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Research

A collection of videos highlighting current research at LSE.

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Why Gender Matters for Social Science

Released on: 2 December 2013

Contributor(s): LSE Academics

'Why Gender Matters for Social Science' was originally designed for the LSE100 gender module. The film comprises of a...

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Underground Sociabilities - Identity and Culture in Rio's Favelas

Released on: 1 August 2012

Contributor(s): Professor Sandra Jovchelovitch

During the nineteenth and the twentieth century, rapid economic and social development concentrated ever greater...

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Capturing the Cut - on the invention of medical illustration

Released on: 31 October 2011

Contributor(s): Christelle Rabier

In this short film, Wellcome Fellow Christelle Rabier of LSE's department of Economic History narrates the invention of...

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Visual Rhetoric

Released on: 18 May 2011

Contributor(s): Mercy Nahmo, Vlad Glaveanu, Martin Bauer, Luca Savorelli, Lila Caballero-Sosa, Aurelie Bahsa i Novosejt, Ben Voyer, Ben Wilson, Sara Belton, Penny Hilton, Stavroula Tsirogianni, Tom Pritchard

Computer processing has revolutionised the social sciences, enabling the collection and processing of…

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Arab Television and Arab Identity

Released on: 22 March 2011

Contributor(s): Myria Georgiou, Ramy Aly

Throughout the so-called War On Terror, trans-national Arab television stations such as AL Jazeera have supplied a...

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The Mathematics Genealogy Project

Released on: 23 February 2011

Contributor(s): Mitchel T. Keller

What motivates people to trace their academic ancestry? With 150,000 names in his database, Mitchel T. Keller explains what the Mathematics Genealogy Project is and how it works.

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The Library in the Digital Age

Released on: 7 December 2010

Contributor(s): Alan Bracey, Ed Fay, Sue Donnelly

As widespread digitisation of books triggers the most significant shift in reading habits since the Gutenberg press, what happens to the libraries?

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The Limits of Human Rights

Released on: 7 December 2010

Contributor(s): Professor Chetan Bhatt

Is everyone entitled to the protection of human rights or do some - like the Al Qaeda activist targeted for execution by the United States - forfeit that protection? Professor Chetan Bhatt, in this short video, examines the issues.

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Opportunities and Risks for Children Online

Released on: 20 October 2010

Contributor(s): Professor Sonia Livingstone

What risks do children face online? How often do they encounter material that they find upsetting? Researchers asked 23,000 children across Europe what they had seen and done online.

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Raising the Quality of Qualitative Research

Released on: 20 August 2010

Contributor(s): Dr Kavita Abraham

Researcher bias is a problem when interpreting texts. Kavita Abraham, of LSE's Methodology Institute, explains what happens if you get a computer program to do the interpretation for you.

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A Very Modern Action: The Spring Reprisals of 1917

Released on: 10 August 2010

Contributor(s): Dr Heather Jones

How do reprisals against prisoners of war affect wartime decision-making? In 1917, the Germans calculated that public outrage could be used to their advantage. Heather Jones explains.

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Washington's revolving door

Released on: 15 July 2010

Contributor(s): Mirko Draca

Former political staff turned lobbyists in the US claim their high salaries reflect their abilities, but critics complain they are merely exploiting political connections. Mirko Draca explains who's winning the argument.

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The moral structure of legal systems - part 1: positivism versus natural law

Released on: 4 June 2010

Contributor(s): Dr Kristen Rundle

Is morality intrinsic to law? In the first of two films on The moral structure of legal systems, Dr Kristen Rundle explains how an argument between two legal philosophers rumbles on fifty years later.

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The moral structure of legal systems - part 2: an insurance against tyranny?

Released on: 4 June 2010

Contributor(s): Dr Kristen Rundle

Part II of The moral structure of legal systems concerns a peculiar correlation: tyrannical regimes tend to possess chaotic legal systems. Dr Kristen Rundle asks: Why?

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The Mathematics of Machine Learning

Released on: 4 May 2010

Contributor(s): Professor Martin Anthony

Computers struggle with tasks we find simple. Professor Martin Anthony explains what role mathematicians play in making computers less stupid.

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A New Approach To Child Protection

Released on: 15 April 2010

Contributor(s): Professor Eileen Munro

Inspired by the findings of air crash investigations, Professor Munro explains the need for a new "systems approach" to rectifying the failings of the child protection agencies.

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The Second Indian Green Revolution

Released on: 10 March 2010

Contributor(s): Peter Howlett, Aashish Velkar

Two LSE economic historians trying to understand India's agricultural past find themselves studying a parallel story in the present.

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On the evolution of morality

Released on: 29 January 2010

Contributor(s): Dr Jason Alexander

Is there one moral scheme that is true for all people at all times? Is it ours? No, and probably not; says philosopher Jason Alexander, as he explores the evolution of morality.

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Choice and the Future of Healthcare

Released on: 8 December 2009

Contributor(s): Zack Cooper

Zack Cooper of LSE Health looks at what the US healthcare system and the NHS might learn from one another and where the 'patient choice' agenda is going next.

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Living in the Second Nuclear Age

Released on: 7 December 2009

Contributor(s): Professor Arne Westad

Whatever happened to the bomb? Nuclear weapons never went away, we just stopped paying them any attention. In fact we're now living in "the Second Nuclear Age". Professor Arne Westad of IDEAS explains.

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