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Department of Social Policy

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Department of Social Policy
2nd Floor, Old Building
London School of Economics and Political Science
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE

  

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The Department of Social Policy is the longest established in the UK.
The Department prides itself in being able to offer teaching based on the highest quality empirical research in the field. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the UK's nationwide assessment of research quality, impact and environment, which is undertaken every six to seven years, the Department was ranked first in the UK for world leading and internationally excellent research and was also awarded the joint highest marks for the non-academic impacts of its work. When adjusted to take account of the high proportion of staff submitted to REF, it is the number one UK Social Policy Department for overall research quality.
Professor Stephen Jenkins

Professor Stephen Jenkins in Berlin

Professor Stephen Jenkins gave an invited plenary lecture at the 50th Anniversary Conference of the German Institute for Research on the Labour Market and Professions (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung, IAB) in Berlin, 5-6 April 2017.

His topic was "Monitoring poverty in Europe: assessing progress since the early-1990s"

 
Dr Armine Ishkanian

Dr Armine Ishkanian in conversation with CivilNet

Parliamnetary elections were held in Armenia on 2nd April 2017. They were the first parliamentary election of its kind since the siging of a 2015 referendum. Dr Armine Ishkanian talked to CivilNet about the new voting technology, the role of civil society, and the immense mistrust of government in Armenia.

Following the results which saw the ruling Republican Party of Armenia win the largest share of the vote, Armine Ishkanian shares her views on the LSE Blog as to why the result was highly disappointing for civil society groups and democracy activists in the country.

 
Farmer in Vietnam

A matter of life or death

Each year, an estimated 800,000 people around the world take their own lives, making suicide one of the most common causes of death globally.

Valentina Iemmi of the Department of Social Policy analysed the relationship between poverty and suicide in low and middle income countries, and discusses how her work could help inform efforts to address this global health crisis.

 
Statue of Liberty

No Escape from American Exceptionalism? The Future of US Social Policy

This lecture is part of the Global Welfare Futures Lecture Series.

Date: Tuesday 02 May 2017
Time: 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building

Speaker: Professor Paul Pierson
Chair: Dr Timo Fleckenstein

Twitter: #LSEUSpolicy

This event is free and open to all.

 
Nicola Padfield

Public Event: What if we rethought parole?

Date: Tuesday 16th May 2017
Time: 6.30pm-8.30pm
Venue: Alumni Theatre, New Academic Building

Speakers: Nicola Padfield, Professor Nick Hardwick, Dr Laura Jones

Chair: Dr Meredith Rossner

This lecture will discuss the present presumption that a parolee has to demonstrate they are not at risk of repeated offending and suggest that it should be the State to demonstrates the prisoner remains a risk.

This event is free. To attend this event, please register via Eventbrite

 
Lecture Theatre

BSPS Meeting on Menopause, Health and Culture

Organised by LSE and LSHTM

Date: Wednesday 24th May 2017
Time: 9.30am-4.00pm
Venue: Thai Theatre, New Academic Building

Preliminary Programme

This meeting is free but registration is required. Please email Alexis Palfreyman to book your place. 

 

 
The Origins Of Behavioural Public Policy

Book Launch: The Origins of Behavioural Public Policy

Date: Wednesday 31st May 2017
Time: 6.00pm-8.00pm
Venue: Thai Theatre, New Academic Building

The event will launch Dr Adam Oliver’s new book, The Origins of Behavioural Public Policy.

Lord Gus O'Donnell (Frontier Economics), Professor Nick Chater (Warwick Business School) and Professor Patrick Dunleavy (LSE)  will offer views on the future of this field.

To attend this event please RSVP Adam Oliver.

 
Further events are listed in the Department diary.

Past events are listed in News and Events archive.

