West. How far does this reflect a decline in Western economic power? And how much does it threaten liberal democratic institutions? Brian Klass, Gideon Rachman, and Leslie Vinjamuri debate. Select Alumni Breakfast Podcasts from the Alumni Network page to listen.

Dahrendorf Symposium: Europe and the World - Global Insecurity & Power Shifts

The Dahrendorf Symposium is a high-profile event debating Europe’s future, attended by around 300 European policymakers and foreign policy experts. View full videos, Symposium publications, and a cartoon summary from the 2016 event in Berlin.

The key to success of the Sustainable Development Goals?

This event with UN advocates Paul Polman (CEO of Unilever) and Alaa Murabit explored how the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can be achieved -including the crucial roles of local leadership and institutions, global businesses, and young people around the world.

Changing Waters: Towards a New EU Asia Strategy

The EU-Asia relationship has changed. At this event, contributors to the LSE IDEAS report Changing Waters spoke about the future of EU-Asia relations from building a new development relationship, expanding the EU's role in Asian security, and Chinese perspectives on the EU.  

Europe & the Return of Geopolitics

In this Dahrendorf Forum lecture, Ambassador Pierre Vimont, first executive secretary-general of the European External Action Service, asked whether the EU - designed to prevent geopolitics - can meet the challenge of their return in the Ukraine crisis.              

UK-China: Stocks, Shakespeare, and Satellites

British Ambassador to China Barbara Woodward on the 'Golden Era' of UK-China relations, the importance of public diplomacy, and building a strategic partnership.

After the Drug Wars report launch

In this event, contributors to After the Drug Wars from the LSE Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy set out a new framework for drug control based on the Sustainable Development Goals.            

NATO at the Crossroads

Confronting Putin? Surviving Trump? Where is NATO – and indeed the whole Transatlantic relationship – likely to be heading in these deeply uncertain times? NATO's Jamie Shea and Anne Applebaum discuss. Select Alumni Breakfast Podcasts from the Alumni Network page to listen.

Each Age Gets the Bloodshed It Needs: 20,000 Years of Violence

20,000 years ago, the average person stood a 10-20% chance of dying violently. Today, the chance is under 1%. How has this happened? Ian Morris argues that violence has slowly been putting itself out of business, with war creating large organisations that impose peace. Select Ian Morris on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Russia and the EU: back to realism?

At this Dahrendorf Forum lecture, leading Moscow analyst and Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs Fyodor Lukyanov argued that it's time to redefine the Europe - Russia relationship based on a pragmatic understanding of respective interests and capabilities.

Brexit - Britain at the Crossroads: European Consequences, Geopolitical Risks?

The FT's Gideon Rachman and New York Times Steven Erlanger assessed the international consequences of the referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership in the European Union. Select Alumni Breakfast Podcasts from the Alumni Network page to listen.

Each Age Gets the Great Powers It Needs: 20,000 Years of International Relations

Ian Morris traces the 20,000 year story of ‘International Relations’ asking why the world’s greatest powers were located where they were and where power will go next. Select Ian Morris on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Russian Foreign Policy as an Exercise in Nation-Building LSE IDEAS - LSE Department of International Relations event

Leading Moscow-based analyst Dimitri Trenin opens up the black-box of Russia’s foreign policy and sheds light in particular on the role of the internal factors driving the country's policy.

Will the 21st Century be Asian?

If the 19th Century was Europe's & the 20th America's, will the 21st belong to Asia? Public debate with Michael Cox, Danny Quah, and Leslie Vinjamuri.

The Crisis in European Security

Experienced European diplomats Robert Cooper and Wolfgang Ischinger were joined by Professors Karen Smith and Robert Falkner for this Dahrendorf Forum discussion on the Ukraine crisis and how to restore a “Europe whole and free”.

Does Europe Have a Future? LSE IDEAS - LSE US Centre event

Professor Walt of the Kennedy School at Harvard spoke at this on the strategic challenges facing the EU and if it can meet them.

Black Earth: the Holocaust as History and Warning

Timothy Snyder spoke at this event chaired by fellow Philippe Roman Chair Anne Applebaum. He explained the role that the destruction of states played in the Holocaust and argued that we must try to understand the causes of violence to learn the lessons of history.

China, the United States and Asia in the Twenty-first Century

The rivalry between China and the United States for influence in Asia will determine the geopolitical landscape in this century. Arne Westad on what China can do to mobilise its undeniable resources in the exercise of a more effective foreign policy and how domestic developments in the two countries influence their long-term Asia policies.

