News

From the Department of Methodology

 
The latest updates on news, articles, events and more

 

20 January
Dr Ellie Knott becomes Associate Editor of Nationalities Papers

Nationalities Papers publishes cutting edge multidisciplinary work on nationalism, migration, diasporas, and ethnic conflict, in particular in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe, Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus, and Eurasia.

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Methods, Dr Ellie Knott, has joined the editorial team as an Associate Editor and will specialise in everyday nationalism and methodology-related pieces.

Keep up with Ellie on Twitter.

 

19 January
'Couples navigating work, care and Universal Credit' launch event announced

The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research will host the launch of a new report on couples navigating work, care and Universal Credit.

This webinar will see the launch of the final report from the ESRC-funded longitudinal qualitative research project, Couples balancing work, money and care: Exploring the shifting landscape under Universal Credit, and summarise the key findings.

Dr Kate Summers (British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Methodology) will speak at the event, along with Dr Fran Bennett, Rita Griffiths, Ryan Shorthouse and chair, Nick Pearce.

The launch event is scheduled for 26 January. More information here.

Keep up with Kate on Twitter.

18 January
Dr Ellie Knott to speak at ASN Webinar, 20 January

The Association for the Study of Nationalities has confirmed Dr Ellie Knott (Assistant Professor in the Department of Methodology) as a speaker for its virtual ASN Webinar on 20 January 2022. The topic of the webinar is 'Contested Identities and State-Making in the Post-Soviet Space'.

Fellow speakers include Dr Marharyta Fabrykant and Dr Olga Onuch. More details about the webinar can be found here.

Keep up with Ellie on Twitter.

17 January
Published experts largely agree with a call for immediate widespread increased Vitamin D intakes to combat COVID-19, suggest the latest results of project by Dr Daniele Fanelli 

Dr Daniele Fanelli (Course Tutor in the Department of Methodology) has been running an ongoing project at covidconsensus.org which aims to measure, disseminate, study and foster scientific consensus on matters of scientific and social controversy surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

The latest findings suggest that published experts predominantly agree with a call for immediate widespread increased Vitamin D intakes to combat COVID-19. Read more here.

Keep up with Daniele on Twitter.

10 January
Dr Eleanor Power and Dr Daniel Redhead are published in Royal Society special issue

The Royal Society's theme issue, ‘The centennial of the pecking order: current state and future prospects for the study of dominance hierarchies’, published online in early January 2022. The issue commemorates the centennial of dominance hierarchy research by mapping progress over the last century and charting emerging routes to new discoveries regarding this fundamental biological structure.

The issue included an article by Dr Eleanor Power (Department of Methodology, LSE) and Dr Daniel Redhead (Department of Human Behaviour, Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute): 'Social heirarchies and social networks in humans'.

Keep up with Eleanor on Twitter.

16 December
Dr Siân Brooke confirmed as Research Associate with Oxford Internet Institute

LSE Fellow Dr Siân Brooke has been appointed as a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute.

Siân's work focuses on how technologies perpetuate gendered inequality and what interventions are effective against online discrimination. She has presented at a wide variety of conferences, both computational and sociological, and has been featured in a wide range of media, including the New York Times, BBC, Marie Claire and 5 News.

Read Siân's full OII profile here.

Keep up with Siân on Twitter.

7 December 
New publications from Dr Chao-yo Cheng and Dr Ruxandra Serban

 Two LSE Fellows in the Department of Methodology have new publications.

Dr Chao-yo Cheng is published in the Japanese Journal of Political Science with his article, Poverty alleviation and state building in peripheral areas: evidence from China.

Dr Ruxandra Serban is published in the British Journal of Politics and International Relations with her article, The practice of accountability in questioning prime ministers: Comparative evidence from Australia, Canada, Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

Keep up with Chao-yo and Ruxandra on Twitter.

 

6 December
Dr Aliya Rao confirmed to speak at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research's author series next year

 The Clayman Institute for Gender Research is a division of Stanford University and hosts a series of talks celebrating the release of books by Clayman Institute scholars.

Dr Aliya Rao, Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology at LSE and former Clayman Institute postdoctoral fellow, will be featured on 16 February 2022. Her book, Crunch Time: How Married Couples Confront Unemployment, gets up close and personal with college-educated, unemployed men, women, and spouses to explain how comparable men and women have starkly different experiences of unemployment.

Find more information about the book talk here.

Keep up with Aliya on Twitter

30 November
French policy-makers reference work by Dr Marion Lieutaud and Professor Vincent Dubois

Dr Marion Lieutaud of LSE's Department of Methodology and Professor Vincent Dubois of Sciences Po Strasbourg had their article referenced in a report from the French government agency, 'Inspection of Social Affairs'. 

Dr Lieutaud and Professor Dubois' article examines the evolution of how French MPs talk about benefit fraud and the monitoring of welfare recipients over the last 40 years, finding that the topic of benefit fraud and control gradually became naturalised and common-place at the same time as the narrative grew increasingly disciplinary and criminalising.

Read the article here.

Keep up with Marion on Twitter.

29 November
Dr Siân Brooke becomes an affiliate of the LSE Data Science Institute

Dr Siân Brooke is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Methodology and now part of the Data Science Institute Affiliate Scheme.

Siân's Leverhulme research focuses on gender differences in programming and technical collaboration and was recently the focus of the DSI's data science spotlight.

Keep up with Siân on Twitter

8 November
Dr Audrey Alejandro selected for an online exhibit of 50 scholars who have contributed to theoretical debates in International Relations.

Dr Audrey Alejandro, Assistant Professor of Qualitative Text Analysis in the Department of Methodology, has been selected for an online exhibit of 50 scholars who have contributed to theoretical debates in International Relations. The exhibit is curated by the students of University Madrid Complutense.

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter

1 November 2021
Dr Daniele Fanelli invited as keynote speaker at ENRIO 2021 Congress on Research Integrity Practice

LSE Fellow Dr Daniele Fanelli was a keynote speaker at the ENRIO 2021 Congress on Research Integrity Practice.

Daniele opened the session talking about What new challenges lie ahead for research integrity officers?, and took the opportunity to illustrate how science may be challenged by some downsides of new ICTs and new online cultures.

ENRIO 2021 conference, FI, Online, 2021, keynoteWhat challenges lie ahead for research integrity officers? video recording and slides

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter

30 October 2021
Dr Edward Ademolu nominated as part of the LSE Black History Month Staff Showcase 2021

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Edward Ademolu has been featured in this year's Black History Month Staff showcase.

Edward's showcase profile offers a chance to learn more about his reflections on Black History Month and the theme Black 365. Edward comments that "The theme positively denotes a Blackness with an indefinite leave to remain, without cause to prove a meritorious claim— a rightful permanence of British settlement beyond October’s 31 days. Better yet, it suggests a certain normalcy in/of Blackness which is almost Godly in its airy omnipresence spanning across the seasons of time.".

Keep up to date with Edward on Twitter

29 October 2021
New article from Dr Audrey Alejandro published in the Journal of International Relations and Development

Assistant Professor Dr Audrey Alejandro's new article Do international relations scholars not care about Central and Eastern Europe or do they just take the region for granted? A conclusion to the special issue interrogates the representation of Central and Eastern Europe’s (CEE) in International Relations (IR), its relative absence in the worlding IR literature and assesses initiatives to provincializing IR from the region.

Audrey argues that CEE has been relatively neglected in the ‘worlding IR’ literature 1) due to local factors, 2) because it might have been turned into an ‘unimportant other’, 3) and because the history of the region challenges the macro-categories – ‘West/non-West’, ‘North/South’, ‘core/periphery’ – that structure this conversation. I show how the special issue offers promising endeavors to provincialize IR that are transferable to other contexts, for instance small states. Doing so, I use CEE as a case study to build a bridge between the special issue and the different debates it contributes to – making IR a less Eurocentric/parochial field, decentering European IR from the IR produced in UK/Scandinavian countries, and exploring the conditions of formulating critiques that produces something other than the problems they denounce.

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter

28 October 2021
Watch the Lab Talk #5 - Replication crisis - lifting the lid on reproducibility

LSE Fellow Dr Daniele Fanelli has been invited as a guest speaker to the online Lab Talk #5 - Replication crisis - lifting the lid on reproducibility organised by Clustermarket, a platform to bring people, equipment and data together all-in one lab management tool for scientists to get more research done.

In this 5th panel discussion they have discussed the replication crisis, its most common causes and threats it brings to the science world. While the replication crisis can be a commonly mentioned issue, the background and causes of it may not be clear to all. Originating in the early 2010s, the term replication crisis refers to the fact that findings of many types of scientific research are often difficult or even impossible to replicate due to one or multiple issues raising concerns about the credibility of the findings. Along with this, the accuracy of existing scientific findings as well the matter of following correct procedure may be questioned.

Watch the talk

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter

21 October 2021
Reinventadas selected for MIDBO 23 - Bogota international documentary film festival

Reinventadas is the result of a 'remote participatory video' project led by LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi. 

This project explores the realities of women living in Medellín, Colombia during the COVID-19 pandemic and uses an innovative and pioneering method of ‘remote participatory video’ utilising smartphones.

The film was directed by the women themselves in online workshops over 10 months during the pandemic.Throughout the project, they were trained on how to best use their smartphones and available technology to film and edit a documentary that discussed the impact of the pandemic on their everyday lives.

Watch it here

Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter

20 October 2021
New report from Wellcome Global Monitor: Mental Health, a new global survey into people's experiences and views on mental health and science

Professor Patrick Sturgis has been working on a new report with Wellcome, Global Monitor: Mental Health, a new global survey into people's experiences and views on mental health and science. 

The Wellcome Global Monitor: Mental Health is the world’s largest survey of how people consider and cope with anxiety and depression and explores the perceived role of science to find new solutions.

Key findings

People worldwide think mental health is important. The Wellcome Global Monitor shows 92% of people worldwide believe mental health was as important or more important than physical health across all countries.

