Department seminars ISPP

Department of Social Policy seminars

International Social and Public Policy seminar series

This seminar series brings together international scholars working on topics relevant to social policy and public policy in a global context. Participants comprise eminent external speakers alongside faculty from the Department of Social Policy at the LSE. They present new and cutting edge research applied to social policy questions from multiple disciplines, including sociology, criminology, education, demography, anthropology and economics. The series provides the opportunity for social policy faculty, researchers and PhD students to participate in an academic community of interest and encounter multi- and interdisciplinary approaches across a range of social policy issues. The seminars are open to staff and students from across the LSE and beyond.

All seminars in this years series will take place online on Tuesdays, from 5.00pm-6.00pm. 

Summer Term schedule will be posted here in due course

 

Catch up on all of our 2020/21 seminars via our YouTube channel here.

 

Archive- LT 2021

 

Which integration policies work? The heterogeneous impact of policies and institutions on immigrants’ labor market success in Europe
Speaker: Professor Lucinda Platt (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

23 March 2021

Which integration policies work? The heterogeneous impact of policies and institutions on immigrants’ labor market success in Europe

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Lucinda Platt (Department of Social Policy, LSE)
Chair: Dr Berkay Ozcan (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

Abstract
Can specific policies support the economic integration of immigrants? Despite the crucial importance of this question, existing evidence is inconclusive. Using pooled data from the European Social Survey, we estimate the effects of integration and antidiscrimination policies, alongside social expenditure and labor market regulation on the labor market performance of 6,176 non-EU immigrants across 23 European countries. By contrast with previous studies, we investigate the distinct role of discrete policy areas, we allow for heterogeneous effects and we focus on occupational success while accounting for selection into employment. Our results provide little support for the role of policies facilitating the realization of immigrants’ human capital. However, we find that antidiscrimination policies are associated with greater occupational success. This is the case for women immigrants overall, but only for skilled and non-Muslim immigrant men. 

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Unidentical Twins? Comparing Social Policy Responses to COVID-19 in North America
Speaker: Professor Daniel Béland (McGill University)

16 March 2021

Unidentical Twins? Comparing Social Policy Responses to COVID-19 in North America

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Daniel Béland (McGill University)
Chair: Dr Timo Fleckenstein

Abstract
In the social policy and health care literature, it is common to compare Canada and the United States, these North American “unidentical twins” that have so much in common and yet that are so different from each another in areas like health care and political institutions. How have these two “unidentical twins” responded to COVID-19 and how have political and institutional factors shaped their distinct policy responses to the crisis? Focusing on social protection, this talk compares the policy responses to COVID-19 in the United States and in Canada.   

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Demographic Change and Perceptions of Racism
Speaker: Christopher Maggio (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

9 March 2021

Demographic Change and Perceptions of Racism

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Christopher Maggio (Department of Social Policy, LSE)
Chair: Professor Lucinda Platt

Abstract:
Various research has demonstrated that rapid racial demographic change may aid in triggering various forms of backlash under certain conditions. This has led scholars to speak of Whites “defending” their local environment in the face of eroding racial dominance. However, little research has addressed how perceptions of racism among minorities may be triggered under conditions of demographic change. This study attempts to fill this gap in the literature by examining the relationship between racial demographic change for Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians and perceptions of racial problems among these groups. I find that Blacks and Hispanics living in counties undergoing rapid growth of Black and Hispanic populations, respectively, have higher perceptions of racial problems.

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Poverty Among the Working Age Population in Post-Industrial Democracies (with some comments on inequality)
Speaker: Professor Evelyne Huber (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

2 March 2021

Poverty Among the Working Age Population in Post-Industrial Democracies (with some comments on inequality)

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Evelyne Huber (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Chair: Dr Timo Fleckenstein

Abstract
Both pre- and post-tax and transfer poverty among the working age population have increased over the past three decades in post-industrial democracies. Economic and demographic changes, along with changes in labor market institutions are responsible for rising market income poverty. However, welfare states have also exhibited declining effectiveness in reducing poverty. We measure welfare state effort with social rights rather than expenditures, which allows us to separate the effect of policy from need, which jointly shape expenditure. We pool data from LIS, the OECD, and SILC (Eurostat Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) for 22 post-industrial democracies. 