Deng Xiaoping vs Gorbachev

Was Deng Xiaoping right to call Mikhail Gorbachev “very stupid”? Alexander V. Pantsov discusses why the USSR couldn’t follow the pattern of Chinese reforms in the decade leading up to the collapse of the Soviet Union. 

After Snowden

What are the implications of surveillance, big data, malware and hacking for individuals and societies? What conversations do we need to have about the rules of cyberspace?

Stalin's Team

We know a lot about Stalin but less about the team – Molotov, Kaganovich, Mikoyan and the rest of a group whose membership was roughly but never quite equivalent to the Politburo – that surrounded him for 25 years.

25 Years After the End of the Cold War: Its Legacy in a New World Order

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War, how do these events shape the world today? What are the legacies of the Cold War? And are we truly in the midst of a new Cold War?

A Changing World and China

Despite China’s growing interactions with the rest of the world, the country’s foreign policy is largely dictated by domestic politics and further economic reform. Distinguished Chinese diplomat Wu Jian Min will explore China’s international strategy and what this means for the country’s relations with the rest of the world.

The Radical Transparency of the American Republic

For most of its history, the U.S. government’s commitment to transparency stood as a radical counter-example to the rest of the world. Matthew Connelly explores how recent invocations of national security stand in sharp contrast with America’s founders and their principles. Select Matthew Connelly on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

The Paradox of China's Peaceful Rise

Despite the widespread view that China does not have a coherent grand strategy, China has already articulated one that is based on the home-grown idea of ‘peaceful rise/development’. Barry Buzan, Arne Westad, and Michael Cox discuss.

A New Strategy? Russia as an Unlikely Soft Power

This expert roundtable discusses Russia’s declared strategy to invest in soft power instruments in regional and global politics. What are Russia’s soft power assets? Has Moscow been successful in turning them into influence?

The Polish Roundtable Talks and the End of the Cold War

The Polish roundtable talks and subsequent elections on 4 June 1989 were a crucial step in ending the Cold War. 25 years later, LSE IDEAS and the Polish Embassy in London hosted witnesses of the Polish Democratic Transition to join academics to discuss the importance of the events for Poland, for Europe, and for the world.

Ending the Drug Wars report launch

Members of the Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy present the evidence from their report Ending the Drug Wars.

What's so Great About Strong Leaders?

The conventional wisdom, shared by many politicians and political commentators, is that strong leaders who dominate their colleagues and the policy-making process are the most successful and admirable. Archie Brown argues this is a dangerous illusion.

Will China Dominate the 21st Century?

Jonathan Fenby speaks about the themes of his book Will China Dominate the 21st Century?

Russia, Ukraine, and Us

LSE IDEAS hosted this BBC Radio 4 debate putting the Ukraine crisis into historical context and asking what it means for our relationship with Russia. Hosted by Bridget Kendall, with Anne Applebaum, Sir Rodric Braithwaite, Ben Judah, and Olexiy Solohubenko.

After the Fall: World Order or Disorder after 1989

The end of the Cold War in 1989 ushered in a more stable world shaped by an irresistible combination of capitalism and liberalism. But did it?

An American Century or an Asian Century?

Will the future belong to the new rising powers of Asia revolving around China or the West still led by the United States?

Podcasts: Editor's highlights

From One Cold War to Another? Part of the LSE Literary Festival 2017

A wide ranging conversation with authors and columnists Anne Applebaum, Gideon Rachman, and Jonathan Fenby on if Russia and the West are facing a 'New Cold War', the rise of China, and the future of the international order.

The Legacy of Peace: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos

LSE IDEAS was honoured to welcome President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Juan Manuel Santos to the LSE. The President gave insight into the peace process, spoke about Colombia's environmental policies inspired by the Stern Report, and revealed his favourite memory of being an LSE student.

War and PCs: Cyber and Violence in the 21st Century

Lecture by General Sir Richard Barrons, who served as Commander Joint Forces Command until April 2016 in a military career including operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, Iraq and Afghanistan. In this lecture, Sir Richard outlines how disruptive technology will transform defence and security thinking worldwide.

EU Referendum: What Now?

The Monday after the UK voted for Brexit, LSE IDEAS held an event with Sarasin & Partners on what happens now. LSE experts and guests from business and politics discussed the impact on the global markets, the UK economy, British politics, and the wider world.

UK-China: Stocks, Shakespeare, and Satellites

British Ambassador to China Barbara Woodward on the 'Golden Era' of UK-China relations, the importance of public diplomacy, and building a strategic partnership.

