Events

Visions for Social Progress: the future of social policy

Hosted by the Department of Social Policy

Old Theatre, Old Building

Speakers

Professor Bea Cantillon

Professor Bea Cantillon

Professor Philippe van Parijs

Professor Philippe van Parijs

Professor Fiona Williams

Professor Fiona Williams

Chair

Dr Timo Fleckenstein

This panel discussion will explore different visions for social progress and the future of social policy with prominent scholars in the field. 

Social policy faces multiple challenges. The stubborn persistence of poverty and the rise of inequality in particular call for new initiatives that address the increasing social polarisation in societies across the globe. But what are the policy options for social progress? Does social policy need a radical “re-think” to deal with the challenges of the twenty-first century? If so, what are the social policy futures that would allow more egalitarian societies? And, what are the political forces for new progressive social policy projects? 

This event will provide insights into different reform options for social policy in the face of socio-economic, socio-demographic and socio-political challenges, and explore different visions for social progress and the future of social policy.

Bea Cantillon is Professor of Social Policy and Director of the Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy at the University of Antwerp. She has published widely on poverty, social policy, social security, the welfare state, and gender.

Philippe van Parijs (@pvpbrussels) is a political philosopher and political economist, best known as a proponent and main defender of the concept of universal basic income. He is one of the founders of the Basic Income European Network (BIEN), which became in 2004 the Basic Income Earth Network, and he chairs its International Board.

Fiona Williams is a Professor Emeritus of Social Policy at the University of Leeds and an Honorary Professor at the Social Policy Research Unit, University of New South Wales. She has written widely on gender, 'race' and ethnicity in social policy, and she is currently writing an analysis of the past forty years of critical thinking in social policy.

Timo Fleckenstein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy.

The Department of Social Policy at LSE (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world.

Twitter hashtag for this event: #LSEsocialprogress

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From time to time there are changes to event details, so we strongly recommend that you check back on this listing on the day of the event if you plan to attend.

Whilst we are hosting this listing, LSE Events does not take responsibility for the running and administration of this event. While we take responsible measures to ensure that accurate information is given here (for instance by checking the room has been booked) this event is ultimately the responsibility of the organisation presenting the event. 

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