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Tense times for young migrants: Temporality, life-course, and immigration status
Speaker: Dr Vanessa Hughes (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

23 February 2021

Tense times for young migrants: Temporality, life-course, and immigration status

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Vanessa Hughes (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

Abstract: 
This paper examines the intersection between immigration status, life-course, and the experience of time. Based on ethnographic research, it looks at how time and life-course transitions are experienced by young people who are in constant encounter with the immigration regime in the UK. The encounters at this intersection produce a complex landscape that young people must navigate during their transitions to adulthood, producing a messy and complex temporal matrix. This temporal matrix distinctly shapes young people’s lives and migration experience: a sense of waiting and feeling stuck before getting status; paradoxical adulthood transitions for young people throughout the application process; and long-term uncertainty that is produced as a result of the immigration regime. 

Presentation slides

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Poverty, Not the Poor
Speaker: Professor David Brady (University of California, Riverside)

16 February 2021

Poverty, Not the Poor

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor David Brady (University of California, Riverside)

Abstract
Scholars, commentators, politicians and the public tend to think about American poverty as a 'problem of persons.' The poor are in poverty because of individuals' bad behavior, risks, pathological cultures, or innate traits. This leads us to concentrate on the poor as individuals and distracts us from the systemic problem of high poverty in the U.S. On one hand, many aim to "fix the poor" by focusing on behavior and culture, mistakenly arguing that fixing behavior, eliminating risks, and improving culture would substantially reduce poverty. On the other hand, many "dramatize the poor" by focusing on emotive selections of poor people, exotifying and mischaracterizing the population in poverty. Several examples from recent research will be presented to show how both approaches concentrate on the poor and misunderstand poverty. Political and structural theories of poverty will be advanced as a better way to understand poverty and not just the poor.

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Does Incarceration Shape Trust in the State, Community Engagement, and Civic Participation?
Speaker: Professor Chris Wildeman (Duke University)

9 February 2021

Does Incarceration Shape Trust in the State, Community Engagement, and Civic Participation?

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Chris Wildeman (Duke University)

Abstract: 
In this article, we provide the most complete assessment to date of how incarceration is associated with trust in the state, community engagement, and civic participation in the contemporary United States using data from the Family History of Incarceration Survey (FamHIS). The results support three conclusions. First, own incarceration is associated with a deep distrust of state institutions even after adjusting for a host of possible confounders and matching on observed characteristics. Second, family member incarceration is also associated with distrust of state institutions, but these differences are roughly half the magnitude of the associations tied to own incarceration. These first two conclusions strongly mirror findings from existing research, suggesting that the FamHIS data can provide reliable estimates of how incarceration shapes community engagement and civic participation. Finally, and in a significant break from most existing research in this area, neither own incarceration nor family member incarceration is significantly associated with any of the 14 indicators of community and political participation we consider in any of the total of 84 models we run on participation (14 outcomes, 3 models per outcome, models including both own incarceration and family member incarceration). Although the cross-sectional nature of our data precludes strong causal claims, we see this third finding as providing important evidence that while there may well be heterogenous effects of incarceration on community engagement and civic participation, it appears that these heterogenous effects largely cancel each other out.

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The normativity of marriage and the marriage premium for children’s outcomes
Speaker: Professor Florencia Torche (Stanford University)

2 February 2021

The normativity of marriage and the marriage premium for children’s outcomes

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Florencia Torche (Stanford University)

Abstract
Children born to married parents have better health, behavioral, educational, and economic outcomes than children of unmarried mothers. This association, known as the “marriage premium” has been interpreted as emerging from the selectivity of parents who marry and from a positive effect of marriage. We suggest that the positive effect of marriage could be contextual, emerging from the normativity of marriage in society. We test this hypothesis using the case of Chile, where marital fertility dropped sharply from 66 percent of all births in 1990 to 27 percent in 2016. We find that the benefit of marriage for infant health was large in the early 1990s but declined as marital fertility became less normative in society, to fully disappear in 2016. Multivariate analysis of temporal variation, multilevel models of variation across place, sibling fixed-effects models, and a falsification test consistently indicate that marriage has a beneficial effect when marital fertility is normative and a weak or null effect when is not. Generalizing from this case, we discuss contextual effects of diverse practices and statuses.