Dahrendorf Symposium: Europe and the World - Global Insecurity & Power Shifts

The Dahrendorf Symposium is a high-profile event debating Europe’s future, attended by around 300 European policymakers and foreign policy experts. View full videos, Symposium publications, and a cartoon summary from the 2016 event in Berlin.            

Black Earth: the Holocaust as History and Warning

Timothy Snyder spoke at this event chaired by fellow Philippe Roman Chair Anne Applebaum. He explained the role that the destruction of states played in the Holocaust and argued that we must try to understand the causes of violence to learn the lessons of history.

Podcast topics: China

Trump and China in the Asian Century
Part of the 'Rethinking the Cold War' Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield. 

The election of Donald Trump as president signals a profound change in US foreign relations. In this lecture, Professor Arne Westad of Harvard University asks what the reactions to the Trump presidency are likely to be in eastern Asia and whether we are facing a fundamental power shift in the region.

Clash of the Titans? China-US Relations from Nixon to Trump

When Nixon opened a door to China in 1972  the world was turned upside down for ever. But what is the state of the US-China relationship nearly fifty years on? Margaret Macmillan and Christopher Coker discuss the past, present, and future of arguably the most significant relationship of the modern era.

The Decline of the West in the New Asian Century?

Financial Times columnist Gideon Rachman and experts from LSE IDEAS discussed his new book Easternisation, debating how far Asia's growing wealth will move the international balance of power away from the West, Chinese nationalism, and the US-China competition for allies in Asia.

UK-China: Stocks, Shakespeare, and Satellites

British Ambassador to China Barbara Woodward on the 'Golden Era' of UK-China relations, the importance of public diplomacy, and building a strategic partnership.

Deng Xiaoping vs Gorbachev

Was Deng Xiaoping right to call Mikhail Gorbachev “very stupid”? Alexander V. Pantsov discusses why the USSR couldn’t follow the pattern of Chinese reforms in the decade leading up to the collapse of the Soviet Union.

China, the United States and Asia in the 21st Century

The rivalry between China and the United States for influence in Asia will determine the geopolitical landscape in this century. Arne Westad on what China can do to mobilise its undeniable resources in the exercise of a more effective foreign policy and how domestic developments in the two countries influence their long-term Asia policies.

A Changing World and China

Despite China’s growing interactions with the rest of the world, the country’s foreign policy is largely dictated by domestic politics and further economic reform. Distinguished Chinese diplomat Wu Jian Min will explore China’s international strategy and what this means for the country’s relations with the rest of the world.

The Paradox of China's Peaceful Rise

Despite the widespread view that China does not have a coherent grand strategy, China has already articulated one that is based on the home-grown idea of ‘peaceful rise/development’. Barry Buzan, Arne Westad, and Michael Cox discuss.

The China Challenge as Myth and Reality

Few countries have experienced changes as dramatic as China in the past 25 years, from ‘revolutionary state’ to ‘status quo power’. Professor Chen Jian discusses the origins, processes and implications of China's rise from the perspective of a historian of China's international relations, focusing on deconstructing some common myths. Select Chen Jian on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

The Great Transformation: how China changed in the ‘long 1970s’

China's adoption of a new path toward modernity, one that champions ‘reform and opening to the outside world’, had profound significance not only for China itself but also for the rest of the world. What were the origins of this ‘Great Transformation’? Professor Chen Jian offers a historian's overview of China's 1970s transformation and the beginning of global systemic change that this transformation helped create. Select Chen Jian on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

China After the Olympics

Whether we think sport and politics should or should not be mixed, it is clear that in the case of the Beijing Olympics the two have never been more closely intertwined. Chian Jian is joined by Guardian Columnist Martin Jacques and Director of the Asia Research Centre Athar Hussain to discuss how the impact of the Olympics on China and ask if it changed China’s world image or affected future Western relations. Select Chen Jian on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Rising Asia in the World Crisis

The global financial crisis presents both opportunities and challenges to Asia. The initiatives and responses by Asian countries, China and India in particular, have the potential to define the world's path of development now and in the future. To discuss these issues Chen Jian is joined by Danny Quah and Athar Hussain. Select Chen Jian on the Philippe Roman Chair page page to listen.

Podcast topics: Russia

Russia and the EU: back to realism?

At this Dahrendorf Forum lecture, leading Moscow analyst and Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs Fyodor Lukyanov argued that it's time to redefine the Europe - Russia relationship based on a pragmatic understanding of respective interests and capabilities.

Russian Foreign Policy as an Exercise in Nation-Building 
LSE IDEAS-LSE Department of International Relations event

Leading Moscow-based analyst Dimitri Trenin opens up the black-box of Russia’s foreign policy and sheds light in particular on the role of the internal factors driving the country's policy.

