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Department of Social Policy

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Department of Social Policy
2nd Floor, Old Building
London School of Economics and Political Science
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE

  

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The Department of Social Policy is the longest established in the UK.
The Department prides itself in being able to offer teaching based on the highest quality empirical research in the field. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the UK's nationwide assessment of research quality, impact and environment, which is undertaken every six to seven years, the Department was ranked first in the UK for world leading and internationally excellent research and was also awarded the joint highest marks for the non-academic impacts of its work. When adjusted to take account of the high proportion of staff submitted to REF, it is the number one UK Social Policy Department for overall research quality.
EmilyGrundy

Professor Emily Grundy elected a Fellow of the British Academy

Congratulations to Professor Emily Grundy, Professor of Demography, London School of Economics and Political Science for being elected a Fellow of the British Academy.

Fellows of the British Academy represent the very best of humanities and social sciences research, in the UK and globally. This year’s new Fellows are experts in subjects ranging from feminist theory to the economic development of Africa; medieval history to Indian philosophy and face perception.

Emily's research areas are: Health and well-being at older ages; family and household change; life course influences on health; intergenerational exchanges; demography of ageing.

Read more here

 
Brexit

Female EU citizens face disadvantage in claiming permanent residency in the UK

The finding was made as part of an LSE research project examining female EU citizens' experiences of trying to claim access to residence rights and social benefits.

The researchers, Dr Isabel Shutes of LSE’s Social Policy Department, and Sarah Walker of the Sociology Department at Goldsmiths, University of London, call on the government to address the gender implications of the conditions for acquiring legal residence and social rights. 

 
Dr Ernestina Coast

Academic abroad-Dr Ernestina Coast 

Dr Ernestina Coast gave the keynote “Sexual and reproductive health: evidence, perspectives and lifecourse” at the Reproductive Health Working Group annual meeting in Jordan. 

The three day meeting involved INGOs, funders and researchers from Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Iran, Turkey, occupied Palestinian territories and Morocco.

 
rainbow flag

Dr Tim Hildebrandt talks about recent censorship around homosexuality in China

Dr Timothy Hildebrandt was interviewed by the BBC for its coverage of a recent new media regulation in China that, among other restrictions, bans all depictions of homosexuality in online videos. Dr Hildebrandt drew upon his extensive and ongoing research into LGBT-related policies in China and elsewhere.

Read article here. Listen to audio version here

 

 
plattLucinda

Professor Lucinda Platt at the Understanding Society International conference

Professor Lucinda Platt gave a plenary at the Understanding Society international conference. The topic was: Ethnicity and identity: new perspectives.

Held at the University of Essex, the Understanding Society Scientific Conference provides an international forum for the exchange of research based on longitudinal household panel studies.

The three-day conference attracted 240 delegates from multiple countries (Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Australia, US, Korea) as well as UK, and from government departments and funding organisations, research organisations as well as universities. 

 
Child

Income directly affects children's outcomes

Poorer children have worse cognitive, social-behavioural and health outcomes because they are poor, and not just because poverty is correlated with other household and parental characteristics, according to a new report from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Kerris Cooper and Kitty Stewart of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion(CASE) and the Department of Social Policy at LSE found the strong evidence of the causal effect between household income and children’s outcomes after reviewing 61 studies from OECD countries including the US, UK, Australia, and Germany.

 
New housing

Low cost housing schemes have little impact on social mobility

A new LSE report for the Social Mobility Commission into the impact of low-cost homeownership schemes has found that those benefitting from schemes - such as Help to Buy – earn more than one and half times the national working age median income.

This latest research points out that the high cost of housing means many low-cost homeownership schemes are beyond the reach of almost all families on average earnings. 

 
Prison cell

The state of British prisons

Dr Leonidas Cheliotis was interviewed by the German Press Agency about the state of British prisons. Quoted in an article published by Deutsche Welle, Dr Cheliotis drew attention to the politicisation of penal policy in Britain and the concomitant lack of state commitment to alternatives to imprisonment. 

Read full article here.

 

 

 
Nicola Padfield

Public debate:  What if we rethought parole?

Date: Thursday 22nd June 2017
Time:
19.00-20.30
Venue:
The Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building

Speakers: Nicola Padfield, Professor Nick Hardwick, Dr Laura Janes

Chair: Dr Meredith Rossner

This lecture will discuss the present presumption that a parolee has to demonstrate they are not at risk of repeated offending and suggest that it should be the State to demonstrates the prisoner remains a risk.

Listen to the podcast

 
Further events are listed in the Department diary.