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Inequalities in Breastfeeding in the U.S. across the 20th Century
Speaker: Dr Vida Maralani (Cornell University)

26 January 2021

Inequalities in Breastfeeding in the U.S. across the 20th Century

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Vida Maralani (Cornell University)

Abstract
Using data from nationally representative surveys fielded between 1965 and 2011, we assemble cohort data for mothers born from 1910 to 1990 and their breastfeeding practices. We use these data to investigate how and when breastfeeding became a practice differentiated by socioeconomic status. We answer the following research questions: (1) When did socioeconomic inequalities in breastfeeding emerge, and how do these differ by social category (education, race, marital status) across the century? (2) What role do the dramatic changes in family formation that emerged in the 1970s, including non-marital childbearing and the massive divergence of fertility timing by race and education play in explaining persistent SES differences in breastfeeding practices? (3) Are the observed patterns consistent with cultural explanations that argue that breastfeeding is a predominantly class-based practice that is closely related to a commitment to intensive parenting and the accompanying resources to realize this commitment child investment?

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Family structure and gender ideologies of youth in Britain
Speaker: Professor Pia Schober (University of Tübingen)

19 Jaunary 2021

Family structure and gender ideologies of youth in Britain

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Pia Schober (University of Tübingen)

Abstract:
Despite growing diversity of family forms, gender socialisation research has focused on biological two-parent families. This study extends existing research by describing parental influences on British adolescents’ gender ideologies across various family forms and examining alternative explanations including possible causal effects of parental separation.

Based on the UK Millennium Cohort Study, we follow about 8,000 families from childbirth to child age 14. We apply OLS regression models and fixed-effect panel models. Except for fathers’ gender ideologies, most parental influences on adolescents’ gender ideologies vary little across family forms. Parental separation does not consistently lead to more egalitarian ideologies of adolescents.  

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Archive- MT 2020

 

The Company We Keep Interracial Friendships and Romantic Relationships from Adolescence to Adulthood
Speaker: Professor Grace Kao (Yale University)

8 December 2020

The Company We Keep
Interracial Friendships and Romantic Relationships from Adolescence to Adulthood

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Grace Kao (Yale University)

Abstract: With hate crimes on the rise and social movements like Black Lives Matter bringing increased attention to the issue of police brutality, the American public continues to be divided by issues of race. How do adolescents and young adults form friendships and romantic relationships that bridge the racial divide? In The Company We Keep, sociologists Grace Kao, Kara Joyner, and Kelly Stamper Balistreri examine how race, gender, socioeconomic status, and other factors affect the formation of interracial friendships and romantic relationships among youth. They highlight two factors that increase the likelihood of interracial romantic relationships in young adulthood: attending a diverse school and having an interracial friendship or romance in adolescence.

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They Can’t All Be Stars: The Matthew Effect, Status Bias, and Status Persistence in NBA All-Star Elections
Speaker: Dr Thomas Biegert (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

1 December 2020

They Can’t All Be Stars: The Matthew Effect, Status Bias, and Status Persistence in NBA All-Star Elections

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Thomas Biegert (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

Abstract: What is the role of Matthew effects and status bias in status persistence? A large literature demonstrates biased evaluations of performance due to status signals, which results in cumulative (dis-)advantage. Characteristics signaling higher status lead individuals to assess comparable performances more positively, which results in an accumulation of advantages and higher inequality that is not grounded in actual performance differences. We use data on player performance in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and yearly elections to the NBA All-Star game to investigate whether becoming an All-Star increases the likelihood of being re-elected to become an All-Star in the following year. 