Deng Xiaoping vs Gorbachev

Was Deng Xiaoping right to call Mikhail Gorbachev “very stupid”? Alexander V. Pantsov discusses why the USSR couldn’t follow the pattern of Chinese reforms in the decade leading up to the collapse of the Soviet Union.

A New Strategy? Russia as an Unlikely Soft Power

This expert roundtable discusses Russia’s declared strategy to invest in soft power instruments in regional and global politics. What are Russia’s soft power assets? Has Moscow been successful in turning them into influence?

Russia, Ukraine, and Us

LSE IDEAS hosted this BBC Radio 4 debate putting the Ukraine crisis into historical context and asking what it means for our relationship with Russia. Hosted by Bridget Kendall, with Anne Applebaum, Sir Rodric Braithwaite, Ben Judah, and Olexiy Solohubenko.

Putinism - The Ideology

Anne Applebaum argues that Vladimir Putin cannot be dismissed as a thuggish or thoughtless authoritarian leader. She explains the sophisticated institutional and ideological underpinnings of ‘Putinism’ as an ideology including foreign policy, history, and education. Select Anne Applebaum on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Podcast topics: Drug Policy

Revolutions in the Afghan Desert Part of the LSE Literary Festival 2017 

The story of how vast areas of desert in Afghanistan have been transformed into farming land through the use of revolutionary new technologies in the poppy and opium trade. This event was part of the IDEAS exhibition on the topic, and included insight from satellite imagery.

Drug Policies Beyond the 'War on Drugs'? Part of the LSE Works lecture series

As countries examine new ways of managing drugs beyond the failed 'war on drugs' model, this event explored the future of drug policy and the role of LSE research in driving government policies around the world.               

After the Drug Wars report launch

In this event, contributors to After the Drug Wars from the LSE Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy set out a new framework for drug control based on the Sustainable Development Goals.

Ending the Drug Wars report launch

Members of the Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy present the evidence from their report Ending the Drug Wars.

Podcast topics: The Cold War

The Balkans in the Cold War: Book Launch Discussion

The edited volume ‘Balkans in the Cold War’ contains 16 contributions from renowned experts and scholars on how the global Cold War manifested in the Balkans. This Q&A with the editors includes introductory comments by Arne Westad and Vesselin Dimitrov.

The World Reimagined: Americans and Human Rights Part of the Rethinking the Cold War Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield.

How did the idea of 'human rights' develop in the twentieth century? In this lecture, Mark Bradley explored how changes in US culture and thought in the 1970s reflected a changing global idea of 'universial human rights' and changed the American idea of what it means to be free.

An Imaginary War? Culture, Thought and Nuclear Conflict during the Cold War Part of the Rethinking the Cold War Lecture Series with the University of Sheffield. 

Collective imaginations of nuclear warfare were a central battleground of the Cold War, fought through war-games and fictitious scenarios. This panel debate explored the 'imaginary war' and how culture and individuals struggled to comprehend nuclear war.

Stalin's Team

We know a lot about Stalin but less about the team – Molotov, Kaganovich, Mikoyan and the rest of a group whose membership was roughly but never quite equivalent to the Politburo – that surrounded him for 25 years.

25 Years After the End of the Cold War: Its Legacy in a New World Order

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War, how do these events shape the world today? What are the legacies of the Cold War? And are we truly in the midst of a new Cold War?

The Polish Roundtable Talks and the End of the Cold War

The Polish roundtable talks and subsequent elections on 4 June 1989 were a crucial step in ending the Cold War. 25 years later, LSE IDEAS and the Polish Embassy in London hosted witnesses of the Polish Democratic Transition to join academics to discuss the importance of the events for Poland, for Europe, and for the world.

The Cold War and the Culture of Secrecy

Official secrecy in the U.S. during the Cold War altered the culture of government and served many hidden agendas. Matthew Connelly explains how classified information became an institutional asset, security clearances became a way to police behaviour, and senior officials leaked classified information to gain higher office. Select Matthew Connelly on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

The Political Economy of the Cold War

At its heart the Cold War was a competition between two economic systems. Niall Ferguson compares and contrasts the United States and the Soviet Union and asks how far the outcome of the Cold War was economically determined from the outset. Select Niall Ferguson on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

The Third World’s War

The Cold War was waged partly through a series of proxy wars in Third World countries from Guatemala to Korea to Vietnam. Niall Ferguson argues that we need to see the ‘Third World's War’ in perspective. He explains how successful the Soviet Union was in pursuing a strategy of fomenting revolution and how consistently successive U.S. administrations behaved in response. Select Niall Ferguson on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Nuclear Arms & Human Rights

The decisive breakthroughs in the Cold War occurred in seemingly unrelated fields, nuclear arms control and human rights. Niall Ferguson asks what were the links between these two issues and which mattered more? Select Niall Ferguson on the Philippe Roman Chair page to listen.