 

They are not sure that science can help. The Wellcome Global Monitor shows more people saw science as highly relevant to being able to help address infectious diseases (53%) than anxiety and depression (31%). 

 

A combination of different approaches are used by people globally to manage their mental health. 

 

Mental Health Science must rise to this challenge together, building on the evidence of what works to find next-generation treatments, and thoroughly investigate all possible solutions.

 

View and download the full report

 

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter  

 

19 October
Dr Sonja Marzi invited at the 'Latin American Migration and Participatory Research Symposium'

LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi has been invited to take part at the 'Latin American Migration and Participatory Research Symposium' hosted by the University of Pennsylvania, Center for Latin American and Latinx Studies Centro de Cultura, Arte, Trabajo y Educación (CCATE).

This virtual symposium will build upon Latin America’s longstanding tradition with participatory and action-oriented research methods. It will explore how global partnerships that bring together university- and community-based researchers can shed new light on the push and pull factors of Latin American migration to address educational inequities in sending and receiving countries. The symposium will also provide a unique context to consider how these partnerships can create new pathways to more equitable educational outcomes at home in Latin America and in host countries across the globe.

Drawing on lessons learned from Latin America, participants will engage in interactive, dialogic sessions to expand on and create new pathways to sustained institutional partnerships with community-based researchers, including high school students, and both local and global organizations. Collectively, participants will develop a joint research agenda focused on reducing inequities in educational outcomes for global Latinx communities.

Please see the agenda here and register through this registration link

14 October 2021
Registration open for our Virtual Graduate Open Day

LSE's next Virtual Graduate Open Events will take place between 8-19 November 2021. Advance booking is required. Event times are UK local time.

Information about entry requirements, programme structure and courses and graduate destinations can be found on the LSE programme pages

The Department of Methodology will be hosting three online events:

  • Studying MSc Applied Social Data Science at LSE. Tuesday 9 November 2021, 10-11am. Book your place here
  • Studying MSc Social Research Methods at LSE. 
    Wednesday 10 November 2021, 4-5pm. Book your place here
  • PhD study in Methodology at LSE. Wednesday 10 November 2021, 11.30am-12.30pm. Book your place here

11 October 2021
New LSE online programme designed by Dr Blake Miller and Dr Milena Tsvetkova

Designed by Assistant Professor Dr Blake Miller, Assistant Professor Milena Tsvetkova and colleagues from the Department of Statistics, the LSE Data Analytics Career Accelerator aims to accelerate careers through both its subject focus and education model. 

As data volumes continue to grow exponentially, the ability to transform this information into actionable business insights is a key capability in the ‘Age of Analytics’. Demand for data analytics skills is rocketing as a result, offering career starters and established professionals alike the opportunity to align to a high-growth path valued by organisations across industries

Keep up to date with Blake on Twitter 

Keep up to date with Milena on Twitter 

6 October 2021
Two new papers from Dr Eleanor Power published in the special issue of the Royal Society Publishing that she co-edited

When does reputation lie? Dynamic feedbacks between costly signals, social capital and social prominence is a new paper from Dr Eleanor Power and co-authors.

Performing a dramatic act of religious devotion, creating an art exhibit, or releasing a new product are all examples of public acts that signal quality and contribute to building a reputation. Signalling theory predicts that these public displays can reliably reveal quality. However, data from ethnographic work in South India suggests that more prominent individuals gain more from reputation-building religious acts than more marginalized individuals. To understand this phenomenon, they extend signalling theory to include variation in people’s social prominence or social capital, first with an analytical model and then with an agent-based model. 

The second paper titled Networks of reliable reputations and cooperation: a review Reputation has been shown to provide an informal solution to the problem of cooperation in human societies. After reviewing models that connect reputations and cooperation, they address how reputation results from information exchange embedded in a social network that changes endogenously itself. Theoretical studies highlight that network topologies have different effects on the extent of cooperation, since they can foster or hinder the flow of reputational information. Subsequently, they review models and empirical studies that intend to grasp the coevolution of reputations, cooperation and social networks. They identify open questions in the literature concerning how networks affect the accuracy of reputations, the honesty of shared information and the spread of reputational information. Certain network topologies may facilitate biased beliefs and intergroup competition or in-group identity formation that could lead to high cooperation within but conflicts between different subgroups of a network. Their review covers theoretical, experimental and field studies across various disciplines that target these questions and could explain how the dynamics of interactions and reputations help or prevent the establishment and sustainability of cooperation in small- and large-scale societies.

These articles are part of the theme issue ‘The language of cooperation: reputation and honest signalling

Keep up to date with Elly on Twitter 

4 October 2021
New paper from Dr Milena Tsvetkova published in the special issue of the Royal Society Publishing co-edited by Dr Eleanor Power

The language of cooperation: reputation and honest signalling is the theme of the new special issue of the Royal Society Publishing co-edited by Assistant professor dr Eleanor Power.

Large-scale non-kin cooperation is a unique ingredient of human success. This type of cooperation is challenging to explain in a world of self-interested individuals. This theme issue promotes an interdisciplinary approach that allows to explore and to understand the evolution and the maintenance of reputation systems, with emphasis on gossip and honest signalling. The articles in this special issue draw attention to the complexities of the workings of reputation systems, asking: (i) What are the necessary conditions for reputation-based systems? (ii) What is the content and context of reputation systems? (iii) How can reputations promote cooperation? And (iv) What is the role of gossip in maintaining reputation systems and thus cooperation?

The effects of reputation on inequality in network cooperation games is the title of a new article from Assistant Professor Dr Milena Tsvetkova.

This study investigates how public and objective reputational information affects payoff inequality in repeated social dilemma interactions in large groups. Milena considers two aspects of inequality: excessive dispersion of final payoffs and diminished correspondence between final payoff and cooperative behaviour. She uses a simple heuristics-based agent model to demonstrate that reputational information does not always increase the dispersion of final payoffs in strategically updated networks, and actually decreases it in randomly rewired networks. More importantly, reputational information almost always improves the correspondence between final payoffs and cooperative behaviour. She analyses empirical data from nine experiments of the repeated Trust, Helping, Prisoner's Dilemma and Public Good games in networks of ten or more individuals to provide partial support for the predictions. The research suggests that reputational information not only improves cooperation but may also reduce inequality.

Keep up to date with Elly on Twitter 

Keep up to date with Milena on Twitter

1 October 2021
New open access article from Dr Aliya Rao

Assistant Professor Dr Aliya Rao's new article titled 'Gendered Interpretations of Job Loss and Subsequent Professional Pathways' is now available open access on Gender and Society, the official journal of Sociologists for Women in Society.

While we know that career interruptions shape men’s and women’s professional trajectories, we know less about how job loss may matter for this process. Drawing on interviews with unemployed, college-educated men and women in professional occupations, I show that while both men and women interpret their job loss as due to impersonal “business” decisions, women additionally attribute their job loss as arising from employers’ “personal” decisions. Men’s job loss shapes their subsequent preferred professional pathways, but never in a way that diminishes the importance of their participation in the labor force. For some women in this study, job loss becomes a moment to reflect on their professional pathways, often pulling them back from paid work. This study identifies job loss as an event that, on top of gendered workplace experiences and caregiving obligations, may curtail some women’s participation in paid work.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter

30 September 2021
New paper from Noam Titelman and Ben Lauderdale

Would you be able to guess how other people voted? The answer is not so simple is the new paper from our PhD candidate Noam Titelman and Visiting Professor Ben Lauderdale.

They report results from two experiments where subjects were provided with randomly selected demographic profiles of voters and were asked to assess either which party that individual was likely to have voted for in the 2017 election or whether they were likely to have voted Leave or Remain in the 2016 referendum. They find that, despite substantial overconfidence in individual responses, on average citizens’ guesses broadly reflect the actual distribution of groups supporting the parties and referendum positions.

Keep up to date with Noam on Twitter

Keep up to date with Ben on Twitter

28 September 2021
Dr Kate Summers to speak at 'Stick or Shift? Attitudes towards inequality, the Welfare State and social security benefits during COVID-19'

LSE Fellow Dr Kate Summers has organised and will be speaking at an event on Thursday, 7 October 2021.

Stick or Shift? Attitudes towards inequality, the Welfare State and social security benefits during COVID-19 paints a more detailed picture of what has happened to attitudes and why. Covering attitudes towards the welfare state, inequality and social security benefits they ask what has happened to attitudes, why this might be, and what this means for policy formation and change.

This online event is free and open to all, please register here

Keep up to date with Kate on Twitter

27 September 2021
Dr Aliya Rao to speak at the Stanford University's VMware Women's LeadershipInnovation Lab

Assistant Professor Dr Aliya Rao will be presenting at the Stanford University's VMware Women's LeadershipInnovation Lab on Wednesday, 6 October 2021.

The VMware Women's Leadership Innovation Lab at Stanford University generates foundational research to advance women's leadership by diagnosing barriers, developing and evaluating interventions to get beyond barriers, and disseminates research-based solutions by bridging the gap between research and practice.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter

20 September 2021
New publication from Dr Sonja Marzi

Participatory video from a distance: co-producing knowledge during the COVID-19 pandemic using smartphones is the new paper from LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi. 

In this paper, Sonja outlines an innovative remote participatory video (PV) methodology that makes use of participants’ smartphones. It was developed as an alternative to co-production research and can be employed when face-to-face contact is impossible or undesirable. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, face-to-face research interactions have been disrupted or become impossible. Yet it is vital to reach those who are most affected by emergencies and to include their voices. The research reported here was a collaboration between women in Medellín, Colombia, and a team of filmmakers and researchers. They developed an innovative remote PV methodology using participants’ smartphones, researching how women from poorer neighbourhoods were affected by the pandemic in their everyday lives. Here, she reflects on the strengths and weaknesses of the remote PV methodology, arguing that it offers new avenues for participants to take control of the filming and editing process, and builds technical skills and capacities that have value beyond the timeframe of the project.SheI concludes that the remote PV method has great potential as a stand-alone method, moving the landscape of co-production research away from a requirement for geographical co-presence and potentially shifting power and ownership towards local co-researchers and participants.

 Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter

17 September 2021
Dr Alasdair Jones begins a new research project

Associate Professor Dr Alasdair Jones and Dr Andri Ottesen will begin work on the project Breaking the Internal Combustion Engine Reign: A Mixed-Methods Study of Attitudes Towards Using and Purchasing Electric Vehicles in Kuwait.

The research project addresses a broad gap in electric vehicles (EV) research in settings like Kuwait, namely a lack of attitudinal and customer preference research into perceptions of EVs. Research into the technical and infrastructural dimensions of EV-adoption in GCC countries is well underway, including research funded by KFAS and KISR in Kuwait. Much less well understood, however, are social attitudes towards EVs and EV-use in Kuwait, and how best to market EVs there once those attitudes are better understood. In addition, the research fills two smaller gaps in the existing research into attitudes towards EV-adoption in the Middle East. First, existing studies rely on survey data, but fail to explore the attitudes reported in surveys in more depth using qualitative data. Second, these same studies also concern prospective EV owners only, and fail to include the perspectives of early adopters.

16 September 2021
Read a new blog from Dr Kate Summers 

LSE Fellow Dr Kate Summers is the author of a new blog 'Did COVID-19 transform our attitudes to welfare?' published by YouGov.

This is part of the 'Welfare at a social distance' research project summarising some of their recent work on what's happened to attitudes towards benefits during the pandemic. They found that COVID-19 prompted little change in public welfare attitudes. Attitudes did become less anti-welfare during the first wave of the pandemic, only to rebound quickly in the summer of 2020. The second COVID wave prompted another small fall in anti-welfare attitudes. However, this appears unlikely to have endured.

The best way to test this comes from YouGov’s welfare policy trackers (part of the wider YouGov trackers series). These trackers provide comparable data on public attitudes at regular intervals throughout the pandemic.

Keep up to date with Kate on Twitter

15 September 2021
New open access paper from Professor Jon Jackson 

Professor Jon Jackson and co-authors Ben Bradford, Julia Yesberg, and Zoe Hobson have a new open access paper 'Artificial fairness? Trust in algorithmic police decision-making' published in the Journal of Experimental Criminology (2021).

An online experiment tested whether different decision-making methods, outcomes and scenario types affect judgements about the appropriateness and fairness of decision-making and the general acceptability of police use of this particular technology. People see a decision as less fair and less appropriate when an algorithm decides, compared to when an officer decides. Yet, perceptions of fairness and appropriateness were strong predictors of support for police use of algorithms, and being exposed to a successful use of an algorithm was linked, via trust in the decision made, to greater support for police use of algorithms.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter

10 September 2021
Dr Aliya Rao invited to speak at Trinity College Dublin 

Assistant Professor Dr Aliya Rao will be presenting a seminar as part of Trinity College Dublin's Sociology Department Research Seminar Series.

Aliya's seminar 'Crunch time: How married couples confont unemployment' will take place 15 September. 

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter

8 September 2021
Professor Jon Jackson invited to give talk on legitimacy from a psychology and law perspective

Professor Jon Jackson will be giving a talk 'Legitimacy: A psychology and law perspective' at the Centre for Research on Discretion and Paternalism on 9 September as part of the Centre's RDV seminar series. 

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter

6 September 2021
Read a new article from Professor Patrick Sturgis

Along with co-authors Olga MaslovskayaGabriele Durrant and Ian Brunton-Smith, Professor Patrick Sturgis has a new article 'The Interviewer Contribution to Variability in Response Times in Face-to-Face Interview Surveys' published in Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology. 

Survey researchers have consistently found that interviewers make a small but systematic contribution to variability in response times. However, we know little about what the characteristics of interviewers are that lead to this effect. In this study, we address this gap in understanding by linking item-level response times from wave 3 of the UK Household Longitudinal Survey (UKHLS) to data from an independently conducted survey of interviewers. The linked data file contains over three million records and has a complex, hierarchical structure with response latencies nested within respondents and questions, which are themselves nested within interviewers and areas. We propose the use of a cross-classified mixed-effects location scale model to allow for the decomposition of the joint effects on response times of interviewers, areas, questions, and respondents. We evaluate how interviewer demographic characteristics, personality, and attitudes to surveys and to interviewing affect the length of response latencies and present a new method for producing interviewer-specific intra-class correlations of response times. Hence, the study makes both methodological and substantive contributions to the investigation of response times.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter

5 September 2021
Listen to a thought-provoking podcast featuring Dr Flora Cornish

Associate Professor in Research Methodology Dr Flora Cornish features in the Making Contact podcast 'The Response: The Fight for Justice After the Grenfell Tower Fire'. The fire was the United Kingdom’s deadliest disaster since World War II and this podcast examines the events that led up to the Grenfell Tower fire, looking at how the community has responded through the voices of survivors, their families, and others who were impacted.

Flora's current research investigates the process of community-led recovery in West London in the aftermath of the Grenfell Tower fire. 

Keep up to date with Flora on Twitter

4 September 2021
Professor Jon Jackson begins new project 

Funded by the Nuffield Foundation, Jon Jackson and colleagues Naomi Creutzfeldt, Ben Bradford, Arabella Kyprianides and Heidi Bancroft will begin work on the project 'The court reform programme and the response to the pandemic'.

This project will be examining the administrative justice system and the impact of COVID-19.

The pandemic forced the justice system, where possible, to go digital. This rapid and radical shift presents a huge opportunity to draw positive lessons for the future. 

The research team will be examining the effect of rapid digitalisation on the delivery of justice, identifying the effects on access for marginalised groups and exploring how trust can be built and sustained in parts of the justice system affected by the pandemic. This will be done by partnering with housing, special education needs and disability organisations. These are areas of law which are exceedingly important during a pandemic and serve as an excellent platform to explore trust and access to justice.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter 

3 September 2021
Read a new paper co-authored by Dr Joshua Townsley

LSE Fellow in Quantitative Methodology Dr Joshua Townsley has a new paper out today with co-authors Stuart Turnbull-Dugarte, Siim Trumm and Caitlin Milazzo. Published in Parliamentary Affairs, the paper is titled 'Who Vote by Post? Understanding the Drivers of Postal Voting in the 2019 British General Election'

While most voters in democratic countries still cast their ballot on election day, the proportion of the electorate which opts for postal voting has been steadily, and often dramatically, increasing. This transformation in electoral politics, however, is under-researched, particularly with regards to the motivations underlying the decision to cast a postal vote. In this article, the authors analyse the factors that drive an individual to vote by post rather than at the polling station using data from the 2019 British Election Study.

Keep up to date with Joshua on Twitter 

2 September 2021
Dr Flora Cornish and Dr Sonja Marzi hosting a session at the RGS-IBG Conference

Associate Professor Dr Flora Cornish and LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi have been invited to host the the invited speaker session 'Un-bordering ‘knowledge exchange and impact’; Reinvigorating participatory methodologies of scholar-activism' as part of RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2021. The session will discuss, question and challenge the status quo and future of participatory research and methodologies and scholar activism. 

1 September 2021
Welcome to Dr Patrick Gildersleve and Dr Jonathan Cardosa-Silva

The Department of Methodology welcomes two new members of staff today. Dr Patrick Gildersleve joins as LSE Fellow in Computational Science. He has recently completed a PhD at the Oxford Internet Institute where he held a number of supplementary research and teaching roles. 

Dr Jonathan Cardosa-Silva joins as a Research Officer in the Department of Methodology and the Data Science Institute. Prior to joining us, Jonathan led several data science projects (forecasting, regression, classification and clustering of static and temporal structured data as well as text documents) at a Brazilian data science consultancy startup.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter

Keep up to date with Jonathan on Twitter

31 August 2021
New paper from Professor Patrick Sturgis

Professor Patrick Sturgis and co-authors Emma Gorman and Franz Buscha have a new open access paper 'Spatial and social mobility in England and Wales: A sub-national analysis of differences and trends over time' published today in the British Journal of Sociology.

Using ONS Longitudinal Study data, the paper looks at sub-national trends in social mobility in England and Wales. Recent studies of social mobility have documented that not only who your parents are, but also where you grow up, substantially influences subsequent life chances. The paper brings these two concepts together to study social mobility in England and Wales, in three post-war generations, using linked Decennial Census data. The findings show considerable spatial variation in rates of absolute and relative mobility, as well as how these have changed over time. While upward mobility increased in every region between the mid-1950s and the early 1980s, this shift varied across different regions and tailed off for more recent cohorts. Also explored is how domestic migration is related to social mobility, finding that those who moved out of their region of origin had higher rates of upward mobility compared to those who stayed, although this difference narrowed over time.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter

30 August 2021
Dr Alasdair Jones invited to speak at Co-designing Publics symposium

Associate Professor Dr Alasdair Jones will be speaking at the Co-designing Publics symposium taking place 16 - 17 September. 

The symposium will bring together the Co-Designing Publics Research Network team, project partners and special guest speakers to discuss emerging themes for research and practice on co-designing publics.

29 August 2021
Dr Audrey Alejandro invited to be part of the panel at ECPR 2021

Assistant Professor Dr Audrey Alejandro will be part of the panel discussing International Organisations through a Discursive Lens: Challenges, Contributions and Emerging Issues at the ECPR 2021 virtual conference taking place 31 August - 3 September. 

In addition, Audrey will be presenting the paper 'From evidence-based knowledge to technicisation: the controversial medicalisation of male genital cutting by global health IOs' as part of the discussion panel Knowledge in International Organizations on 2 September.  

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter

28 August 2021
Dr Kate Summers to speak at report launch of Solidarity in Crisis? Trends in attitudes during COVID-19

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Kate Summers will be speaking at the report launch Solidarity in Crisis? Trends in attitudes during COVID-19 on 2 September. 

