People

Meet our future historians!

2018-19

Students in the Department of International History

 

Keep checking this page for new profiles every few weeks.

Dominic Ambulo, BA History 

Ambulo

Dominic Ambulo
BA History, Year 1

What made you choose this course?
I’ve always enjoyed listening to my relatives talking about historical events they have witnessed or lived through. My course focuses on the modern era, so it was perfect for me as I would be studying some of the events that sparked my initial interest in history.

What made you choose LSE?
I wanted to meet people from all over the world during my studies. I felt like LSE would be perfect for that because of its location and reputation. I’m staying in halls right now but I’m from London anyways so it’s also very easy to go visit my family every now and then. 

What are the benefits of studying in London?
There is always something going on, so you will never feel like you have run out of things to do. London is also well connected with the rest of the UK and Europe so it’s convenient for people who like travelling. In terms of studies, there is a vast amount of academic resources available around.

What do you hope to gain from your degree?
I hope to gain the knowledge and skills that will help improve my understanding not just of past societies, but also of present and future ones.

What are your future prospects (after your degree)?
Further study/ post-grad (maybe).

Favourite place to study
Library 3rd floor silent study area.

If you could bring one famous historical person back to life, who would it be and why?
Socrates. Despite being an important figure in Western philosophy, he made no writings, so his ideas are known mainly through the works of his students. It would be very interesting to hear his own actual thoughts and compare it with what’s been written about him.

What is the most memorable place you have ever visited and why?
My grandmother’s hometown in the Philippines, Iloilo. It was memorable not only because it was the first time I travelled by plane, but also because my grandmother’s relatives had many stories about historical events in the Philippines that they’ve lived through.

Any tips for news students joining LSE?
Planning and being organised is important given the amount of academic and social opportunities available, especially in the first few weeks. I found that having a planner and actually using it (something that I often forgot to do) can be very helpful.

Jonathan Hodgson, BSc International Relations and History

Hodgson

Jonathan Hodgson
BSc International Relations and History, Year 2

What made you choose this programme?
I chose this course because it gave me the ability to study the past while also focusing on the present and on the future too. Studying history gives you the ability to apply lessons evident in the past to both the present and the future.  And in a time of such political upheaval, the lessons we can take from studying history seem incredibly prescient and relevant. The course would also give me the ability to challenge myself through the study of topics which I previously had never studied.

What made you choose LSE?
The LSE appeared to provide students with modern teaching and support while also providing world leading facilities where you could study and engage with world leading academics. I visited the School’s undergraduate open day and it simply felt like a great fit.

What are the benefits of studying in London?
London is such a hub of activity. Being a student of history, it is so interesting to see some of the places discussed in textbooks and academic pieces. Having the Houses of Parliament only a short walk from Campus is great as it allows you to engage more with the discussions which are at the forefront of today’s politics which in turn allows for greater understanding of how the past shapes our current world. London also has so many fantastic places to study, from grandiose libraries to quaint cafés, there’s always somewhere new to check out!

What do you hope to gain from your degree?
I hope to gain an even greater appreciation for how large a role history plays in today’s world, from the way it shapes social constructs, national identity and political decisions to how it impacts on major world decisions. I hope also to gain the skills needed to achieve well in my future career, both professional and personal.

What are your future prospects (after your degree)?
I hope to pursue a career in politics eventually as it is important to me that the issues I feel strongly about are represented and there is no greater privilege than knowing that you are serving your fellow citizens to the best of your ability. I have also considered a career in law which would allow me to pursue politics at a later date.

Favourite place to study
Regent’s Park when off-campus but 32 Lincoln’s Inn Fields when on-campus.

If you could bring one famous historical person back to life, who would it be and why?
Instinctively, I’d choose a recent historical figure such as Margaret Thatcher or Sir Winston Churchill because it would give us the chance to ask them about decisions they took during their time in power which impact the world we see today. They were also both towering figures in British and world politics and, although not always the most popular, had huge success in their lives. It would be great to see what they made of how history presents them today too.

What is the most memorable place you have ever visited and why?
Auschwitz-Birkenau. The huge historical significance which it carries as well as the emotions which came during my visit with the Holocaust Educational Trust make it easily the most memorable place I have ever visited.

Any tips for news students joining LSE?
Make the most of your time in London! It’s such an amazing city full of culture and history that you should always explore and have down-time while studying as it can sometimes get overwhelming.

Alice Olivia Lee, BA History

Lee

Alice Olivia Lee
BA History, Year 1

What made you choose this course?
It’s focus on decolonisation, which is too often overlooked in mainstream history, I found interesting as I had never studied the ‘Extra-European’ world in any depth before.

