Events

Doing a PhD at the Department of Gender Studies

Hosted by the Department of Gender Studies

Zoom

Speakers

Zuzana Dančíková

Zuzana Dančíková

Alanah Mortlock

Alanah Mortlock

Niharika Pandit

Niharika Pandit

Florence Waller-Carr

Florence Waller-Carr

Claire Wilmot

Claire Wilmot

Chair

Tomás Ojeda

Tomás Ojeda

Join us for a conversation with some of our current PhD students about the PhD experience.

In this informal event organized by our current PhDs, meet six of them, at different stages along the journey and working in a variety of fields. They will share some stories about their own projects and the academic and professional journeys that led to them taking their PhD at the department, but the session is really an opportunity for you to ask them questions about choosing a programme, the application process, and PhD life. The majority of the session will be an informal Q&A format, so bring your queries and concerns!

Speakers:

Zuzana Dančíková started her ESRC-funded PhD in 2018. Focusing on father’s leaves in Slovakia, she explores the potential of policy to affect the sharing of paid and unpaid labor, and the factors constraining that potential. Zuzana previously worked as an analyst for the Slovak Ministry of Finance and Transparency International. She holds an MSc in Public Policy and Administration from the LSE, as well as an MA in Economic Policy and International Relations and a BA in European Studies and Media Studies from the Masaryk University.

Alanah Mortlock started her ESRC-funded PhD at the LSE Department of Gender Studies in 2019. Her research looks at how academic and popular discourses of “transracialism” interact with theorisations of Blackness, engaging a critical lens invested in Black feminist and trans scholarships and politics. Her research interests include Black feminisms, theorisations and epistemologies of Blackness, mixed-raceness and racial ambiguity, and the intersections of gender, race and sexuality. Alanah holds an MSc in Gender from the LSE and a BSc in Psychology from the University of Warwick. She is a member of the editorial collective for the Engenderings blog.

Niharika Pandit is a PhD researcher working on everyday politics of living under military occupation in the Kashmir Valley in the Department of Gender Studies, LSE. She graduated as a Felix scholar in Gender Studies from SOAS. Her research interests lie at the intersection of gender, sexuality, anti-colonial and anti-militarist feminist thought, and the politics of representation. She is a member of Engenderings editorial collective, and has previously worked in editorial, feminist research and practitioner roles. Her writings have appeared in Economic and Political Weekly, The Polis Project, Feminist Review blog, Association for Political and Legal Anthropology, among others.

Florence Waller-Carr started her ESRC funded research at the LSE Gender Department in 2020. Her research explores the discursive realities of the creation and implementation of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda and wider policy frameworks on gender, peace, and security; her research explores meaning making around two emerging issues within WPS; sexual and reproductive health rights and LGBTIQ+ rights. Florence has previously worked in Policy and Advocacy roles for Plan International and UN Women where her work focused on girls' rights in conflict and humanitarian contexts and youth advocacy. She is also the Co-Founder of 'Our Generation for Inclusive Peace' a global youth led initiative that works to make current structures and practice in peace and security spaces more inclusive, intersectional, and decolonised. Florence holds a master's degree in Women, Peace and Security from the LSE Gender Department and undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology from The University of Manchester. 

Claire Wilmot began her UKRI GCRF funded PhD in 2019. Her research examines how changes in law and policies around sexual and gender-based violence occur and are experienced at the level of implementation. Taking political “transitions” as a point of departure for analysis, her research explores how these moments may open opportunities to renegotiate gendered power in justice systems. Claire also works part time as a research officer on the UKRI GCRF Gender, Justice and Security Hub at LSE’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security. Prior to joining LSE, Claire worked at the Global Justice Lab at the University of Toronto, where she worked with government officials and civil society groups on applied research projects to support justice reform strategies in Nigeria, Canada, the United States, and Pakistan. She also worked as a research assistant at the Wayamo Foundation. She holds a Master of Global Affairs degree from the University of Toronto, and a Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University.

Tomás Ojeda (Chair) started his PhD in 2017. His research examines the affective and psychic life of “sexual diversity” and the transmission of diversity knowledges within Chile’s psy disciplines. His project also aims to interrogate psychology’s political place in the recent history of Chilean sexual and gender politics, and the temporalities at stake in doing diversity work in the present. Tomás is a member of the Engenderings editorial collective and has worked as a psychotherapist and an advisor in sex education.

From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.

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