How has the pandemic affected public opinion on welfare benefits? There were good reasons to think COVID-19 would increase the public’s appetite for social security. The last year and a half has been a time of solidarity in the face of a collective crisis; large numbers of people became unemployed for a manifestly ‘good’ reason; media coverage of welfare has become dramatically more positive; and more and more people have had direct experience of the benefits system. And yet, the limited evidence collected so far suggests that attitudes have not changed.

Using new nationally representative survey data, alongside many in-depth interviews with claimants themselves, the report will show how attitudes have changed, and how they have stayed the same. Based on our findings, we will ask: how can we frame a better social security system that is grounded in public support?

The report is part of Welfare at a (Social) Distance, a major national research project funded by the ESRC as part of the UK Research and Innovation's rapid response to COVID-19. 

Keep up to date with Kate on Twitter

27 August 2021 
Read a new open access article from Dr Siân Brooke

LSE Fellow in Computational Science Dr Siân Brooke has a new article today titled Trouble in programmer’s paradise: gender-biases in sharing and recognising technical knowledge on Stack Overflow published in Information Communication and Society.

In the article, Siân conducts a computational nonbinary analysis of gender on the world’s largest programming forum, Stack Overflow.This is based on 11-years of activity, across levels of expertise, language, and specialism, to assess if Stack Overflow is hostile to women & feminine users.

Keep up to date with Siân on Twitter

25 August 2021
Join Dr Rishita Nandagiri at the BSPS online conference

ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Rishita Nandagiri has been invited to chair the session 'Qualitative demographic research: Challenging paradigms' at the BSPS online conference taking place 14 - 15 September 2021.

Keep up to date with Rishita on Twitter

24 August 2021 
New open access article from Dr Eleanor Power

Co-authored with Professor Nichola Raihani, the article No good deed goes unpunished: the social costs of prosocial behaviour is published today in Evolutionary Human Sciences.

Performing costly helpful behaviours can allow individuals to improve their reputation. Those who gain a good reputation are often preferred as interaction partners and are consequently better able to access support through cooperative relationships with others. However, investing in prosocial displays can sometimes yield social costs: excessively generous individuals risk losing their good reputation, and even being vilified, ostracised or antisocially punished. As a consequence, people frequently try to downplay their prosocial actions or hide them from others. The review explores when and why investments in prosocial behaviour are likely to yield social costs.

Keep up to date with Eleanor on Twitter

20 August 2021
New article from Dr Sonja Marzi

LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi's new article 'Participatory video from a distance: co-producing knowledge during the COVID-19 pandemic using smartphones' is published today in Qualitative Research.

The article outlines an innovative remote participatory video (PV) methodology that makes use of participants’ smartphones. It was developed as an alternative to co-production research and can be employed when face-to-face contact is impossible or undesirable. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, face-to-face research interactions have been disrupted or become impossible. Yet it is vital to reach those who are most affected by emergencies and to include their voices. The research reported here was a collaboration between women in Medellín, Colombia, and a team of filmmakers and researchers.

Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter

18 August 2021
Read Dr Siân Brooke's thoughts on gender and trolling

LSE Fellow in Computational Social Science Dr Siân Brooke was invited to contribute and talk about gender and online trolling in Screenshot magazine.

Read the full article 'Why do men troll? Unpacking the psychology of internet trolling'.

Keep up to date with Siân on Twitter.

17 August 2021
New working paper from Professor Patrick Sturgis

Professor Patrick Sturgis has a new working paper 'Selective Schooling Has Not Promoted Social Mobility in England' out today. 

Co-authored with Emma Gorman and Franz Buscha, the paper links estimates of absolute and relative mobility from the census to the extent of selecting schooling in Local Education Authorities for children born between 1956 and 1972.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter.

16 August 2021
New open access article from Dr Sonja Marzi

LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi's new article 'Having money is not the essential thing...but...it gets everything moving' is published today in Sociologial Research Online. 

Drawing upon insights from fieldwork, Sonja extends the discussion of aspirations as a conceptual tool by exploring how young Colombians plan to pursue them and by seeking to understand their aspirations as a way of navigating towards what they see as a good life. 

Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter

11 August 2021
STICERD grant awarded to Dr Siân Brooke, Martin Lukac and Dr Aliyah Rao

Congratulations to Dr Siân Brooke, Martin Lukac and Dr Aliyah Rao who have been awarded a STICERD grant for their research project "Equity in Freelancing: Interventions in Intersectional Discrimination on Online Labour Markets".

9 August 2021
Professor Jon Jackson awarded Nuffield Foundation grant

Professor Jon Jackson will be working on a new 18 month study looking at the effect of rapid digitalization on the delivery of justice in the areas of housing and special educational needs and disability.

Funded by the Nuffield Foundation and led by Professor Naomi Creutzfeldt at the University of Westminster, this study examines the effect of rapid digitalization on the delivery of justice in the areas of housing and special educational needs and disability. Covid-19 has forced the justice system, where possible, to go digital at a rapid pace. By empirically understanding areas that work well and those that need improvement, there is a huge opportunity to draw positive (potentially radical) lessons from this crisis. What lessons about digitalization and pathways to justice can be learned? How can trust in justice – the belief that justice system is fair, effective and open to all – be maintained? We seek to (1) better understand the effect of rapid digitalization on the advice and redress systems as well as its users; (2) identify the effects on access for marginalized groups; and (3) explore how trust can be built and sustained in two specific parts of a justice system affected by the pandemic.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter

7 August 2021
Dr Chana Teeger presents paper at 116th ASA Virtual Annual Meeting

Assistant Professor Dr Chana Teeger presented a paper titled '(Not) Feeling the Past: Boredom as a Racialized Notion' as part of the American Sociological Association VAM session on Emotions and Inequality. 

The session featured papers on strain, inauthenticity, & violence, connective labor in care-work, transcendent empathy path mapping, and the visceral economy as well as Chana's paper on boredom as a racialized notion.

Keep up to date with Chana on Twitter 

5 August 2021
Read a new Sociology Compass review article from Dr Aliya Rao on white-collar unemployment and job-searching in the US

Assistant Professor Dr Aliya Rao's new article titled 'Experiences of white-collar job loss and job-searching in the United States' is now published on the online-only journal Sociology Compass.

This review article focuses on the meaning and experience of contemporary white-collar unemployment in the United States. After explaining the empirical and theoretical rationales for the focus on white-collar workers, this review delves into three aspects of white-collar unemployment: who loses jobs; what unemployment means for one's sense of self, marital relationships, parent-child relationships; and how the process of job-searching and re-employment unfold for unemployed white-collar workers in the US. Throughout, Aliya take an intersectional approach, identifying how sensitivity to structural location in the labor market and the family can augment our sociological understandings of these important issues and she close by suggesting directions for future research.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

26 July 2021
Professor Jouni Kuha elected as Fellow to the British Academy

Congratulations to Professor Jouni Kuha who is one of 84 new British Academy Fellows elected in recognition of their outstanding contributions to the SHAPE subjects - the social sciences, humanities and the arts. 

Welcoming the Fellows, the new President of the British Academy, Professor Julia Black FBA, said:

“As the new President of the British Academy, it gives me great pleasure to welcome this new cohort of Fellows, who are as impressive as ever and remind us of the rich and diverse scholarship and research undertaken within the SHAPE disciplines – the social sciences, humanities and the arts. I am very much looking forward to working with them on our shared interests.

“The need for SHAPE subjects has never been greater. As Britain recovers from the pandemic and seeks to build back better, the insights from our diverse disciplines will be vital to ensure the health, wellbeing and prosperity of the UK and will continue to provide the cultural and societal enrichment that has sustained us over the last eighteen months. Our new Fellows embody the value of their subjects and I congratulate them warmly for their achievement.”

23 July 2021
LSE Fellow Dr Kate Summers awarded British Academy post-doctoral fellowship

Congratulations to Dr Kate Summers who has been awarded a 36 month British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship to undertake research on social security policy in a (post) pandemic world. 

The research has two interrelated aims: (1) to develop and deploy new methodological tools fit for the (post) pandemic era, targeting current methodological blind-spots, omissions and exclusions, and (2) to produce new substantive insights on the (dis)functioning of the working-age social security system in this context. The research will produce rigorous, policy-relevant evidence on how the social security system has fared in supporting key groups, and at the same time share new approaches to qualitative data collection that can be used by other researchers.

Keep up to date with Kate on Twitter 

22 July 2021
New chapter from Dr Alasdair Jones

 Dr Alasdair Jones has co-authored a new chapter with Meg Bartholomew entitled 'Ties through place: socio-material network analyses in urban studies'. 

The chapter appears in the Edward Elgar Handbook of Cities and Networks.

21 July 2021
New working paper from Professor Patrick Sturgis

Professor Patrick Sturgis and colleagues at CEPEO UCL have published a working paper 'Inequalities in young peoples’ education experiences and wellbeing during the Covid-19 pandemic'.

Using data from a nationally representative survey of 4,000 young people linked to their education records, the paper considers inequalities in young people’s experiences of lockdown, returning to school, exam cancellations, wellbeing, and future plans.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter

19 July 2021
New open access paper out in the Journal of Accountability in Research

LSE Fellow Dr Daniele Fanelli offers an estimate of retractions' epistemic costs in this new paper 'What difference might retractions make? An estimate of the potential epistemic cost of retractions on meta-analyses' published in the Journal of Accountability in Research.

Daniele collected a sample of 229 meta-analyses published between 2013 and 2016 that had cited a retracted study, assessed whether this study was included in the meta-analytic estimate and, if so, re-calculated the summary effect size without it. The majority (68% of N = 229) of retractions had occurred at least one year prior to the publication of the citing meta-analysis. In 53% of these avoidable citations, the retracted study was cited as a candidate for inclusion, and only in 34% of these meta-analyses (13% of total) the study was explicitly excluded because it had been retracted. Meta-analyses that included retracted studies were published in journals with significantly lower impact factor. Summary estimates without the retracted study were lower than the original if the retraction was due to issues with data or results and higher otherwise, but the effect was small. We conclude that meta-analyses have a problematically high probability of citing retracted articles and of including them in their pooled summaries, but the overall epistemic cost is contained.