Event videos

Drug Policies Beyond the 'War on Drugs'? Part of the LSE Works lecture series

As countries examine new ways of managing drugs beyond the failed 'war on drugs' model, this event explored the future of drug policy and the role of LSE research in driving government policies around the world.

War and PCs: Cyber and Violence in the 21st Century

Lecture by General Sir Richard Barrons, who served as Commander Joint Forces Command until April 2016 in a military career including operations in Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, Iraq and Afghanistan. In this lecture, Sir Richard outlines how disruptive technology will transform defence and security thinking worldwide.

EU Referendum: What Now?

The Monday after the UK voted for Brexit, LSE IDEAS held an event with Sarasin & Partners on what happens now. LSE experts and guests from business and politics discussed the impact on the global markets, the UK economy, British politics, and the wider world.  

Military Strategy vs Business Strategy

In this Global Strategies lecture, economist John Kay discusses what business strategy can learn from military or political strategies. John Kay is one of Britain's leading economists, whose career has spanned the academic world, business and public affairs.

After the Drug Wars report launch

In this event, contributors to After the Drug Wars from the LSE Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy set out a new framework for drug control based on the Sustainable Development Goals.

Dahrendorf Symposium: Europe and the World - Global Insecurity & Power Shifts

The Dahrendorf Symposium is a high-profile event debating Europe’s future, attended by around 300 European policymakers and foreign policy experts. View full videos, Symposium publications, and a cartoon summary from the 2016 event in Berlin.

Ending the Drug Wars report launch

Members of the Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy present the evidence from their report Ending the Drug Wars.

The Political Economy of the Cold War

At its heart the Cold War was a competition between two economic systems. Niall Ferguson compares and contrasts the United States and the Soviet Union and asks how far the outcome of the Cold War was economically determined from the outset.

The Third World’s War

The Cold War was waged partly through a series of proxy wars in Third World countries from Guatemala to Korea to Vietnam. Niall Ferguson argues that we need to see the ‘Third World's War’ in perspective.

Nuclear Arms & Human Rights

The decisive breakthroughs in the Cold War occurred in seemingly unrelated fields, nuclear arms control and human rights. Niall Ferguson asks what were the links between these two issues and which mattered more?

Jihad: the trail of Political Islam

Political Islam has emerged as one of the great ideologies of the modern world. How did this occur? Gilles Kepel explores the origins of Islamism and its future, discussing if it makes a clash of civilization inevitable.  

Podcast speakers: Gideon Rachman

Gideon Rachman is the chief foreign affairs commentator for the Financial Times and an IDEAS Senior Visiting Fellow.

The Decline of the West in the New Asian Century?

Financial Times columnist Gideon Rachman and experts from LSE IDEAS discussed his new book Easternisation, debating how far Asia's growing wealth will move the international balance of power away from the West, Chinese nationalism, and the US-China competition for allies in Asia.

From One Cold War to Another? Part of the LSE Literary Festival 2017

A wide ranging conversation with authors and columnists Anne Applebaum, Gideon Rachman, and Jonathan Fenby on if Russia and the West are facing a 'New Cold War', the rise of China, and the future of the international order. 

Decline of the West and Crisis of Democracy?

Populism is on the rise across the West. How far does this reflect a decline in Western economic power? And how much does it threaten liberal democratic institutions? Brian Klass, Gideon Rachman, and Leslie Vinjamuri debate. Select Alumni Breakfast Podcasts from the Alumni Network page to listen.

Brexit - Britain at the Crossroads: European Consequences, Geopolitical Risks?

The FT's Gideon Rachman and New York Times Steven Erlanger assessed the international consequences of the referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership in the European Union. Select Alumni Breakfast Podcasts from the Alumni Network page to listen.

 

Twitter

LSE IDEAS lseideas

RT @LSEnews: Who really benefits from #Trump's uncertain #trade agenda? More from Andrew Hammond of @lseideas reut.rs/2xlPDLU

9 hours ago

Reply Retweet Favorite

LSE IDEAS lseideas

Connecting academics with Whitehall & beyond to enhance strategic decision making - our Global Strategies project: bit.ly/2vLgKCl

11 hours ago

Reply Retweet Favorite

Contact us

Address View on Google maps

LSE IDEAS, 9th floor, Towers 1 & 3, Clement's Inn, London, WC2A 2AZ