Dr Terence McSweeney

Dr Terence McSweeney

Visiting Fellow

Department of Media and Communications

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Languages
English
Key Expertise
Film and Television Studies

About me

Dr Terence McSweeney is a Senior Lecturer at Solent University, Southampton where he teaches Film and Television Studies. He has held research posts at the University of Oxford, Queen Mary University of London, UCL and is widely recognised as one of the leading writers on contemporary American cinema. Terence is the author of The War on Terror and American Film: ‘9/11 Frames per Second’ (Edinburgh University Press, 2014) and Avengers Assemble! Critical Perspectives on the Marvel Cinematic Universe (Wallflower Press, 2018), he is the editor of American Cinema in the Shadow of 9/11 (Edinburgh University Press, 2016), co-editor of Millennial Cinema: Memory in Global Film (Wallflower Press, 2012) and Through the Black Mirror: Deconstructing the Side Effects of the Digital Age (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) with Dr Stuart Joy, which features contributions from renowned scholars such as Henry Jenkins, Sean Redmond, Steffen Hantke, M. Keith Booker and many others.

In 2020 Terence will be giving the keynote address at the conference “War Memories: 2020” at Le Mans University (24, 25, 26 June), running his own conference entitled “War, Conflict and Human Rights in Contemporary Global Film” (Southampton, 13 May 2020) and working on his monograph Blowback: The Representation of the 9/11 Wars in Global Film and Television, the first book to explore how the defining conflicts of the new millennium have been portrayed on the frames of global screens. Terence directed a documentary film as a companion piece to the book of the same name which won the award for Best Documentary Short at the Belfast Human Rights Film Festival. Until now scholarly contributions to this topic have explored the depiction of these events primarily in American film and television, but in this book Terence interrogates twenty different case studies drawn from fourteen different countries, which reveals how profoundly film and television texts have been able to not only reflect how the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been understood by the countries that produced them at the time, but also shaped how those conflicts will be remembered for the generations that follow.

Dr McSweeney will be working with Professor Chouliaraki during his time at LSE.