Presentation slides

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How combination and sequence of weather events shape Mexico-U.S. migration flows
Speaker: Professor Filiz Garip (Cornell University)

24 November 2020

How combination and sequence of weather events shape Mexico-U.S. migration flows

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Professor Filiz Garip (Cornell University)

Abstract:  Existing work presents mixed findings on the impact of weather events on international mobility. Relying on fine-grained data over a long time span (1980-2019) in the Mexico-U.S. setting, we turn to machine learning (ML) tools to first determine if weather events can predict migration choices of 150,000+ individuals. We use random-forest models which allow us to include a comprehensive list of weather indicators measured at various lags, and to consider complex interactions among the inputs. These models rely on data-driven model selection, optimize predictive performance, but often produce ‘black-box’ results. In our case, the results show that weather indicators offer at best a modest improvement in migration predictions. We then attempt to open the black box, and model the linkages between select weather indicators and migration choices. We find the combination of precipitation and temperature extremes and their particular sequencing to be crucial to predicting weather-driven migration responses out of Mexico. We also show heterogeneity in these responses by household wealth status. Specifically, we find that wealthier households in rural communities migrate in the immediate aftermath of a negative weather shock (relative to the ‘normal’ weather in their community), while poorer households need to experience a positive weather event following a negative one in order to migrate to the United States. This pattern suggests that migration as an adaptation strategy might be available to select households in the developing world, and the most vulnerable might be excluded from resorting on an international trip unless they experience particular sequences of weather events that allow them to raise the necessary funds first.

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Policy Capacity Matters for Capacity Development: Comparing Teacher In-service Training and Career Advancement in Basic Education Systems of India and China
Speaker: Dr Yifei Yan (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

17 November 2020

Policy Capacity Matters for Capacity Development: Comparing Teacher In-service Training and Career Advancement in Basic Education Systems of India and China

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Yifei Yan (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

Abstract:  It is widely accepted that capacity development (CD) is central to development administration, but many of these initiatives have failed to improve government effectiveness. This paper argues that CD should be built upon possessing the policy capacity to perform the analytical, operational and political functions necessary to make it effective. Drawing on the case of CD in the basic education sector, not only does the study reveal the extensive CD practices in India (Delhi) and China (Beijing), it also shows that variations on different dimensions of policy capacity jointly account for the observed differences in the effectiveness of such arrangements, especially as perceived by teachers. Therefore, without understanding and catering to the needs of the targets whose capacity is supposedly being developed, CD initiatives meant to be supportive are likely to be dissatisfying and disappointing instead.

Presentation slides

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Social class inequalities in school GCSE attainment – Mis-reading cultural capital
Speakers: Professor Vernon Gayle (University of Edinburgh), Dr Sarah Stopforth (University of Sussex)

10 November 2020

Social class inequalities in school GCSE attainment – Mis-reading cultural capital 

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speakers: Professor Vernon Gayle (University of Edinburgh), Dr Sarah Stopforth (University of Sussex)

Abstract: The qualifications that British children gain at school are strong determinants of their futures in both education and the labour market. General Certificates of Secondary Education (GCSEs) are the main qualifications undertaken by the majority of pupils in England. There are persistent social class inequalities in school GCSE outcomes, and empirical studies report the general finding that pupils from families in less advantaged social classes on average have poorer outcomes.

The Bourdieusian conception of cultural capital is advanced as a theoretical explanation of children’s unequal scholastic outcomes. The importance of cultural capital has recently been recognised and incorporated into the school inspection framework. In this presentation we investigate the role of cultural capital in school GCSE outcomes.

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From the Local to the Global: Care Chains, Ageing and Futurity through the Indian Ayah
Speaker: Dr Shalini Grover (International Inequalities Institute, LSE)

3 November 2020

From the Local to the Global: Care Chains, Ageing and Futurity through the Indian Ayah

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Shalini Grover (International Inequalities Institute, LSE)

Abstract: The seminar will trace the dynamic formation of Global Care Chains (GCCs) from local settings in urban India, demonstrating how ayahs/caregivers’ movements stretch across different geopolitical locales. Their movements obfuscate the South-North, South-South and North-North migration divide. My seminar will demarcate the localization of globalization; how do female domestic workers in India’s Capital become highly transnational and mobile? I offer a substantial ethnography of GCCs through the eyes off an all-rounder ayah Mary, with her work trajectory having spanned three decades of intimate service with diplomats and global elites. 

