Events

III events bring some of the world's biggest academic names to LSE to explore the challenge of global inequality.

Upcoming Events

Financial secrecy

Symposium on Systems of Financial Secrecy 

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute and Open Ownership

Wednesday 21 February 9.30am - 6.00pm. In-person and online event. Centre Building (CBG), Room 1.07

This one-day symposium co-organised by the III and Open Ownership, will bring together academics and practitioners working on a cross-section of issues that relate to systems of financial secrecy to share recent and ongoing research and discuss relevant policy developments. Systems of financial secrecy comprise the structures, actors and practices that allow activities such as tax avoidance, tax evasion and money laundering to take place and to go undetected.

The programme will curate speakers from across multiple disciplines and sectors with the aim of identifying and strengthening linkages between different approaches to research and practice on financial secrecy. The learnings from the symposium will contribute to finding the best approaches of tackling financial secrecy and its negative effects on social and economic inequalities.

The symposium will include three sessions: 1) Systems of financial secrecy in the UK, 2) Sanctions and national security, 3) Taxation, corruption, and public funds.

It will be followed by a networking reception.

Full agenda

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marc Morgan

More Unequal or Not as Rich? Dilemmas over Distributional National Accounts for Latin America

Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 27 February 12.30 to 1.30pm. Online and in-person public eventLSE Parish Building (PAR) Room LG.03. 

Speaker:

Dr Marc Morgan, Research and Teaching Fellow, University of Geneva (UNIGE)

Improving income inequality measures, so that they are more commensurate with official measures of economic growth, is high on the international statistical agenda. But how should income that is reported in commonly-used microeconomic data for inequality studies approximate income that is estimated from macroeconomic data for growth accounting? How new is this global initiative from a historical perspective, and how appropriate is it from a future perspective? This presentation will tackle these questions from the prism of progress we have made to date in Latin American countries following the international agenda. Reconciling micro and macro incomes present us with at least one dilemma: either the region is more unequal or it is not as rich as officially reported. A disaggregation of measures allows us to see what are the different contributions to distribution and redistribution in the region, both methodologically and politically. The continued pursuit of the international agenda needs to account for the wide discrepancies between data sources that we all commonly use, but until now for quite different purposes. 

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Liam byrne

The Inequality of Wealth: Why it matters and how to fix it

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Wednesday 28 February 2024, 6.30pm to 8.00pm. In-person and online event. Auditorium, Centre Building. 

Speakers:
Liam Byrne, Labour MP for Birmingham Hodge Hill

Professor Mike Savage, Martin White Professor of Sociology, LSE

Chair:

Dr Kirsten Sehnbruch, British Academy Global Professor, Distinguished Policy Fellow, and Acting Director at the International Inequalities Institute

The super-rich have never had it so good. But millions of us can’t afford a home, an education or a pension. And unless we change course soon, the future will be worse. Much worse. Yet, it doesn’t have to be like this. In his new book The Inequality of Wealth: why it matters and how to fix it, former Treasury Minister, Liam Byrne, explains the fast-accelerating inequality of wealth; warns how it threatens our society, economy, and politics; shows where economics got it wrong – and lays out a path back to common sense, with five practical new ways to rebuild an old ideal: the wealth-owning democracy. Liam Byrne draws on conversations and debates with former prime ministers, presidents and policymakers around the world together with experts at the OECD, World Bank, and IMF to argue that, after twenty years of statistics and slogans, it's time for solutions that aren’t just radical but plausible and achievable as well. Liam will discuss the themes of his new book with LSE's Mike Savage.

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nhat_an_trinh

The Principle of Dynastic Succession

Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 5 March 12.30 to 1.30pm. Online and in-person public eventLSE Parish Building (PAR) Room LG.03. 

Speaker:

Dr Nhat An Trinh, Research Officer, Institute for New Economic Thinking & Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

Mounting research documents that wealth strongly persists across generations. Inheritances and inter-vivo gifts from parents to children are key contributors to this persistence. Intergenerational transfers are yet not only made unequally between families. It has been shown that a substantial share of intergenerational transfers is also made unequally within families. In this study, we address this puzzle of unequal division and empirically investigate the distribution of intergenerational transfers through the lens of what we call the ‘principle of dynastic succession’. This principle states that intergenerational transfers are made such that the family and its wealth are carried on into the long-lasting future, leading to unequal division. Analyzing administrative data from the German inheritance and gift tax register (2007-2020), we argue that the principle is particularly salient in the presence of structuring assets (e.g. family business) and that its application varies along the estate distribution. Going beyond individual parent-child transactional relationships, the principle of dynastic succession allows to link intra-familial disparities to long-term persistence in overall wealth inequality more broadly.

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parliament

How can we tackle inequalities through British public policy?

