Reducing and preventing homelessness with support from the Mitchell Charitable Trust

LSE Housing and Communities receives £75,000 boost to tackle social challenge

We are pleased that our gift to LSE’s Housing and Communities project will be used to confront one of the most concerning social challenges facing London today

The Mitchell Charitable Trust

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Modern housing development

Housing people in need of a home, at a rent they can afford, and in conditions that will help them, their families and their communities to flourish - the Housing Plus Academy’s goals in London have recently been given a £75,000 boost by The Mitchell Charitable Trust.

Located within LSE’s Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, the Housing Plus Academy is a knowledge exchange and research partnership with LSE Housing and Communities.

It works closely with small landlords, community-led and community-based housing organisations, and local authorities on homelessness prevention and reduction.

Mitchell Trust - Housing Plus discussion
Discussions at a Housing Plus Academy event

The partnership with the Trust will enable six interconnected aspects of the Academy to be developed over the next three years. These include: research activities focussing on the issues around rough sleeping; temporary housing; private renting and the potential for secure tenancies; smaller social landlords; community-led housing; and learning from the Grenfell disaster. “We are pleased that our gift to LSE’s Housing and Communities project will be used to confront one of the most concerning social challenges facing London today,” said Trust spokesperson Antonia Mitchell.

Anne Power, CBE, Professor of Social Policy and Head of LSE Housing and Communities, said, “Many charitable and non-profit housing models arose over a long history. Hundreds of years of housing history gives us an intense mixture of landlords, tenures, property types, styles and so on. This makes housing management complex, challenging and yet vital.

“The financial crisis of 2008 and the long recession that followed forced many working in the housing world to re-visit the wider role of social landlords,” she added. “For housing does not work only through bricks and mortar and numbers. Severe funding cut-backs are affecting services and community conditions. Housing Plus is a long-term, relatively low-cost approach that has stood the test of time.”

“The support for our work from The Mitchell Charitable Trust has given us a tremendous boost, allowing us to tackle some of the most intractable housing problems in order to help people work together in difficult times.”

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