David Pinzur

David Pinzur

Assistant Professor

Department of Sociology

Room No
STC S217A
Languages
English
Key Expertise
Markets, Finance, Knowledge, Science, Technology

About me

I joined the London School of Economics as an Assistant Professor in 2020, following my Ph.D. studies at the University of California, San Diego and postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne. My research interests span the sociology of (financial) markets, science and technology, culture, and environmental sociology. At the broadest level, my work is concerned with two related processes: first, how market exchange, calculation, and regulation are enabled through the construction of intertwined material and social devices; second, how the features of these sociomaterial infrastructures feed back into behavior on markets and beyond.

I am currently exploring these processes in two projects. The first looks at the construction of agricultural futures markets in the decades following the U.S. Civil War. Focusing on the cases of Chicago and New Orleans, this research traces how economic, cultural, organizational, and material differences in the extant agricultural trade led the markets to adopt dissimilar derivative infrastructures. It additionally demonstrates how these infrastructures underlaid and supported distinct styles of traing on the two markets. A second, contemporary project investigates the role of crude oil derivative markets in coordinating expectations of the future among parties as diverse as banks, hedge funds, state and private statistical agencies, policymakers, price reporting agencies, and oil companies. This research aims to uncover new elements of the relation between price and prediction, as well as to understand how oil’s construction as a financial product relates to its resilience as an energy source.

Journal publications

Pinzur, David (2016) Making the grade: infrastructural semiotics and derivative market outcomes on the Chicago Board of Trade and New Orleans Cotton Exchange, 1856–1909. Economy and Society, 45 (3-4). pp. 431-453

Work in progress

“How practitioners develop economic ideas: infrastructure, ontology, and endogeneity.”

"Price & prediction in the crude oil market"