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About

Centre for Women, Peace and Security


 

 

 

 

 

 

The cooperation with the Centre has been instrumental in complementing the support we provide to human rights mechanisms... It has allowed us to rely on leading expertise to unpack complex human rights issues and ensure the experts receive top quality advice on the latest normative developments and related research.

Veronica Birga, Chief, Women's Human Rights and Gender Section, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 

The LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security is an academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world.    

Through innovative research, teaching, and multi-sectoral engagement, the Centre for Women, Peace and Security aims to promote gender equality and enhance women’s economic, social and political participation and security.   

Objectives

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To be a global leader in research relating to women, peace and security, women’s human rights, and sexual violence in conflict-affected settings.

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To provide a world-leading programme of education in the field of women, peace and security.

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To be a hub of cross-sectoral partnerships and engagement.

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To influence the women, peace and security agenda and global policy-making to improve women’s economic, social and political participation and security.

Origins

The Centre for Women, Peace and Security is grounded in two initiatives:

  • The United Nations women and peace and security agenda, which began in 2000 with the adoption of Security Council Resolution 1325. UNSCR 1325 recognised the gendered impact of conflict and post-conflict situations on women and girls, and acknowledged the importance of the participation and representation of women and the inclusion of a gender perspective in preventing, managing, and resolving conflicts and maintaining international peace and security. 
  • The Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative, which was launched by William Hague, then UK Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, and Angelina Jolie, UNHCR Special Envoy. PSVI focusses on ending sexual violence in armed conflict, achieving accountability, and ending impunity for harms committed. 

Funding

The Centre for Women, Peace and Security is an independent academic unit dedicated to the promotion of justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. We welcome the support and engagement of partners, allies and funders who share our commitment to promoting gender equality and enhancing women’s security and economic, social and political participation.

The Centre for Women, Peace and Security was launched in 2015 with the support of the UK Government via the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative.

2016 / 2017 Funders:

  • The UK Department for International Development
  • The Wellcome Trust
  • LSE Annual Fund
  • LSE IGA / Rockefeller Resilience Fund
  • LSE Knowledge Exchange Fund

What people have said 

By founding this Centre LSE is setting an impressive example to other universities in the UK and around the world. I'm delighted that as we take forward the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative we'll be able to work with the UK's first academic centre on Women, Peace and Security at the LSE, providing the ideas and rigorous academic understanding needed to expand equal rights, equal freedom and equal opportunity for women everywhere.

William Hague, Visiting Professor in Practice, speaking at the launch of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security in 2015 

The cooperation with the Centre has been instrumental in complementing the support we provide to human rights mechanisms in the development of their guidance. It has allowed us to rely on leading expertise to unpack complex human rights issues and ensure the experts receive top quality advice on the latest normative developments and related research.

Veronica Birga, Chief, Women's Human Rights and Gender Section Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

It was a great privilege for the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women to participate in the Expert Group Meeting at LSE to work on the update of draft general recomendation No. 19. We benefitted from discussions of the Director and fellows of the Centre, who were all prominent experts on the issue of gender-based violence. The work of the CEDAW Committee has been enriched by the expertise and knowledge that was transferred from the experts at the EGM.

Yoko Hayashi, Former Chairperson, UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women

The meetings added value to our work by providing the external expertise of academicians and practitioners (who) challenged our assumptions and provided us with a unique opportunity to think outside the box and push the boundaries a bit further.

Nahla El Addal Haidar, Member, UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women

We need the next generation of educated youth with inquisitive minds and fresh energy, who are willing not only to sit in the classroom but also go out into the field and the courtrooms and to make a decisive difference.

Angelina Jolie, Visiting Professor in Practice, speaking at the launch of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security in 2015

For the last 16 years the UK has been at the forefront of international efforts to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda. It is only fitting that the UK is now home to such a leading academic institution on the issue. In its first year, the LSE Centre's research programmes have already made an invaluable contribution to the development of government policy on SCR 1325. Their educational activities will ensure the next generation of policy makers understand the importance - and relevance - of this agenda to a wide variety of disciplines. I look forward to seeing the Centre develop even further over the next few years.

Rt Hon Baroness Anelay of St Johns DBE, Minister of State for the Commonwealth and the UN at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Prime Minister's Special Representative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict

The LSE WPS Centre is already providing an eminent academic focus on the Women, Peace and Security agenda. It convenes important dialogue between government, academia, NGOs and those working at grassroots in conflict countries. I have seen first-hand the valuable role that the Centre is playing and think that it has the potential to become even more influential on this important agenda.

Baroness Hodgson of Abinger, CBE, Chair of the Advisory Board of Gender Action for Peace and Security (GAPS) and Co-Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group on Women, Peace and Security 

 

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Contact us

Telephone

+44(0)20 3486 2959

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Centre for Women, Peace & Security, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

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