What made you choose LSE?
I liked the flexibility within the LSE’s degree programmes and the focus the School gives to interdisciplinary approaches to study. The international dimension of the History department (and school as a whole) was definitely one of the main attractions for me!

What are the benefits of studying in London?
There are constantly things going on in the city 24/7. London is one of those places that I feel you will never tire of as it is impossible to see everything it has to offer.

What do you hope to gain from your degree?
I hope to gain a better insight into different countries and cultures around the world. Aside from the academic credentials, the like-minded, and yet diverse, friends I will have met along the way during my studies is something I believe my degree will have enabled.

What are your future prospects (after your degree)?
I have not currently got one set path in mind but the only certainty is that I want to work or study internationally. This will either be my continuing onto a Master’s course abroad or taking up a training contract with an international law firm. With my current interests I can see myself going into law, NGO work, journalism or politics. I am fortunate enough that the breadth and prestige of my degree should allow me to take up any of these paths.

Favourite place to study
Foyles bookshop by Tottenham Court Road has a lively cafe on the 5th floor which is where I  wander when the library on campus is too busy or I need a change of scenery.

If you could bring one famous historical person back to life, who would it be and why?
Tony Benn. He was a British MP of great integrity and someone I have always been fascinated with politically. During his many, many years in Parliament he showed great foresight on a number of issues, seen with his opinions of the interventions in Libya and Iraq. I feel he would be able to offer a great insight into the current Brexit situation.

What is the most memorable place you have ever visited and why?
Zanzibar in Tanzania. I worked on a UK government funded project there, through VSO-ICS, where I lived with a host family. Living on an island with such an array of diverse cultures really opened my eyes to differents ways of living & I also made lots of lifelong friends from that period. It was in the historically-rich Zanzibar where I began to grow an interest in the effects of colonial rule on the nations in Africa. I read Walter Rodney’s ‘How Europe Underdeveloped Africa’ during my time there and this really influenced the academic interests I hold at present.

Any tips for news students joining LSE?
Don’t be intimidated as you deserve to be here. Make the most out of being at a wonderfully diverse university and join societies which interest you to meet like-minded people. Also take advantage of being in London, it’s easy to get trapped in the LSE bubble of study-eat-sleep-repeat, make time to do touristy things.

Olivia Young, BA History

Young

Olivia Young
BA History, Year 1

What made you choose this programme?
I love history, and I’ve known for years that I wanted to be an academic historian. And LSE offers one of the best history courses in the world; there are few better institutions in the world to be a member of the history department than at LSE.

What made you choose LSE?
I chose LSE because it is the home to some of the leading academics in my field, and many others, it encourages an interdisciplinary and self-directed approach, and there are so many opportunities for students to grow inside and outside of the classroom.

What are the benefits of studying in London?
1. The proximity to museums and world class libraries/research facilities. 2. Its connectivity to the rest of Europe, and the world. 3. The opportunities to experience the best of art, music, and other cultures.

What do you hope to gain from your degree?
I hope to gain a solid grounding in my subject and research techniques, a sense of how I can collaborate meaningfully with social scientists from other fields in my work, and a sense of my specific research interests going forward into an academic career.

What are your future prospects (after your degree)?
After I complete my degree, I would like to do a master’s degree and PhD, and, eventually, work as an academic. I am also interested in doing part-time work at various think tanks or as a foreign policy consultant for my chosen areas of research/language study.

Favourite place to study
Periodicals Reading Room, Senate House Library.

If you could bring one famous historical person back to life, who would it be and why?
If I could bring one famous historical figure back to life, it would be Michael Oakeshott. Dr. Oakeshott was a Cambridge professor famous for his philosophical work on conservatism, and influenced some of my favorite thinkers, like Elie Kedourie and Maurice Cowling. I would love to see what they got out of him first hand.

What is the most memorable place you have ever visited and why?
The most memorable place that I have ever visited is the British Museum at 8 o’clock on a Friday night. I had dreamed of going since I was in grade school, and actually having some of the galleries to myself, and seeing exhibits that I had only thought I would ever read about, the first time I visited was a breath-taking experience. That was my first week in London, and it made me truly grateful to have made it to LSE.

Any tips for news students joining LSE?
Always make a plan out your time and put your academic work at the top of the list. Take/audit classes that you’re interested in, even outside of your major. Don’t be afraid to ask a professor or class teacher for clarification or help. Read what you have to, but also read further down on the reading list. It’s worth it!