Presentation slides

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Mechanisms of Matthew effects in social investment
Speaker: Dr Amelia Peterson (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

28 October 2020

Mechanisms of Matthew effects in social investment

Seminar series on International Social and Public Policy

Speaker: Dr Amelia Peterson

Abstract: Social investment is an approach to public policy which aims to enhance social welfare through the formation of skills and human capital. The social investment paradigm has been troubled by the discovery of Matthew effects, often described as the monopolisation of new investments by already advantaged groups. Integrating theory from economics, sociology and psychology, tested in four cases of the expansion of upper secondary education, this paper explains how Matthew effects in skill formation have developed not only through the monopolisation of resources, but from changes in the conditions for affiliation (the ability of students to sort themselves between schools) and signalling (the ability to accurately communicate skills to higher education or employers). While inequities in resources are increasingly monitored as part of social policy provision, those in affiliation and signalling are not. Making visible the gap between what is monitored and what is valued in skill formation is a vital step towards more equitable social investment.


Presentation slides

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Archive- 2017-2019

2019/20

SunilKUMAR

29 January 2020

‘Emplaced’ Indian Construction Labour-Camps: The Architecture of Discipline and the Limits to Collective Action.

Speaker: Dr Sunil Kumar

Speaker's bio:
Sunil Kumar, Social Policy, co-teaches on the MSc Social Policy and Development and is the sole convenor of a half-unit option entitled Urbanisation and Social Policy in the Global South

Read more here.

 

JohannKOEHLER

11th December 2019

Experimental Criminology and the Free-Rider Problem

Speakers: Dr Johann Koehler (LSE, Department of Social Policy) and Tobias Smith (UC-Berkeley)

Speakers' bios:
Johann Koehler is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy. Read more here.

Tobias Smith is a PhD Candidate in Jurisprudence and Social Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He also holds a J.D. from Berkeley Law. His research focuses on the death penalty and punishment in China.

 

VanesssaHUGHES

30th October 2019

Collaborative ethnography and its limitations: Researching young migrants in London

Speaker: Vanessa Hughes

Speaker's bio:
Vanessa Hughes is a LSE Fellow in Social policy since September 2019. Read more here.

 

 

2018/19

ISPP seminar Alice and Femi

13 March 2019

Challenging dominant social policy assumptions; an apprenticeship for young people with multiple problems and needs.

Speakers: Alice Sampson and Femi Ade-Davis

Speakers' bios:
Alice Sampson is a Research Associate at the Mannheim Centre for Crime and Criminology.  Her interests include researching crime prevention community-based initiatives in places with low incomes and high levels of violence. Alice has published in British Journal of CriminologyBritish Journal of Social Work and Youth Studies and her current research includes assessing the impact of violence reduction initiatives in Jamaica and South Africa.

Femi Ade-Davis is the project manager for Shoreditch Trust’s Blue Marble Training programme which engages with and supports young people with multiple barriers to social inclusion and independence. 

 

Herd and Moynihan

27 February 2019

Administrative Burden: Policymaking by Other Means

Speakers: Professor Pamela Herd and Professor Donald Moynihan

Speakers' bios:
Pamela Herd is a Professor of Public Policy at Georgetown University and is currently a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, University of Oxford.  Her research examines how social conditions, including social policies, influence inequality over the life course. She is also expert in survey research and biodemographic methods, serving as Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study and Chair for the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey.

Donald Moynihan is the inaugural McCourt Chair at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, and a Visiting Professor at Oxford University. Moynihan has presented his research on public sector performance to policymakers at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, the World Bank and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post and other media outlets.

 

Maurizio Bussolo

30 January 2019

Towards a New Social Contract - Taking on Distributional Tensions in Europe and Central Asia

Speaker: Maurizio Bussolo

Speaker's bio
Maurizio Bussolo, lead economist at the World Bank, has been working on quantitative analyses of economic policy and development with research interests spanning both micro and macroeconomic topics. He has led operational teams in the aftermath of the 2008-09 crisis negotiating with Latin American LAC governments implementation of reforms to shield the most vulnerable. He previously worked at the OECD, at the Overseas Development Institute in London, and at Fedesarrollo and the Los Andes University in Colombia. He has extensively published in peer-reviewed journals on trade, growth, poverty and income distribution. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Warwick.

