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LL102: Introduction to International Human Rights: Theory, Law and Practice

Course content

This course involves critical exploration of what is meant by human rights. It will investigate the possibility that the international human rights movement, together with the law that underpins it, can provide a universal ethical and legal order. There are three main areas of focus;

Theories and Histories of Human Rights

The course begins with an introductory account of the general idea of human rights and of the history of the idea from ancient Greek origins and the Enlightenment to contemporary understandings. Students will be exposed to several enduring human rights critiques and, through a series of case-studies, examine the tensions that the practice of human rights today highlights, such as in the areas of free speech, prohibiting torture, and countering terrorism.

Structures and Standards

The course then turns to assessing the structure and standards that govern international human rights law, beginning with an introduction as to what modern international law is and how it is made. This part of the course will consider the international and regional human rights systems and the range of legal instruments and standards that have been developed. 

Key issues in Human Rights

Finally, this intensive course will study selected key issues in international human rights law such as: 

  • The right to freedom from torture and inhuman or degrading treatment (including the issues of deportation and extradition, and the use of torture in the so-called “war on terror” and the “ticking bomb case”)
  • Sex, life, and death (including the sexual freedoms of gays and lesbians, the thorny issue of abortion, and the increasingly controversial issue of assisted suicide)
  • Freedom of expression (including the protection awarded to expression that is offensive to religious feelings, holocaust denial, and “hate speech”). 

Course outcomes

The intended learning outcome is an informed and critical understanding of contemporary international human rights theory, law and practice.

The School of Law is one of the largest departments at the LSE, and has recently been ranked 7th in the 2014 QS World Law School Rankings. On this three week intensive programme, you will engage with and learn from full-time lecturers from the LSE’s law faculty.  LL102 lecturers, Dr Jo Murkens and  Dr Emmanuel Voyiakis teach on a number of our undergraduate and graduate law modules, including Public Law, Comparative Constitutional Law and Advanced Torts.

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Texts*

Primary texts

All students should buy
S. Ghandi (ed.), Blackstone’s International Human Rights Documents, 8th edition, Oxford University Press (2012).

Then students should buy either

P. Alston & R. Goodman, International Human Rights, Oxford University Press (2012)

or R.K.M. Smith, Texts and Materials on International Human Rights, 3rd edition, Routledge (2013).

 

*A more detailed reading list will be supplied prior to the start of the programme

**Course content, faculty and dates may be subject to change without prior notice

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 KEY FACTS

Session: One

Dates: 6th July - 24th July 2015

Lecturer: Dr Jo Murkens |Dr Emmanuel Voyiakis|


Level : 100 level

Fees: Click here| for information

Prerequisites: None

Lectures: 36 hours 

Classes: 12 hours

Assessment*: Written work and one written examination

Typical credit**: 3 credits (US) 7.5 ECTS points (EU)


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*assessment is optional – see FAQ’s

**You will need to check with your home institution. Read more about credit transfer.