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter.

16 July 2021
Watch the first department's film "What's the Department of Methodology"

The Department of Methodology is delighted and proud to announce its very first film funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact (KEI).

KEI supports anyone conducting or supporting research at LSE and interested in engaging beyond the School to enhance its contribution to society. 

Watch the film here.

14 July 2021
Dr Alasdair Jones convening two sessions on qualitative methods for understanding place-based urban communities at the RC21 conference 

Associate Professor Dr Alasdair Jones will be convening two sessions on qualitative methods for understanding place-based urban communities at the RC21 conference on Thursday 15 July 14:00-17:15 CEST.

The general theme of the conference is ‘Sensing and Shaping the City, focusing on how citizens experience the fragmentary, unequal and contradictory realities of global urbanity.

Alasdair and Dr Zachary Neal – Department of Psychology, Michigan State University will present two papers on ‘Methods for understanding place-based urban communities as embodied experience and practice'. They are interested in papers that adopt mixed-methods approaches as a means to explore place-based (sense of) community as a phenomenon characterised by ‘double-embeddedness’ whereby social relationships are understood to be “embedded in a local structure of other relationships, in turn embedded in geographic space” (Habinek, Martin and Zablocki 2015: 27). These approaches might combine social network-based measures of community with more spatial (network, mapping, urban design or otherwise) analyses, but they might also employ other (e.g. sensory, mobile, participatory or artistic) methods to as a means to capture the embodied experience of urban community as a socio-material phenomenon.

12 July 2021
Department of Methodology recognised at the LSE Excellence in Education Awards

The Department of Methodology is very proud that so many members of our Department have been recognised in the LSE Excellence in Education Awards.

Edward Ademolu, Audrey Alejandro, Flora Cornish, Daniele Fanelli, Friedrich Geiecke, Anna Izdebska, Ellie Knott, Martin Lukac, Camilya Maleh, Blake Miller, Eleanor Power, Aliya Rao, Ruxandra Serban, Patrick Sturgis, Caroline Thurtle, Milena Tsvetkova, and Ellen Watts are the winners from 2021.

Excellence in Education Awards are made on the recommendation of Heads of Department to staff who have demonstrated outstanding teaching contribution and educational leadership in their departments. These awards are designed to support the School’s aspiration of creating ‘a culture where excellence in teaching is valued and rewarded on a level with excellence in research’.

Congratulations to all of our winners! Find our more about each of them here.

29 June 2021
New open access article by Dr Edward Ademolu

LSE Fellow Dr Edward Ademolu's new open access article titled A pictured Africa: drawing as a visual qualitative research methodology for examining British African Diaspora imaginings of their ancestral ‘home’ is out today on the Visual Studies journal. 

This article examines the usefulness of participant-produced drawings as a participatory and non-mechanical visual research methodology in qualitative research with UK-based African Diaspora communities. Because of its co-construction and mediation of situated knowledgies, adaptability and with linguistic proficiency a non-prerequisite skill for drawing literacy; participatory drawings are considered particularly productive and ethically sound for work with children, young people and in the case of this research, adults, in different social and cultural contexts. Thematic and critical discourse analyses of drawings, supplemented by textual/written information and subsequent discussions about these visual productions, have the powerful potential to unearth complex (and seemingly hidden) subtleties of thought, memories, sentiments and information for (and by) participants, in ways that are illustrative, self-empowering, and individualised. As a review of drawing methodology, as a visual qualitative research method, the author discusses its usefulness and limitations, using his work with African Diaspora communities for/as context.

Keep up to date with Edward on Twitter.

28 June 2021
Dr Sonja Marzi presenting at the LSE Research Showcase Summer Series

LSE Fellow Dr Sonja Marzi has been invited at the LSE Research Showcase Summer Series on Tuesday 13 July.

This is a free event for the LSE community – Drop in online coffee-break series over the summer to hear about some of the fascinating research from our academic community. LSE staff, (current and prospective) students and alumni can register for the Zoom sessions.

Sonja will presents how she adapted her research in Colombia during the COVID-19 pandemic by using smartphones for an innovative remote participatory video methodology. The research was a collaboration between women in Medellin, Colombia, and a team of UK and Colombia based film makers and researchers. Doing participatory video online and with digital tools they were able to collaboratively research how women from disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Medellin are affected by the pandemic in their everyday lives and produce a 32 minutes long documentary. She will explain the process of the research and share some of the videos and women’s experiences from their perspectives.

Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter.

25 June 2021
Dr Chao-yo Cheng elected Asia Fellow by the American Political Science Association

LSE Fellow Dr Chao-yo Cheng has been selected as an Asia Fellow for the workshop “Evolution and Challenges in Local Governance in Asia” organised by the American Political Science Association

The workshop will bring together up to 12 scholars to advance research related to local governance and decentralization across Asia. This program is part of a multi-year effort to support political science research among early-career scholars in East and Southeast Asia, and to strengthen research networks linking Asian scholars with their colleagues overseas.

Leading the workshop will be Maria Ela Atienza (University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines), Allen Hicken (University of Michigan, USA), Yuko Kasuya (Keio University, Japan), and Sarah Shair-Rosenfield (University of Essex, UK). 

Keep up to date with Chao-yo on Twitter.

24 June 2021 
Department of Methodology recognised at the LSE Class Teacher Awards

The Department of Methodology is very proud to have been recognised at the LSE Class Teacher Awards.

These awards are organised by the Eden Centre and recognise Graduate Teaching Assistants, Teaching Fellows and Guest Teachers for their very special contribution to LSE teaching.

We would like to congratulate Marnie Howlett and Poorvi Iyer for winning and all of those who were Highly Commended: Edward Ademolu, Sian Brooke, Daniele Fanelli, Martin Lukac, Ruxandra Serban, Kate Summers, Joshua Townsley, Ellen Watts. 

We are proud and privileged to work alongside each of these colleagues!

21 June 2021
Dr Nimesh Dhungana invited to a webinar hosted by Cogitatio Press

LSE Fellow Nimesh Dhungana has been invited to speak at a webinar hosted by Cogitatio Press on 24 June. 

The webinar 'Disaster Risk Governance: Where Are We Headed?' will analyse the main findings of the issue "The Politics of Disaster Governance", published in the journal Politics and Governance.

Register here.

Keep up to date with Nimesh on Twitter.

19 June 2021
Read a new blog post by Dr Edward Ademolu

LSE Fellow Dr Edward Ademolu's new blog titled 'An outward sign of an inward grace: how African diaspora religious identities shape their understandings of and engagement in international development' has been published by the Identities Journal.

Edward argues that broader understandings of development that are informed by religion and faith subjectivities are not often considered, especially for African diaspora communities engaged in international and local forms of development. Addressing this gulf in knowledge has important implications for the scholarly and programmatic application of development and attendant policy recommendations. This is especially true when recognising African diaspora identities as critical for engendering particular forms of cooperation and alliance with religious members of these communities. So too, how and to what extent their religious orientations shape and determine their different priorities, strategies and traditions of ‘help’ and ‘giving’ in and for their countries and communities of heritage.

As such, are we to assume that religion(s) and faith identifications are inconsequential or secondary to how diasporas participate in and negotiate understandings of international development? Or are they much more significant and constitutive than we think? Is there space for religiously informed interpretations of international development that move beyond its definitional and operational preoccupation with technocratic rationality to allow for new and extended conceptual possibilities? All these speculative questions and theoretical possibilities constitute the intellectual space within which Edward's article: '"An outward sign of an inward grace": how African diaspora religious identities shape their understandings of and engagement in international development’, is concerned.

Keep up to date with Edward on Twitter.

18 June 2021
Watch the final in 'How to Reform the Police Series' chaired by Professor Jon Jackson 

The video of the final in 'How to Reform the Police Series' can be accessed on the How to Reform the Police project's new Youtube channel.

Chaired by Head of Department Professor Jon Jackson with Dr Alice Hills (Visiting Professor, University of Leeds), Dr Andrew Faull (Senior Researcher at the Institute for Security Studies) and Tim Heath (Security Sector Adviser, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office). The panel also featured Dr Liam O’Shea (Dinam Fellow, London School of Economics) and Dr Zoha Waseem (Research Fellow, Institute of Global City Policing, UCL).

The series was co-organised by Dr Zoha Waseem, with support from the Urban Violence Research Network, and preceded by a panel discussion convened jointly by LSE IDEAS, the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group and the UVRN.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter.

15 June 2021
Dr Nimesh Dhungana and Dr Flora Cornish's new research project has been awarded funding by Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity via the Atlantic Equity Challenge (AEQ)

"Demanding a ‘just recovery’ from below: the role of grassroots accountability activism in safeguarding labour migrants’ rights in the pandemic era" is the new research project by LSE Fellow Dr Nimesh Dhungana, Associate Professor Dr Flora Cornish, Narayan Adhikari Co-Founder and South Asia Director, Accountability Lab, Nepal, and Kripa Basnyat Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity and gender, rights and policy expert, Nepal.

They have been awarded funding by Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity via the Atlantic Equity Challenge (AEQ) as their project met the AEQ brief of bringing researchers and practitioners together to undertake innovative, solutions-oriented research and thinking directed at fundamental questions relating to global inequalities. 

The study is built on Dr Dhungana’s ongoing partnership with the Nepal-based civil society organisation, Accountability Lab (AL). A youth-based and technology-enabled organisation, its mission is to create alternative avenues of participation and accountability in order to tackle Nepal’s governance deficit. 

In the wake of the pandemic, AL launched a Coronavirus Civic Acts Campaign (CCC), with the aim of helping to document and alleviate the disadvantages facing returnee migrants and other marginalised communities. Much of this activism is centred on promoting the right to information, combating misinformation and rumours, and creating participatory avenues at the local level. 

