Cyberdomain

International Law in the Cyber Domain

Intensive two-day course

Dates: 1-2 March 2018 

This programme examines the international legal frameworks that apply in the digital domain. Although States have accepted that international law – including the United Nations Charter and human rights law – does apply, reaching agreement as to the content of the rules and how they apply has been elusive.  Understanding precisely how the law operates in cyberspace is critical to the maintenance of global peace and security and to the promotion of human rights.  In this course we will focus primarily on the responsibility of States in this dynamic and ever-changing realm in both peace- and war-time. We will explore a host of questions.  What is a cyber attack?  What actions may states lawfully take against such attacks whether mounted by states or non-state actors, including terrorists?  Is the nature of the target of the attack relevant and, if so, why?  Is a cyber weapons treaty necessary?  How does international law regulate cyber espionage?  Does existing international human rights law adequately protect against rights violations, including, for example, digital surveillance or on-line criminal activities?     

This course will explore the relationship between different legal regimes – public international law, international human rights law and international humanitarian law – and show how they work together and complement each other in the cyber domain.  The final session of the course will require participants to work on a group exercise involving the application of the law to a series of digital incidents. 

At the course's conclusion, participants will have a strong understanding of how the different international legal regimes apply in cyberspace, as well as an insight into the normative gaps and issues that remain contested by the advent of this technology. A certificate of attendance from the Centre for the Study of Human Rights at LSE will be awarded to all who successfully complete the course. 

Course components

  • Sovereignty, jurisdiction and due diligence in the cyber domain
  • State responsibility in cyberspace: counter-measures and necessity
  • Cyber-espionage
  • The use of force and self-defence in cyberspace
  • The scope and content of international human rights law in the cyber domain
  • On-line criminal activities
  • Cyberwarfare and international humanitarian law
  • Regulating cyber weapons

Why take this course?

  • Provides an in-depth analysis of international law in the cyber domain in both peace-time and armed conflict
  • Offers access to leading legal experts in the field of international law in the cyber domain
  • Provides an opportunity to gain a nuanced understanding of the responsibilities of states in a digital age
  • Engages with contemporary questions of critical importance
  • Explains the particular challenges that arise in the digital domain
  • Provides a strong theoretical understanding of some of the key issues of our times
  • Participants will be provided with detailed course materials created for each session and a comprehensive collection of relevant international documents
  • Participants will also have full access and borrowing rights at the LSE Library for the duration of the course

Who should take this course?

This course is relevant not only to individuals who need to be able to apply the international legal frameworks to the cyber domain in their work, but also to those who are interested in acquiring a comprehensive understanding of existing international law and how it applies to engage in informed analysis and debate.

For those involved in developing government cyber security policy and practice, the course will be of strategic value. Military lawyers will be able to use the course to update their knowledge. Equally the course will be highly beneficial for those who hold governments to account, including journalists, campaigners, politicians and lawyers more generally. Academics and students will find the course highly rewarding as will those with a general interest in digital technologies and how they are being regulated.

Teachers

Dr Louise Arimatsu, LSE Visiting Senior Fellow, Centre for Women, Peace and Security 

Michael Schmitt, Professor of Public International Law at Exeter Law School. Additionally, he serves as the Charles H. Stockton Professor at the United States Naval War College and Francis Lieber Distinguished Scholar at the Lieber Institute of the United States Military Academy at West Point

Fees and administration

The standard course fee is £1970

Standard course fee: £1970 (16727A)

LSE students, alumni and staff, NGO/Charity £1500 (16727B)

and subsidised space is £985 (16727C) (by prior arrangement only)

The Centre is able to offer up to five subsidised places, at £985, in support of those who would otherwise be unable to take the course.

Subsidised places for those who would otherwise be unable to attend: Applications for subsidised places will be competitively assessed together after the deadline, and places will be awarded on the basis of merit and financial need. Find the subsidised place application form on the right of this page.            

The deadline for applying for a subsidised place is 20th January            

Priority will be given to those working in non-governmental or voluntary sector organisations who are able to demonstrate a clear benefit to that organisation beyond their personal education and professional development. 

Priority will be given to those working in non-governmental or voluntary sector organisations who are able to demonstrate a clear benefit to that organisation beyond their personal education and professional development.             

Please note that if your application for a subsidised place is not successful you will not be guaranteed a full-price place on the course as standard places are booked on a first-come first-served basis.  

Important dates

Subsidised application deadline: 20 January 2018
Subsidised space payment due: 16 February 2018
Course starts: 1 March 2018
Course ends: 2 March 2018        

Further queries

Please note that while we welcome participants from overseas, the Centre is regrettably not able to provide any additional assistance, financial or practical, in the securing of travel to, or accommodation in, London.

 

 

Subsidised application form

Your details

  • Subsidised Place Application Form
    Subsidised places are only available to those who would otherwise not be able to attend the course. Please check out the deadlines for your application. Please note that if your application for a subsidised place is not successful you will not be guaranteed a full-price place on the course as standard places are booked on a first-come first-served basis.
  • Name
  • Have you discussed the possibility of sponsorship with your employer?
  • Please do not send CVs or additional documentation as, in the interests of fairness to all applicants, only the information provided on the form, within the word limits, can be considered. Late applications will not be considered