Training sessions and workshops

Monday 9 September, 4.45pm 

STUDYING PATHWAYS BETWEEN SOCIAL AND BIOLOGICAL FACTORS AND USING MODERN CAUSAL INFERENCE METHODS: AN EXAMPLE USING DATA FROM THE ONS LONGITUDINAL STUDY 

Bianca DeStavola, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Rhian Daniel, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Emily Grundy, University of Cambridge

In this workshop we aim to introduce participants to the language and methods of 'modern' causal inference and discuss how these can be used to guide the analysis of data from observational studies. In

particular, we will compare these more modern perspectives (based, for example, on causal diagrams) with traditional approaches (such as the 'epidemiological triangle') to defining and dealing with confounding.

Tuesday 10 September, 7.30am

CAREER MENTORING BREAKFAST (Fully booked)

Organised by Julia Mikolai, University of Southampton.

Tuesday 10 September, 11.00am

CeLSIUS: JOINT HANDS-ON TRAINING SESSION FOR THE THREE UK CENSUS LONGITUDINAL STUDIES (Fully booked)

Nicola Shelton & Rachel Stuchbury, CeLSIUS; Michael Rosato, NILS-RSU; Lee Williamson, SLS-DSU

The three UK Census Longitudinal Studies (the ONS LS, SLS and NILS) provide a rich and powerful resource for research for a diverse range of academic disciplines, policy-makers, practitioners and third sector bodies. They offer unparalleled detail for analysis at the individual level, with sample sizes that confer considerable power.

In addition to the rich information provided by the Censuses, the LSs variously contain additional linkages to administrative data such as education, prescribing, dental care, pollution levels and extensive health data. In some cases it is also possible for researchers to link an LS sample to their own provided data. The forthcoming addition of Census 2011 data makes this is an exciting time for the LSs as they extend their follow up of individuals to between 10 years (NILS) and 40 years (ONS LS).

The three LSs are maintained by specialist Support Unit teams, who support researchers in accessing and using the data. These teams are:

• CeLSIUS, supporting the ONS LS (England & Wales),
• NILS-RSU, supporting the NILS (Northern Ireland), and
• SLS-DSU, supporting the SLS (Scotland)

These have now also been joined by the CALLS Hub (Census and Administrative data LongitudinaL Studies Hub), which aims to support, promote and harmonise the work of the three Support Units.

This 90 minute session will aim to be of interest to both academic and non-academic audiences, and will provide a general introduction to the LSs and the Support Unit teams, in particular highlighting new data linkages such as Census 2011. This brief talk will be followed by an opportunity for delegates to:

• explore the new websites of CALLS and the Support Units;
• explore which variables are held by each LS;
• have a hands-on session with real data from the ONS LS;
• make use of the presence of team members from all three LS Support Units to get help with actually completing an application to use LS data;
• have the opportunity to talk in person with Support Unit staff about questions they have about the LSs, or to discuss the development of new research projects.

Tuesday 10 September, 4.45pm

LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING SESSION (Fully booked)

Led By Piers Elias, Tees Valley Joint Strategy Unit, with Sally Kenyon, Hampshire County Council, and Mark Green, University of Sheffield

Session 1. Sally Kenyon, Hampshire County Council : How to calculate Small Area Population Projections for customised geographies.

Session 2. Mark Green, University of Sheffield : Measuring the impact of policy interventions using matching methods. 
This session is now fully booked.

Wednesday 11 September 9.00am

SCOTTISH BEYOND 2011 WORKSHOP

Lamine Lachhab and Tom Wallace , with Gemma Jackson, National Records of Scotland

The census has long been the only way of producing small area population and socio-demographic information for the whole population. However, the traditional 10-year census cycle, coupled with an increasingly mobile population means this information can quickly become out-of-date. The Beyond 2011 programme in Scotland was formally established in September 2011 to research suitable methods for producing population and socio-demographic information. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) are doing similar research and the National Records of Scotland (NRS) will be working closely with these agencies throughout the programme.

The success of the Programme will depend on NRS having a clear understanding of user requirements and priorities and how these can be met with the possible options. Stakeholder engagement work combined with formal consultations will document these requirements.

This workshop will be held after the publication of a formal consultation report on the user requirements for producing population and socio-demographic statistics/information (http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/beyond-2011/consultations-events/consultations/user-requirements.html) and part of this workshop will be to reflect on these findings.

The workshop will be split into three elements.

Element 1: A brief presentation on the work of the Scottish Beyond 2011 programme detailing the results from the user consultation and how this is being fed into the options. This will set the context for the discussions.

Element 2: A discussion around the results of the consultation and how these can be combined with the different options.

Element 3: A discussion around the options themselves and the privacy, ethical, technological and legal issues surrounding these options.

Elements 2 and 3 will use interactive facilitation to progress the discussion, collecting the views of the participants and feeding into the body of evidence around the different issues within Beyond 2011.

Participants will have the option to reflect on how the work of the Scottish Beyond 2011 will combine with the work being carried out by ONS and NISRA.

 

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