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Tuesday 5 March 2024, 6.30pm to 8.00pm. In-person event. Centre Building (CBG) Auditorium. 

Speakers:
Professor Neil Lee, Professor of Economic Geography at the Department of Geography and Environment

Professor Mike Savage, Martin White Professor of Sociology, LSE 

Professor Tania Burchardt, Associate Professor, Department of Social Policy

Chair:

Professor Stephen Jenkins, Professor of Economic and Social Policy, Department of Social Policy

Inequality is at the heart of some of the most pressing issues facing people living in the UK today, from the cost-of-living crisis to racial inequity. With a general election on the horizon, it is more important than ever for policy to be informed by high quality research. By engaging with policymakers, practitioners and local communities, the International Inequalities Institute produces research that can influence policy in crucial ways. At this public event, researchers from across the International Inequalities Institute will discuss their work and how their findings could impact British public policy. Our panel of speakers will cover a range of topics, such as how we can improve the quality of employment, how to implement a levelling up agenda, and how we can tackle wealth inequality in the UK.

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JMBrock_2012_profile photo_jpg

Inequality of Opportunity and Investment Choices

Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 12 March 12.30 to 1.30pm. Online and in-person public event

LSE Cheng Kin Ku Building, Room 2.04 (CKK 2.04).  

Speaker:

Michelle Brock, Associate Director, Senior Research Economist, Office of the Chief Economist at European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Inequality of opportunity (IOp) leads to misallocation of human capital and can affect economies via its impact on individual economic decision making. This paper studies the impact of IOp on investment, using a laboratory experiment. We randomized IOp, then subjects chose to invest in a risky asset or savings. Our results suggest that IOp impacts investment choices only for people who are penalized by their circumstances and only once they learn the impact of IOp on their relative position in the income distribution. This disadvantaged group more often invests and invests higher shares of their earnings than the control and advantaged groups. The fact that both IOp and knowledge of relative position need to be present, for the impact on investment to materialize, points to the importance of peer effects, and social preferences more broadly, for understanding the effects of IOp on individual decision making.

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Roberto Iacono

Behavioral responses to wealth taxation: evidence from a Norwegian reform

Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 19 March 12.30 to 1.30pm. Online and in-person public eventLSE Cheng Kin Ku Building, Room 2.04 (CKK 2.04). 

Speaker:

Roberto Iacono, Associate Professor in Economics and Social Policy at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

We analyze behavioral responses to wealth taxation, estimating the causal effects of a unique municipal wealth tax reform in Norway. We exploit variation from the single-period municipal reform reducing the marginal tax rate (MTR) on wealth exclusively in the northern Norwegian municipality of Bø from 0.85% to 0.35%, since 2021. Mimicking the behaviour of a tax haven, Bø represents the first municipality to unilaterally reduce the municipal wealth tax rate since the establishment of wealth taxation in Norway in 1892. We document a significant 66.6% increase in average taxable wealth in response to a 1 percentage point drop in the wealth tax rate. The elasticity of taxable wealth increases to 71.6% when focusing exclusively on wealth taxpayers. We also estimate a significant but more modest 10.3% jump in the weighted mass of wealth taxpayers in the treated municipality. Non-real effects of the reform dominate: mobility of wealthy taxpayers appears as the major behavioral response to the change in the net tax rate, accounting for a staggering 79% of the post-treatment total net wealth in the treated municipality (up from 19% in the pre-reform period). These results emerge in a context with third-party reported wealth data with negligible measurement error, limited evidence of bunching, highly enforced residence-based wealth taxation, and a low degree of out-migration rates.

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Canary Wharf

The trading game

Hosted by the International Inequalities Institute

Speakers:
Gary Stevenson, economist and author

Join us at this event where Gary Stevenson will talk about his new book, The Trading Game: A Confession

Ever since he was a kid, kicking broken footballs on the streets of east London in the shadow of Canary Wharf's skyscrapers, Gary wanted something better. Then he won a competition run by a bank: 'The Trading Game'. The prize: a golden ticket to a new life, as the youngest trader in the whole city. But what happens when winning starts to feel like losing? When the easiest way to make money is to bet on millions becoming poorer and poorer - and, as the economy starts slipping off a precipice, your own sanity starts slipping with it? 

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EricaLagalisse-2022-©JustineLatour-CMYK-139-copy-2-1-Cropped-359x359

The Crypto-Utopian Occult Revival and Anti/Fascism

Part of the Inequalities Seminar Series

Tuesday 26 March 12.30 to 1.30pm. Online and in-person public eventLSE Cheng Kin Ku Building, Room 2.04 (CKK 2.04). 