This study will draw on “realist evaluation” methodology to examine the critical assumptions and aims underpinning the AL’s ongoing CCC campaign. It will investigate not just “what worked” under CCC, but what worked for whom, under what conditions, and how. This methodology is expected to contribute to robust empirical understandings of the theory of change” that informed the campaign and an improved theoretical understanding of the functioning of focused civil society activism in the wake of a major social upheaval.

Keep up to date with Nimesh on Twitter.

Keep up to date with Flora on Twitter.

10 June 2021
Dr Daniele Fanelli commented on Nature Index on an article about academic productivity and age

LSE Fellow Dr Daniele Fanelli has been invited by Nature Index to contribute and talk about academic productivity and age.

Daniele suggests that productivity should be measured fractionally to make assessments fair. Read the full article: 'Researchers’ publication rates don’t decline as they age'.

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter.

9 June 2021
New research from Professor Patrick Sturgis on the impact of the pandemic on young people

New evidence from a UKRI-funded survey "The ‘graduate parent’ advantage in teacher assessed grades" carried out by Professor Patrick Sturgis and colleagues of UCL Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities (CEPEO)  finds that pupils with more educated parents received an unfair advantage in their A-level results last year, with potential repercussions for equality and social mobility. 

The survey provides representative data on over 4000 young people in England aged between 13 and 20, with interviews carried out online between November 2020 and January 2021. The survey of students found that even after adjusting for previous results and social background, those from graduate households were 15% more likely to get a better grade from their teachers than from the process using an algorithm created by Ofqual, the exam regulator for England.

Read the new blog post by LSE School of Public Policy. The Guardian also reports on this survey.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter.

8 June 2021
New open access paper out in the Spanish Journal of Sociological Research

PhD student Oriol Bosch-Jover's new open access paper funded by the European Social Survey titled 'The Quality of Survey Questions in Spain: A Cross-National Comparison' is out in the Spanish Journal of Sociological Research.

Oriol and his co-author Melanie Revilla from the Research and Expertise Centre for Survey Methodology (RECSM) call attention to the importance of taking into account differences in measurement quality when conducting cross-national research. By using a Split-Ballot Multitrait-Multimethod experiment conducted in the European Social Survey round 8, they have compared the quality of questions in Spain with their quality in other participating countries and found that the average measurement quality in Spain is higher than the overall average for all ESS countries. In addition, when comparing Spain with other countries, substantive conclusions can be incorrect if differences in the size of measurement errors are not taken into account.

Keep up to date with Oriol on Twitter.

2 June 2021
Watch the trailer of the film Reinventadas 

Reinventadas is the result of a 'remote participatory video' project led by Dr Sonja Marzi. 

This project explores the realities of women living in Medellín, Colombia during the COVID-19 pandemic and uses an innovative and pioneering method of ‘remote participatory video’ utilising smartphones.

The film was directed by the women themselves in online workshops over 10 months during the pandemic.Throughout the project, they were trained on how to best use their smartphones and available technology to film and edit a documentary that discussed the impact of the pandemic on their everyday lives. 

Keep up to date with Sonja on Twitter.

28 May 2021
New open access paper out in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology

Professor Patrick Sturgis, Professor Jon Jackson, PhD student Thiago R. Oliveira, Dr Krisztián Pósch, Professor Ian Brunton-Smith, and Professor Ben Bradford's new open access paper titled 'Police Legitimacy and the Norm to Cooperate: Using a Mixed Effects Location-Scale Model to Estimate the Strength of Social Norms at a Small Spatial Scale' is out in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology.

They test whether cooperation with the police can be modelled as a place-based norm that varies in strength from one neighbourhood to the next. Estimate whether perceived police legitimacy predicts an individual’s willingness to cooperate in weak-norm neighbourhoods, but not in strong-norm neighbourhoods where most people are either willing or unwilling to cooperate, irrespective of their perceptions of police legitimacy.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter.

Keep up to date with Thiago on Twitter.

27 May 2021 
Read a new article co-authored by Dr Rishita Nandagiri

ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Rishita Nandagiri has co-authored a new article: Recent UK cuts to global health funding will cause irrevocable damage under the guise of ‘tough but necessary decisions’ published on LSE British Politics and Policy blog.

Rishita, Joe StrongTiziana Leone and Ernestina Coast explain why recent cuts to global health funding by the UK are devastating for certain countries and groups, while they also create a dangerous vacuum into which ‘philanthrocapitalists’ and private foundations will step, allowing them to set global development agendas without any political mandate.

Keep up to date with Rishita on Twitter.

26 May 2021
Read a new article co-authored by Dr Nimesh Dhungana

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Nimesh Dhungana and Dr Nicole Curato had published a new article titled 'When participation entrenches authoritarian practice: Ethnographic investigations of post-disaster governance'.

The paper is based on a comparative ethnographic analysis of the politics of citizen participation in two post-disaster contexts and it is part of International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.

Keep up to date with Nimesh on Twitter.

25 May 2021
Dr Martin Lukac wrote a short tutorial about deploying a {plumber} API on AWS EC2 instance

LSE Fellow in Computational Social Science Dr martin Lukac has written a short tutorial about deploying a {plumber} API on AWS EC2 instance aimed at computational social scientists who have some experience with AWS and R. 

In the last decade, R infrastructure has grown by leaps and bounds. Expansions like {Shiny} and {plumber} made it extremely easy to generate value with your analysis and models. The short tutorial focus on rolling out an API via {plumber} on a free-tier Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 instance.

Keep up to date with Martin on Twitter

18 May 2021 
Dr Audrey Alejandro invited to a workshop hosted by Bielefeld University on 26th & 27th May 2021

Assistant Professor of Qualitative Text Analysis Dr Audrey Alejandro has been invited to present as part of the online workshop "Objects of Expertise: The Politics of Socio-Material Expert Knowledge in World Society" hosted by Bielefeld University.

Audrey's presentation will be delivered alongside Joshua FeIdman on the subject of "How International organisations turned a genital ritual into a global health policy: the resemantisation of male circumcision as a practice of world politics".

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter

17 May 2021
New research from Professor Jon Jackson and Professor Patrick Sturgis on vaccine confidence

This research is titled 'The crucial relationship between a society’s trust in science and vaccine confidence'.

Ian Brunton-Smith (University of Surrey), Jonathan Jackson, and Patrick Sturgis find that people who live in societies where trust in science is high are more confident about vaccination.

What is new about their research is that they consider the role of societal level trust in science. They ask whether people living in societies with a higher level of trust in science are more confident about vaccination, over and above their own individual level of trust. And, in addition to considering country-level differences in average levels of trust in science, they also assess the role of societal consensus about it. People who live in countries with a strong supportive culture for science will (a) be more likely to trust science and (b) rely more heavily on trust as a decision heuristic. This helps them reach a position on vaccination that aligns more strongly with the dominant normative view around the scientific and regulatory systems that underpin vaccination programmes.

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter.

Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter.

14 May 2021
Dr Ruxandra Serban's evidence and recommendations cited in a report published by the Australian House of Representatives

The Australian House of Representatives Standing Committee on Procedure is reforming its Question Time procedure and just publishes a report citing LSE Fellow Dr Ruxandra Serban's evidence and recommendations based on her comparative research into questioning mechanisms in different parliaments. 

Also published in this article.

Keep up to date with Ruxandra on Twitter.

3 May 2021
Read a new article co-authored by Professor Jon Jackson

Head of Department Professor Jon Jackson has co-authored a new article published in LSE Public Policy Review.

This article is titled 'Us and Them: On the Motivational Force of Formal and Informal Lockdown Rules' co-authored by Professor Ben Bradford from UCL, and explores how social norms and legal requirements combine to shape collective behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The article draws on the Policing the Pandemic project and its data supports the idea that "government and public health messaging should focus on normative rather than instrumental reasons to adhere to guidelines and regulations".

Keep up to date with Jon on Twitter.

16 April 2021
Join Dr Sonja Marzi at a webinar hosted by the LOVA Netherlands Association for Gender Studies and Feminist Anthropology

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Sonja Marzi has been invited to take part in a websinar hosted by LOVA Netherlands Association for Gender Studies and Feminist Anthropology.

The webinar is titled 'Harassment in the field - Reflections on safety and vulnerability during fieldwork' and takes place on 27 and 28 May 2021.

Sonja will lead an interactive workshop on remote and digital ethnography. You can sign up to attend this session by contacting the organiser by email before the deadline of 20 May.

15 April 2021
Dr Juraj Medzihorsky invited to speak at a panel event on global democracy

LSE Fellow Dr Juraj Medzihorsky has been invited to join the panel of an event on global democracy. This event will be hosted by The German Marshall Fund of the United States.

This event is titled 'Measuring Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe: Do Scores Matter?' and will aim to answer questions related to the challenges and results of measuring democracy in Central and Eastern Europe.

The event will take place on 15 April 2021, beginning at 13:30 BST. Juraj is joined on the panel by Zselyke Csáky and Sabine Donner.

You can keep up to date with Juraj on Twitter and find out more about this event in this Twitter thread.

13 April 2021
Dr Audrey Alejandro presents at ISA 2021

Assistant Professor of Qualitative Text Analysis Dr Audrey Alejandro was recently invited to present as part of the ISA 2021 Conference. This was the 62nd Annual Convention hosted by the International Studies Association.

Audrey's first presentation was on "'Local' vs 'International': a demonstration of how to problematize categories of analysis". This was delivered alongside Assistant Professor in Qualitative Methods Dr Ellie Knott.

The second presentation was delivered alongside Joshua FeIdman on the subject of "Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision: the Discursive Legitimation of a Controversial International Policy".

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter.

1 April 2021
Listen to a new podcast with Dr Aliya Rao

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao appears on the latest episode of the Covid-19 and Democracy Podcast.

This podcast explores the intersection between COVID-19 pandemic and democratic politics and policy. Aliya appears on the episode titled 'The Shecession: The Covid-19 Pandemic & Female (Un)Employment'.

