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How does the service work?

We have organised our alumni profiles by region to make it easy for you to direct your queries to someone from your part of the world. However you are free to contact any of the alumni listed here; you may want to ask about the programme that they studied here, or be interested in their career path since leaving LSE. We will be continuing to add more alumni profiles to the site, so we hope that your country will be represented here soon.

Once you have chosen the alum you wish to answer your enquiry, simply click on 'send message', fill in the short online form and click 'submit'. Your email will then be sent to the selected alum who will respond within seven working days. Please note that all emails must be written in English.

What kinds of questions can I ask?

Alumni can answer questions about:

  • Their experiences of moving to, and living in, London.
  • Life as an international student at LSE.
  • Studying in the UK.
  • Their transition back home and move into employment.

Alumni cannot answer queries about:

  • Admissions and entry requirements.
  • The application process.
  • Fees or financial support.
  • Current life on campus. 

Please read the relevant section of the website for further information on these topics. 

Click on the links below to see profiles of alumni in your region, and to Email an alum.

Africa and the Middle East|

Central Asia and East Asia|

Europe and the UK|

Latin America|

North America and the Caribbean|

South Asia|

South East Asia and the Pacific|

All emails will be sent via the Email an alum administrator and those found to include offensive or abusive content will be deleted. If your email contains queries which fall outside the remit of this service we will endeavour to pass your question to the appropriate department.

The answers given by our alumni are based on their personal experiences. The opinions and views expressed are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of LSE. 

 

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