Past events are listed in News and Events archive.

Recent Podcasts

Nicola Padfield

What if we rethought parole?

Recorded on 22 June 2017

Speakers: Nicola Padfield, Professor Nick Hardwick, Dr Laura Janes

Chair: Dr Meredith Rossner

This lecture discussed the present presumption that a parolee has to demonstrate they are not at risk of repeated offending and suggest that it should be the State to demonstrates the prisoner remains a risk.

 
Literary Festival 2017

LSE Literary Festival 2017

Representing Poverty and Inequality: The legacy of Charles Booth

Recorded on 25 February 2017

Speakers:  Joseph Bullman, Professor Mary Morgan, Sarah Wise 

Chair:  Professor Nicola Lacey

 

Stagnation Generation: Exploring Intergenerational Fairness

Recorded on 22 February 2017

Speakers:  Nona Buckley-Irvine, Georgia Gould, Professor John Hills and Omar Khan 

Chair:  David Willetts

 
Drugs

Drug Policies Beyond the War on Drugs?

Recorded on 15 February 2017

Speakers: Dr John Collins, Professor Lawrence Phillips, Dr Joanne Csete, Dr Michael Shiner

As countries examine new ways of managing drug issues beyond the problematic and simplistic model of the 'war on drugs', this lecture examines how LSE research, among others, can help impact and drive government policies.

 

 
Lecture Theatre

The Relationship between Inequality and Poverty: mechanisms and policy options

Recorded on 8 February 2017

Speakers: Dr Eleni Karagiannaki and Dr Abigail McKnight 

This lecture examines the empirical relationship between economic inequality and poverty across countries and over time, paying attention to different measurement issues. It then considers a range of potential mechanisms driving this relationship and explores policy options.

 
More podcasts available at Events podcasts

External  Videos

BullyingVideo
Bullying Experiences of Disabled Children and Young People in England

Released on : 1 June 2016
Contributor: Professor Lucinda Platt

Research conducted by Stella Chatzitheochari (University of Warwick) in collaboration with Sam Parsons (University College London) and Lucinda Platt (London School of Economics and Political Science) suggests that children and young people with disabilities are more likely to be bullied at school compared to those students with no known disabilities.
 

Recent LSE Videos

This information is generated by an RSS feed from the Department audio and video channel, and shows the 4 most recent videos produced by the LSE.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Alex [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Alex [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Azhar [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Fleur [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
More videos available on the Social Policy Video Channel
More videos available on the CASE Video Channel
More videos available on the LSE Health and Social Care Video Channel

 

Latest Publications

This information is generated by an RSS feed from LSE Research Online, and shows the 20 most recent publications (either published, or accepted for publication).

Featured Publications
Improving Child Safety

Improving Child Safety: deliberation, judgement and empirical research

Centre for Humanities Engaging Science and Society (CHESS), Philosophy Department, Durham University
(Produced as part of the ERC funded Knowledge for Use (K4U) Research Project)

Authors: Eileen Munro, Nancy Cartwright, Jeremy Hardie, Eleonora Montuschi

If you are working in child protection or child welfare making decisions that affect children, young people and their families, or deciding how to organise the local child welfare system, or what programmes to provide in your area, this book is intended for you. It aims to help you deliberate about what you should do to predict more reliably the outcomes of interventions you might be considering and to recognise what evidence you will need for these tasks and how judgement is central to doing them well. Our discussion grows out of systematic research and scholarship but this is no scholarly tome. It aims to be of help to real practitioners and managers making real decisions about real children and young people and wanting to think about how to do this better.

 
Understanding The Cost Of Welfare

Understanding the cost of welfare

Policy Press (2017)

Author: Howard Glennerster

The challenge of meeting the growing cost of welfare is one of the most pressing issues facing governments of our time. Howard Glennerster’s authoritative Understanding the cost of welfare assesses what welfare costs and how it is funded sector-by-sector. The book is written in a clear, accessible style, ideally suited to both teaching and study, and the general reader.

 
How People Judge Policing

How People Judge Policing

Oxford University Press (2017)

Authors: P A J Waddington, Martin Wright, Tim Newburn

When people witness occasions when police use their powers to investigate crime and arrest offenders, how do those members of the public assess what they have seen? This book reports research in which a variety of groups from the West Midlands watched short video-clips of such real-life incidents and then discussed their appraisal amongst themselves. What emerges from those discussions is that the practice of policing is deeply controversial.

 

Podcasts and videos
Social Policy Brochure 2017