Dr Ben Radley

Dr Ben Radley

LSE Fellow

Department of International Development

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Languages
English, French
Key Expertise
political economy, mining, renewable energy, corporations

About me

Ben’s research centres on the political economy of the global renewable energy transition, with a regional focus on Central Africa. His work in this area revolves around two themes. First, the social, economic and environmental implications of the increased demand the transition places on the minerals and metals needed for low-carbon technologies, and which are predominantly located in resource-exporting economies of the global South. Second, and relatedly, the developmental implications of the transition’s dependence on the diffusion of green technologies from North American, European and East Asian corporations, which risks undermining rather than advancing emancipatory projects and movements in the global South. Ben is currently developing a new research project to investigate this second theme through a comparative case study of Rwanda and the DR Congo, and working on a book manuscript provisionally titled ‘Mining in the Shadows of Giants’. 

Ben has been involved in international development for 15 years, including 10 years living and working in Kenya, Burundi and the DR Congo. During this time, he has worked with and advised various ministries, multilateral agencies and NGOs, including the EU, the OECD, the ILO, DFID, GIZ, USAID and Oxfam. Alongside his academic work, he writes frequently for a range of different media outlets, including past publications for Al Jazeera, the Guardian, the Washington Post and Jeune Afrique. Ben holds a Master of Science in Development Studies from the LSE, and a PhD (cum laude) in Development Studies from the International Institute of Social Studies.

Selected publications

Peer-reviewed journal articles

Book chapters

Expertise Details

Political economy; mining; renewable energy; corporations; structural transformation; industrial policy; agrarian change; the state; labour