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South Asia Centre
London School of Economics
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London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)20 7107 5330

Email southasiacentre@lse.ac.uk

 

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Upcoming Events

SouthAsiaDvlpmntConf2

South Asia Development Conference

Saturday 29th April 2017

10:00 to 6:00pm

Old Theatre, Old Building

Speakers: Nobel Laureate Kaliash Satyarthi, Acclaimed Journalist Najam Sethi, Ex Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar

Conceptualised by the LSE SU South Asia Society in collaboration with the LSE South Asia Centre, the LSE South Asia Development Conference is a unique initiative which has been pioneered to serve as a forum to identify, discuss and influence the development discourse in the region.

Building on the essence of regional cooperation and globalisation, it seeks to incorporate and address the challenges faced by the region as a whole as opposed to individual countries. This not only fosters a sense of unity and common purpose, but also serves as a precedent for the development of better regional cooperation, as well as facilitating the emergence of leaders with a regional, synergy driven outlook.

The summit will involve some of the most prominent voices on South Asia and promises to drive forward the developmental agenda in South Asia. The debates, discussions and interactions held as a part of this conference will most definitely have a wider global reach, as well as the potential to influence political change makers of South Asia.

This is a ticketed event. For more updates and to buy tickets for the event - visit www.southasiadevconf.com

 
Roy Moxham

Distorting History: Robert Clive and the Capture of Bengal in 1757

This is a South Asia Centre public lecture which is part of the Colony as Empire: Histories from Whitehall series. 

Wednesday 17th May 2017

6:30-8:00pm

Alumni Theatre, NAB

Speaker: Roy Moxham 

Roy Moxham has made his mark in readers’ minds with his sensitive studies of the great hedge (2002) and tea (2003), highlighting the stark yet unknown consequences of British imperial rule in the subcontinent; he has also written a book on Phoolan Devi, India’s ‘Bandit Queen’ (2010). His forthcoming book The Theft of India (2017) deals with the human cost and consequences of Clive’s annexation of Bengal in 1757; while the Battle of Plassey (which led to the final defeat of Bengal is well-known, the tremendous human suffering and loss of life is a rarely discussed chapter in history. The Theft of India will be on sale at his lecture.

Roy Moxham grew up in Worcestershire. His varied and exciting life has seen him work on a Herefordshire fruit farm; as a tea planter in Nyasaland, and later Malawi – spending 13 years in Eastern Africa before returning to London in 1974 to set up a gallery of African art. He is a trained book and paper conservator, has worked at the Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Senate House library, University of London. From 2005, Moxham spends his time in writing and giving talks.

This event is free and open to all. 

Please email if you have any queries.    

 
LucyChester

The Radcliffe Boundary Commission and the Geographical Imagination of Pakistan

This is a South Asia Centre public lecture which is part of the Colony as Empire: Histories from Whitehall series.

Monday 16th October 2017

6:30pm - 8:00pm

TBC

Speaker: Dr Lucy Chester

The Radcliffe Boundary Commission, which drew the lines dividing India and Pakistan in 1947, brought both the culmination of hopes for an independent Muslim state in South Asia and disappointment for those who had imagined that state in a different geographic form.  Proponents of ‘Pakistan’ in the 1930s and 1940s held a variety of views about its rightful boundaries; this talk will examine the effects of earlier visualisations of that Pakistan on the work of the Radcliffe Commission.

Dr Lucy Chester is Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado Boulder. Lucy’s monograph Borders and Conflicts in South Asia: The Radcliffe Boundary Commission and the Partition of Punjab (2009) is the only modern study of the drawing of the Radcliffe Line (separating India and Pakistan) by Sir Cyril Radcliffe a few months before the partition of the Indian subcontinent in August 1947. Her more recent research has been on cartography, and on Britain and the Palestine Mandate.

This event is free and open to all. 

Please email if you have any queries.    

 
mahesh-rangarajan-262x300

Nature and Nation: India’s Post-Independence Environmental Transformations

This is a South Asia Centre public lecture which is part of the Colony as Empire: Histories from Whitehall series.

Monday 13th November 2017

6:30pm - 8:00pm

TBC

Speaker: Dr Mahesh Rangarajan

The aftermath of Indian independence not only witnessed an acceleration of rates of economic and demographic expansion, but was also a period when the ways in which people related to the environment underwent changes. These were of defining significance both in terms of ecological destruction and measures for conservation, yet are often overshadowed by socio-political narratives. This talk will reflect more deeply on the processes behind independent India’s environmental shifts and how its nature was remade.

Dr Mahesh Rangarajan is Professor of History and Environmental Studies at Ashoka University, Sonepat. He has written extensively on environment in Indian history. His most recent publication is Nature and Nation: Essays on Environmental History (2015), which discusses events and processes that show how specific environmental changes happened, and the global ecological dimensions of Indian transformations.

This event is free and open to all. 

Please email if you have any queries

 
DavidGilmartin

Pakistan and the Grand Narratives of 20th Century History 

This is a South Asia Centre public lecture which is part of the Colony as Empire: Histories from Whitehall series.

Monday 4th December 2017

6:30pm - 8:00pm

TBC

Speaker: Dr David Gilmartin

The birth of Pakistan as an historical event varies depending on the lens through which it is viewed and interpreted. In this talk, David Gilmartin will explore the different understandings of Pakistan produced by competing narratives of 20th century world history, whether it is empire and nation, religion and democracy, or environment and development.

Dr David Gilmartin is Professor of History at North Carolina State University. His research focuses on the intersection between history and imperialism in South Asia; he is currently working on the legal inheritances of India’s electoral institutions from colonial times, and their concomitant visions of sovereignty. His most recent publication is Blood and Water: The Indus River Basin in Modern History (2015).

This event is free and open to all. 

Please email if you have any queries.    

 
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