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LSE honours pioneering economists Sir William Arthur Lewis and Professor Timothy Besley

TimBesley238x357Professor Tim Besley is to become the inaugural Sir William Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

The William Arthur Lewis Chair, created by LSE to mark the centenary of the Nobel Prize winner’s birth, was formally announced at LSE’s Sir Arthur Lewis Centenary Event on Understanding Economic Development last night (Monday 22 June).

Professor Stuart Corbridge, Deputy Director and Provost of LSE, said: “LSE is proud today to be honouring two pioneering economists, one born 100 years ago this year, the other still providing expertise to policymakers today. William Arthur Lewis was a leader in the field of development economics and LSE is delighted to honour him with the creation of the named professorship. With his expertise in the same field, and long history with the School, Professor Timothy Besley is the perfect recipient of this inaugural professorship.”

Professor Tim Besley said: “I am delighted to be named as the first Sir William Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics. I shall do my best to carry forward his legacy at the school by engaging with the issues brought to the fore in his pioneering research on economic development.”

Professor Tim Besley has been at the LSE for 20 years and a School Professor of Economics and Political Science since 2012. An external member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee from September 2006 to August 2009, he is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, the British Academy, and the European Economic Association, as well as a foreign honorary member of the American Economic Association and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Professor Beseley was also named 2005 winner of the Yrjö Jahnsson Award of the European Economics Association, which is granted every other year to an economist aged under 45 who has made a significant contribution to economics in Europe.

WilliamArthurLewis2Sir Arthur Lewis (1915-1991) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1979 for “pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries. A student at LSE from 1934-37 and a member of staff from 1938-48, making him the UK’s first black professor, he also served in the Civil Service during the war, first as a Principal in the Board of Trade and then in the Colonial Office. Read more about the Nobel Prize winner, “one of our best teachers”, at LSE History

 

A podcast of Professor Sir Paul Collier and Professor Dani Rodrik discussing Understanding Economic Development at LSE's Sir Arthur Lewis Centenary Event can be heard here

 

23 June 2015

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