LewisDavid

31 October 2018

How useful is Gillian Hart's Distinction between 'Little d' and 'Big D' Development? Theoretical Reflections, a Case Study, and some Lessons for Social Policy

Speaker: Professor David Lewis, LSE

Speaker's bio
David Lewis is professor of social policy and development. His main research interests include international development policy, the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society in social and public policy, and rural development in the Global South. More information.

 

 

2017/18

lars_osberg

16 May 2018

Health implications of Economic Insecurity

Speaker: Professor Lars Osberg

Speaker's bio:
Lars Osberg is currently McCulloch Professor of Economics at Dalhousie University, Halifax.  His current research emphasizes the implications of increasing inequality and the measurement, implications and determinants of economic insecurity, poverty and inequality of opportunity. Among other professional responsibilities, he was President of the Canadian Economics Association in 1999-2000.

MikeSHINER

7 March 2018

Police Reform and the Politics of Denial: An Academic's Journey into "Activism".

Speaker: Dr Michael Shiner, LSE

Speaker's bio
Michael Shiner is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy. More information.

Rita Nikolai

21 February 2018

Political Parties and Private Schools: A Comparative Analysis of Policy and Politics in England and Germany

Speaker: Dr Rita Nikolai, Humboldt University, Berlin

Speaker's bio
Rita Nikolai holds a Heisenberg fellowship, which is affiliated with the Institute for Education Studies at the Humboldt-University. Nikolais research focuses on education policy, theories of institutional change, and, more recently the private school development in liberal welfare states.

Christina Gibson Davis

24 January 2018

The Kids Are Alright: The Rise in Non-Marital Births and Child Well-being

Speaker: Professor Christina Gibson-Davis, Duke University

Speaker's bio
Christina M. Gibson-Davis is an associate professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, with a secondary appointment in sociology. Her research interests center around social and economic differences in family formation patterns. Her current research focuses on the how divergent patterns of family formation affect economic inequality.

McmanusIan

10 January 2018

The Politics of Post-Crisis European Social Spending

Speaker: Dr Ian McManus, LSE

Speaker's bio
Ian McManus is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. 

BernhardEbbinghaus

22 November 2017

Accumulation or Absorption? The Development of Household Non-Employment in Europe during the Great Recession

Speakers: Professor Bernhard Ebbinghaus, University of Oxford, Dr Thomas Biegert, LSE

Speakers' bios
Bernhard Ebbinghaus is Professor of Social Policy at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at University of Oxford. His research focuses on advanced welfare states in Europe and overseas facing reform pressures due to ongoing globalization, demographic ageing and socio-economic changes.

Thomas Biegert is a Fellow in Social Policy at LSE. His main research interests are in welfare states and labour markets and how they shape social inequality and stratification. 
More information.

HayleyJones

15 November 2017

Great Expectations: Long-term Poverty Reduction, Intergenerational Change and Young Beneficiaries’ Aspirations in Brazil’s Bolsa Família Programme

Speaker: Dr Hayley Jones, LSE

Speaker's bio
Hayley is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Social Policy, where she teaches international and comparative social policy and development and social policy.  Her background is in Development Studies, with a focus on social policy in Latin America. More information.

GertJanVeerman

18 October 2017

Ethnic school composition and multiple ethnic identity formation of adolescents in the Netherlands

Speaker: Dr Gert-Jan Veerman, Ede Christian University of Applied Sciences

Speaker's bio
Gert-Jan M. Veerman was a primary school teacher for more than ten years in various Dutch primary schools. He holds a PhD in sociology from the University of Amsterdam. He currently is a lecturer at the Ede Christian University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands and fellow at the College for Interdisciplinary Educational Research in Germany.

SimonBurgess

11 October 2017

Inter-ethnic relations of teenagers in England’s schools: the role of school and neighbourhood ethnic composition

Speaker: Professor Simon Burgess, University of Bristol

Speaker's bio 
Simon Burgess is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics, at the University of Bristol . Simon is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor.  He is a labour economist, and for the last ten years or so his research interests have been in the economics of education. Read more.