This podcast is related to a blog recently published by Aliya that focuses on the bleak prospects for women who lost their jobs in the pandemic.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

31 March 2021
Read an interview with Dr Aliya Rao with the American Sociological Association

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao has been interviewed by the American Sociological Association for their Winter 2021 newsletter.

This spotlight interview explores Aliya's newly-published book 'Crunch Time: How Married Couples Confront Unemployment' and areas of research.

Topics covered in this interview include how and why Aliya decided to enter the field of gender and unemployment research and how diversity has contributed to Aliya's research, as well as Aliya's future research plans.

The interviewer Gökhan Mülayim (Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at Boston University) also asked Aliya's thoughts on whether qualitative research is currently losing ground, or gaining a new significance.

This interview comes after the book got the "silver" medal in the Axiom awards within the category of women/minorities in business. Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

29 March 2021
Read a new article co-authored by Dr Rishita Nandagiri 

ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Rishita Nandagiri has co-authored a new article published in Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters.

This article is titled 'Self-managed abortion: a constellation of actors, a cacophony of laws?' and is co-authored by Dr Lucía Berro Pizzarossa.

The article explores self-managed abortion, which is broadly understood as actions or activities undertaken by a pregnant individual to end a pregnancy outside of clinical settings. However there is considerable debate in regard to how this is understood, due to a range of approaches, politics and standpoints.

Keep up to date with Rishita on Twitter and find out more about the article via this Twitter thread.

26 March 2021
Dr Alasdair Jones has co-authored chapter published in 'Identity at the Borders and Between the Borders'  

Associate Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Alasdair Jones has been published in the edited volume of 'Identity at the Borders and Between the Borders.'

Alasdair has co-authored a chapter titled 'Cities of Senses: Visible and Invisible Borders in Public Spaces' alongside Luca Tateo, Raili Nugin, Giuseppina Marsico and Hannes Palang.

This chapter focuses on the role of borders in public space. In particular, the chapter considers the role borders can play in "mediating the integration of out-groups" such as older people, immigrants and ethnic minorities into civic life.

Aladair is also presenting a paper at the 'Sustainable Care Conference' which takes place vitually between 12 - 30 April.

In collaboration with colleagues at LSE's CPEC, Alasdair will deliver a prerecorded talk on the subject of 'Meeting dementia care needs through market shaping?' This process evaluation presents a case study of financial incentive-based care quality implemented by one English local authority.

26 March 2021
Read a new article published by Dr Nimesh Dhungana on Nepali migrants during the time of COVID-19

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Nimesh Dhungana has published a new #LSEThinks blog that reflects on the subsequent situation following the Nepali government’s abrupt decision to close the open Nepal-India border.

The sudden closure of this border sparked major public outrage but Nimesh's blog, titled 'Brief outrage – but little tangible progress: Nepali migrants in the time of COVID', argues that this has been to little avail.

Nimesh argues that the subsequent political crisis has hindered any meaningful policy interventions aimed at the marginalised migrants.

Keep up to date with Nimesh on Twitter.

25 March 2021
Dr Aliya Rao quoted in the Financial Times

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao has been quoted in the Financial Times.

This piece is titled 'Covid lockdown is tough on couples' and explores the positive and negative impacts of couples being "cooped up together 24/7".

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

23 March 2021
Dr Rishita Nandagiri to chair a panel event hosted by the Global Health Initiative

ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Rishita Nandagiri will be chairing a panel event hosted by the Global Health Initiative

This event is titled The Power to Say Yes, The Right to Say No and Rishita will chair a discussion with Natalia Kanem, Executive Director of UNFPA, the United Nations sexual and reproductive health agency.

The discussion will focus onwill discuss why bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights are fundamental to advancing human dignity and equality, prosperity and peace, and sustainable development that leaves no one behind.

The event will take place from 15:00 - 16:00 on Monday 29 March. Register for the event here.

22 March 2021
Read a new blog from Dr Aliya Rao on how COVID-19 has impacted women in work

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao has published a new #LSEThinks blog that explores the impacts of COVID-19 on women and employment.

This blog is titled 'Nothing cute about the ‘shecession’: the bleak prospects for women who lost their jobs in the pandemic' and discusses the current spate of job losses. This has been termed the “shecession” (a twin of the “man-cession” of 2007-2009).

Aliya argues that job losses will have devastating consequences for professional trajectories and gender inequality. Moreover, the blog explains that the situation will be dire for disadvantaged women who will likely face far worse re-employment prospects. 

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

19 March 2021
Read a new blog from MSc in Social Research Methods student Chelsea Oware

MSc in Social Research Methods student Chelsea Oware has published a new Africa at LSE blog that argues safe space community centres to be essential for a community under attack.

This blog is titled 'What does ‘freedom and justice’ mean for Ghana’s LGBTQ+ community?' and is written following the closure of Ghana’s only LGBTQ+ community centre. Chelsea argues that this is the latest in a line of examples of identity-based oppression in Ghana in the period since British colonialism.

As homophobic and queerphobic rhetoric continues to dominate the national conversation, Chelsea suggests that safe space community centres are essential for these communities.

We are very proud of our active student community who contribute to wider debate. Keep up to date with Chelsea on Twitter.

18 March 2021
Dr Aliya Rao to present new book 'Crunch Time' at a joint book salon with Dr Nazanin Shahrokni

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao will take part in a joint book salon on 19 March 2021 (16:30 GMT).

At this event organised by the Gender/Power/Theory network at Northwestern University, Aliya will present her new book 'Crunch Time - How Married Couples Confront Unemployment' and Dr Nazanin Shahrokni will present 'Women in Place'.

Following these presentations, both authors will hold a question and answer session to explain their research in detail.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

17 March 2021
Read a new blog from Professor Patrick Sturgis on vaccination hesitancy amongst young people

Professor of Quantitative Social Science Patrick Sturgis has published a new #LSEThinks blog on the subject of on vaccination hesitancy amongst young people.

This blog is titled 'Almost two-thirds of Black British young people would be reluctant to get a COVID vaccine' and reports on the findings of a joint survey from UCL CEPEO and LSE COVID-19, funded by UKRI. This survey finds that one third of young people have doubts about taking the vaccine, with hesitancy significantly higher among non-White respondents.

The survey records information from a sample of 4,255 respondents, a subset of the 6,409 respondents who consented to recontact as part of the Wellcome Trust Science Education Tracker (SET) 2019 survey.

The Guardian also reports on this survey, noting that few respondents expressed trust in social media as a source of news.

This blog was co-authored by Lindsey MacmillanJake Anders and Gill Wyness. Keep up to date with Patrick on Twitter.

15 March 2021
Read a two new articles featuring comments from Dr Daniele Fanelli

LSE Fellow in Quantitative Methodology Dr Daniele Fanelli has been featured in two new articles, published by Science Mag and one by Horizons.

The Science Mag article 'What is research misconduct? European countries can’t agree' discusses the 2017 European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity, developed by the European Federation of Academies of Sciences and Humanities. 

Daniele was questioned about a study by Hugh Desmond that explores the extent to which countries have adopted this. Daniele argues that the study's method overestimates differences between countries. 

In Horizons, an article titled 'Going beyond statistical significance' allows Daniele some space to discuss the issue of publication bias.

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter.

12 March 2021
Dr Sonja Marzi to screen the final documentary from KEI project 'Reinventada'

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Sonja Marzi is to screen the final documentary from her 'Reinventada' LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact Project.

This project explores the realities of women living in Medellín during COVID-19 and uses an innovative and pioneering method of ‘remote participatory video’ utilising smartphones.

Throughout the project, participants were trained on how to best use their smartphones and available technology to film and edit a documentary that discussed the impact of the pandemic on their everyday lives. 

At an event hosted by the Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC), Sonja will screen the film that resulted from this collaborative work, followed by reflections on the process from the research team and Q&A session.

This event begins at 16:15 (GMT) on Wednesday 24 March 2021 and you can sign up here.

10 March 2021
Read a new LSE COVID-19 blog on lockdown compliance from Professor Jon Jackson 

Head of the Department Professor Jon Jackson has published a new LSE COVID-19 blog on the issue of lockdown compliance.

This blog is titled 'When lockdown law is effectively unenforceable, what motivates people to obey it?'. Jon and co-author Ben Bradford (UCL) argue that law has offered a powerful way for people to understand their social obligations during the pandemic.

The blog draws on the Policing the Pandemic project and its data supports the idea that "government and public health messaging should focus on normative rather than instrumental reasons to adhere to guidelines and regulations".

10 March 2021
Dr Daniele Fanelli involved in debate on scientific credibility

LSE Fellow in Quantitative Methodology Dr Daniele Fanelli has had an article published in a special issue of Congressional Quarterly 'Expertise Under Assault'.

Daniele has contributed to a debate with Jon Krosnik on the question of "Is there a credibility crisis in science?" in which Daniele argues that rather than science becoming less credible or declining, instead it is becoming more complex.

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter.

9 March 2021
Read a new report from The Alan Turing Institute co-authored by a member of our alumni community

Former MSc in Applied Social Data Science student Laila Sprejer has co-authored a report with The Alan Turing Institute.

This report is titled 'Where are the women? Mapping the gender job gap in AI' and charts women’s participation in data science and AI in the UK and elsewhere.

The report analyses a curated dataset through innovative data science methodology and findings reveal extensive disparities between women and men.

We are very proud of our former students and enjoy staying in contact with them after they finish their studies. Find out more about our alumni community here.

4 March 2021
Dr Daniele Fanelli's 'Covid Consensus' project discussed in a Quillette article

LSE Fellow in Quantitative Methodology Dr Daniele Fanelli's 'Covid Consensus' project has been discussed as part of a Quillette article.

This article is titled 'Lockdown Scepticism Was Never a 'Fringe' Viewpoint' and explores Daniele's research, a project aimed at measuring and fostering consensus on controversial scientific and social matters relating to COVID-19.

Daniele has identified and contacted over 1,800 authors of papers relating to COVID-19, asking them to what extent they support a ‘focused protection’ policy against COVID-19, as proposed in the Great Barrington Declaration.