Speaker:

Erica Lagalisse, Visiting Fellow, LSE III

In 2018 Erica Lagalisse wrote Occult Features of Anarchism (2019) as a fellow of the III, and now returns to tell us about how her post-pandemic popular education tour about “conspiracy theory”, which followed its launch and translation, has opened up into ethnographic research connecting contemporary New Age spirituality, the current “psychedelic renaissance” and eugenics in the 21st century.  Lagalisse illustrates how cosmopolitan “digital nomads” share fears of biotechnology manipulated by occult powers, but also similar hopes in psychedelics research, cryptocurrency and technology writ large as sources of social justice. 

Across this counterculture, cryptography and the blockchain are not only seen as powerful tools of social engineering and justice, but also continuous with the perennial “occult” magical tradition.  Funded largely by “cryptocurrency” themselves, “media shamans” entertain occult conspiracy in government, but also a general reverence for the power of the “occult”, a willingness to engage political action in the “occult” oneself, and a shared imagination that digitally perfecting the management of secrecy will somehow inaugurate social equality.

For more info on Lagalisse's podcast series 'Politics after the pandemic', see here: https://lagalisse.net/2024/01/23/podcast-politics-after-the-pandemic-at-the-sociological-review/

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india

The search for democracy in the world's largest democracy

Hosted by International Inequalities Institute, LSE Human Rights, Department of Anthropology and Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity

Tuesday 26 March 2024, 6.30pm to 8.00pm. In-person and online event. Centre Building (CBG) Auditorium. 

Speaker:
Professor Alpa Shah, Professor of Anthropology, LSE

Discussants:
Professor Christophe Jaffrelot,
 Avantha Chair and Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at the King's India Institute

Professor Tarun Khaitan, Professor (Chair) in Public Law, LSE

Priyanka Kotamraju, independent journalist from India

Chair:
Professor Deborah James, Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE 

Join us to launch and discuss Alpa Shah’s new book, The Incarcerations: BK-16 and the search for democracy in India.

As general elections fast approach in the world’s largest democracy, this event asks what democracy today must urgently ensure for our common future. In her latest book, Alpa Shah pulls back the curtain on Indian democracy to tell the remarkable and chilling story of the Bhima Koregaon case, in which 16 human rights defenders (the BK-16) – professors, lawyers, artists – have been imprisoned, without credible evidence and without trial, as Maoist terrorists. The BK-16 were accused of inciting violence and plotting to kill the Indian prime minister. But Professor Shah finds a shocking case of cyber warfare - hacked emails, mobile phones and implantation of electronic evidence used to make the arrests. Diving deep into the lives of the BK-16, The Incarcerationsshows how the case is a bellwether for the collapse of democracy and why these events matter to all of us.

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climate change

Workshop on climate change and inequality

Hosted by International Inequalities Institute, and Queen Mary's, University of London

Friday 10 May 2024, 9.00am to 6.00pm. In-person and online event. Fawcett House, Room 9.04.

The Research Circle for the Study of Inequality and Poverty (QMUL) and the International Inequalities Institute (LSE) will host a workshop on climate change and inequality on the 10th of May 2024 at the London School of Economics. The keynote speaker for the workshop will be Professor Lord Nicholas Stern, IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at the Department of Economics and Chair of Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics.

Researchers are invited to submit long abstracts (1000 words) or complete papers by 23rd February 2024. Authors selected for the workshop will present their full papers in a workshop on 10th May 2024.

Please find the full call for papers here.

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Labour

Labour Inequalities Bound In Histories Of The Colonial And Postcolonial: A Workshop On Impact And Knowledge Exchange

Hosted by International Inequalities Institute

Monday 20 May, and Tuesday 21 May 2024, 9.30am to 5.00 pm. In-person and online event. Marshall Building, Room 1.07.

This workshop aims to deepen theoretical knowledge of the impacts of colonialism by exploring marginalized and disadvantaged cohorts who remained invisible at the formal close of empire in South Asia (1947 onwards) and the aftermath. Categories who have gone unnoticed, unaccounted, and remained hidden or have escaped our attention. What was the relationship of these groups to the colonial state, economy, and civic society? How did they confront colonial practices? What kind of knowledge systems, skill sets, labour and world views were they able to offer that met with biases and omissions? Did they see the later as transformational? Did the postcolonial moment alter their circumstances by opening new economic pathways, identities, resistance, migration avenues, social mobility, and a diverse set of experiences? Or did the postcolonial moment deepen existing inequalities that remain bound up in colonial histories? Crucially, the workshop aims to explore approaches that prioritize decoloniality, coloniality and postcoloniality. We seek papers that can offer new insights to discuss and advance debates through fresh ideas, rigorous knowledge exchange, and impactful evidence. 

Researchers are invited to submit abstracts (150 - 200 words) or complete papers by 29th February 2024

Please find the full call for papers here.

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Previous Events

Catch up on all of our past events here.