Daniele's project attempts to gauge expert opinion on focussed-protection in order to meet goals such as informing the public about the current scientific consensus, fighting the spread of conspiracy theories and disinformation, and watching how opinions change over time.

Keep up to date with Daniele on Twitter.

3 March 2021
Department of Methodology to collaborate in KEI video project

Members of the Department of Methodology have been invited to take part in a Knowledge Exchange and Impact project.

Contributors from the Department will be filming videos to explain more about the specifics of their research and would like members of the public to engage with this process.

Department of Methodology contributors include Dr. Audrey Alejandro, Dr. Blake Miller, Thiago Oliveira, Dr. Aliya Rao and Professor Patrick Sturgis. They welcome any questions about their substantive research areas, or about research in general.

If you wish to become involved in the project, please get in contact with the contributors directly, Maia Films or with the Department of Methodology

 

2 March 2021
Dr Siân Brooke interviewed by Channel 5 News on the subject of Taylor Swift

LSE Fellow in Computational Social Science Dr Siân Brooke has been interviewed on Channel 5 News.

Siân discussed misogyny and the power of having a platform following Taylor Swift's comments on the Netflix show 'Ginny and Georgia'. Swift had criticised the show for containing a "lazy" and "deeply sexist" joke. 

Keep up to date with Siân on Twitter.

1 March 2021
Dr Sonja Marzi invited to speak at the Pandemic Fieldwork Panel

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Sonja Marzi has been invited to speak at an online event hosted by the University of Colorado Boulder and North Carolina State University.

This Pandemic Fieldwork Panel takes place on Tuesday 9 March at 15:45 (GMT). Sonja will discuss the challenges of undertaking qualitative fieldwork during COVID-19 by relating on experience of Reinventada, a project exploring the realities of women in Medellín during the pandemic.

Other members of the panel include Kristen Barber (Southern Illinois University), Jennifer Carlson (University of Arizona), Brooke Dinsmore (University of Virginia) and Eric Schoon (Ohio State University).

26 February 2021
Dr Aliya Rao invited to take part in the Pennoni Panel on COVID-19 and the 'She'cession

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao has been invited to take part in an event in a Pennoni Panel event as part of the Pennoni Womxn's Week.

This event, titled 'COVID-19 and the and 'She'cession', takes place on Wednesday March 3 2021 at 20:30 (GMT) and will unpack the ways in which COVID-19 has impaced women's labour.

The pandemic has caused many to reevaluate work and the structure of the economy and this event will discuss questions of what is meant when we discuss women's labour, whether working from home provides women more agency and how this blurs the lines between work, home and leisure time.

You can sign up to attend this event here and keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

25 February 2021
Dr Sonja Marzi to appear as a guest lecturer at Wageningen University

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methods Dr Sonja Marzi has been invited to guest lecture at Wageningen University, NL.

Sonja will teach on virtual participatory and visual remote methods as part of their ‘Transformative and Participatory Research Methods Course’ next week. This course provides both conceptual and hands-on methodological engagement with transformative, participatory and action research approaches that use creative and arts-based research methods. The course focuses on the inclusion and engagement of diverse (often marginalised) perspectives. 

This course will run on most days of next week, with Sonja's session takes place in the afternoon of Tuesday 2 March.

24 February 2021
Dr Ellie Knott to chair an event with the Association for the Study of Nationalities

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Methods Dr Ellie Knott has been invited to chair an event organised by the Association for the Study of Nationalities.

This event is titled 'Non-academic Writing for Academics' and takes place on Thursday 25 February at 17:30 (London). If you wish to join this event, you can register to attend here.

This event will explore the subject of how academics can write up research in a way that is accessible for a variety of audiences, arguably one of the least taught skills for new academics.

The session will address how to think about the differences between academic and non-academic writing, how to present years of research in a condensed format for varied audiences, and "how to overcome the reflex to squeeze a literature review into everything".

Keep up to date with Ellie on Twitter.

23 February 2021
Dr Aliya Rao to host an event as part of the LSE Festival 2021

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Aliya Rao will host an event as part of the LSE Festival 2021. 

This festival is free and open to all, this year exploring the direction the world could and should take in the wake of COVID-19 as well as how social science research can shape this.

Aliya will host a Festival Short titled 'Why is Unemployment Bad for Gender Inequality?' that will discuss how unemployment reinforces gender inegalitarian norms and behaviours when it comes to time, space and emotions.

In this Festival Short that takes place on Thursday 4 March 2021, Aliya will also explore how the world might tackle the impact of COVID-19 and how this pandemic has exposed rampant gender inequalities.

The recording of this event is now available on YouTube.

Keep up to date with Aliya on Twitter.

22 February 2021
Read a new article from LSE Fellow Martin Lukac

A pre print of a new article from LSE Fellow in Computational Social Science Martin Lukac has been published by SocArXiv.

This paper is titled 'Two worlds of online labour markets: Exploring segmentation using finite mixture models and a network of skill co-occurrence' and through adopting propositions from labour market segmentation literature, Martin shows that online labour markets are composed of structurally delimited segments with different social processes governing the allocation of work.

Together with other findings, Martin shows results to provide a new explanation for the persistence of diversified experiences in online labour markets. Find more information in this Twitter thread.

Keep up to date with Martin on Twitter

19 February 2021
Read an interview with Dr Kate Summers in The Guardian

LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methodology Dr Kate Summers has spoken to The Guardian's Social Policy Editor Patrick Butler on the subject of the Welfare at A Social Distance project.

This project calls for a re-think of the social security system and Kate argues that "We should think more ambitiously about what ‘success’ means within our social security benefits system."

Claimants report struggling to pay bills or put any money aside amid the ongoing COVID-19 crisis and one in six new universal credit claimants has been forced to skip meals.

This major national research project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council as part of UK Research and Innovation’s Rapid Response to COVID-19.

Keep up to date with Kate on Twitter.

15 February 2021
Read a new blog from Dr Ellie Knott on Moldova's repeal of its controversial 'citizenship by investment' scheme

Assistant Professor in Qualitative Methods Dr Ellie Knott has published a new blog post in Global CIT on the subject of citizenship by investment in Moldova.

In 2016, Moldova joined a growing group of countries that offer citizenship by investment (CBI) schemes. In this blog 'Moldova Repeals its Short-lived but Controversial Citizenship by Investment Scheme', Ellie explains the introduction of CBI to Moldova and its threat to the country.

To explain why the CBI scheme was repealed and the scheme short-lived, Ellie explores ways in which Moldova’s political landscape has shifted, as well as external factors, causing the end of the CBI scheme.

This blog builds on the recent report on Updates to Moldovan Citizenship Legislation published by Ellie that explores how more recent changes to Moldova's legal framework of citizenship chart a different path.

Keep up to date with Ellie on Twitter.

9 February 2021
Police in the classroom - read a new report from Dr Chris Pósch and Professor Jonathan Jackson

Visiting Fellow Dr Chris Pósch and Head of the Department Professor Jonathan Jackson have published a new report that evaluates a three-wave cluster-randomised controlled trial on Police presence within the classroom.

This report is titled 'Police in the classroom' and tests the impact of police officers helping to deliver Personal, Social, Health, and Economic Education (PSHE) lessons in schools. Findings of the report include a suggestion that Police-led lessons on drugs in schools can boost engagement and trust among pupils. The report does not, however, recommend that police officers go into schools in an enforcement, surveillance or protective capacity.

Report co-author Professor Jonathan Jackson said: “This first-of-its-kind trial found robust and long-lasting effects on young people’s attitudes.

“Interactions with police officers are teachable moments, where individuals learn about the nature of society and its institutions, as well as their role and position within society.

“Because ‘good contact’ helps to engender trust and legitimacy, and ‘bad contact’ helps to damage people’s relationship with the law, it is important to get these encounters right.

“Police officers engaging with education in schools may help engineer the type of positive experiences that foster a sense of trust and legitimacy, particularly because they are on young people’s own turf.”

This report has been presented as part of the Child Centred Policing launch event taking place today. Other contributors to this launch include Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield who speaks on Children’s Rights and Policing and Pavan Dhaliwal, CEO of Revolving Doors, who speaks on Young Adults and their Perception of Policing.

In conjunction with this report, a video that summarises the project has been released.

8 February 2021
Dr Audrey Alejandro to present at the 4th forTEXT expert workshop

Assistant Professor of Qualitative Text Analysis Dr Audrey Alejandro has been invited to present at the 4th forTEXT expert workshops.

This workshop 'Development and Application of Category Systems for Text Research' aims to focus on practical experience to identify the requirements that arise in the context of digital humanities projects.

The workshop takes place on 17 and 18 February and Audrey's talk at the workshop is titled 'From social sciences to text research: problematising categories as a reflexive approach to improve analytical work'. Register to attend the workshop here.

Keep up to date with Audrey on Twitter.

4 February 2021
Join an event to present new data from the Welfare at a (Social) Distance project involving Dr Kate Summers

The ongoing 'Welfare at a Social Distance' research project involving LSE Fellow in Qualitative Methodology Dr Kate Summers is holding an event to present new data from the project that shares experiences of claimants' benefit receipt during COVID-19.

This major national research project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council as part of UK Research and Innovation’s Rapid Response to COVID-19. In addition to presenting data, this event will consider the steps required to provide more complete social security, both for the rest of the pandemic and beyond.

This event takes place on Friday 19 February (11:00 - 12:00) and you can sign up here.

3 February 2021
Watch Dr Flora Cornish take part in an International Inequalities Institute panel event

Associate Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology Dr Flora Cornish recently took part in a panel event hosted by the International Inequalities Institute.

This event was titled 'The Politics of Inequality: why should we focus on resistance from below?' and Flora appeared alongside John ChalcroftEllen HelsperArmine IshkanianSumi Madhok and Alpa Shah.

This event has been made available both as a podcast and as a video

Flora discusses how activism and community solidarity after the Grenfell Tower tragedy is a crucial beacon of hope, especially in a context of crushing inertia in the social and political systems that led to the disaster.