Recent Podcasts

Literary Festival 2017

LSE Literary Festival 2017

Representing Poverty and Inequality: The legacy of Charles Booth

Recorded on 25 February 2017

Speakers:  Joseph Bullman, Professor Mary Morgan, Sarah Wise 

Chair:  Professor Nicola Lacey

 

Stagnation Generation: Exploring Intergenerational Fairness

Recorded on 22 February 2017

Speakers:  Nona Buckley-Irvine, Georgia Gould, Professor John Hills and Omar Khan 

Chair:  David Willetts

 
Drugs

Drug Policies Beyond the War on Drugs?

Recorded on 15 February 2017

Speakers: Dr John Collins, Professor Lawrence Phillips, Dr Joanne Csete, Dr Michael Shiner

As countries examine new ways of managing drug issues beyond the problematic and simplistic model of the 'war on drugs', this lecture examines how LSE research, among others, can help impact and drive government policies.

 

 
Lecture Theatre

The Relationship between Inequality and Poverty: mechanisms and policy options

Recorded on 8 February 2017

Speakers: Dr Eleni Karagiannaki and Dr Abigail McKnight 

This lecture examines the empirical relationship between economic inequality and poverty across countries and over time, paying attention to different measurement issues. It then considers a range of potential mechanisms driving this relationship and explores policy options.

 
More podcasts available at Events podcasts

External  Videos

BullyingVideo
Bullying Experiences of Disabled Children and Young People in England

Released on : 1 June 2016
Contributor: Professor Lucinda Platt

Research conducted by Stella Chatzitheochari (University of Warwick) in collaboration with Sam Parsons (University College London) and Lucinda Platt (London School of Economics and Political Science) suggests that children and young people with disabilities are more likely to be bullied at school compared to those students with no known disabilities.
 

Recent LSE Videos

This information is generated by an RSS feed from the Department audio and video channel, and shows the 4 most recent videos produced by the LSE.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Alex [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Alex [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Azhar [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
  • What you can do with a Social Policy degree from LSE? - Fleur [Video]
    Contributor(s): Alex Talbot, Azhar S-O-Haj-Mohamed, Layla Doyle, Rhea Dattani | The Department of Social Policy’s undergraduate degree programmes allow students to develop skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers. Our graduates have found work in a variety of industries including; politics and government, education and teaching, banking and finance, NGOs, charities and international development, as well as journalism, media and publishing, advertising marketing and PR, and accounting and auditing.
More videos available on the Social Policy Video Channel
More videos available on the CASE Video Channel
More videos available on the LSE Health and Social Care Video Channel

 

Latest Publications

This information is generated by an RSS feed from LSE Research Online, and shows the 20 most recent publications (either published, or accepted for publication).

Featured Publications
How People Judge Policing

How People Judge Policing

Oxford University Press (2017)

Authors: P A J Waddington, Martin Wright, Tim Newburn

When people witness occasions when police use their powers to investigate crime and arrest offenders, how do those members of the public assess what they have seen? This book reports research in which a variety of groups from the West Midlands watched short video-clips of such real-life incidents and then discussed their appraisal amongst themselves. What emerges from those discussions is that the practice of policing is deeply controversial.

 

 
Italy Homes

Age norms, family relationships and home leaving in Italy

Demographic Research, 2017, 36(9), 281-306

Author: Marco Tosi

Previous research has shown that social norms have an influence on young adults’ life course transitions. However, few studies have explicitly and directly tested the idea that perceived age norms affect the decision to leave the parental home.

Dr Marco Tosi, in his recently published article, asks whether normative factors are correlated with the decision to leave the family nest in Italy, and whether this association depends on a system of perceived costs and benefits, parental approval of their children’s decisions, and the quality of parent-child relationships.

 
Dr Joan Costa-Font

Careful in the Crisis? Determinants of Older People's Informal Care Receipt in Crisis-Struck European Countries

Health Economics, 2016, 25: 25-42

Authors: Joan Costa-Font, Martin Karlsson, Henning Øien

Macroeconomic downturns can have an important impact on the receipt of informal and formal long-term care, because recessions increase the number of unemployed and affect net wealth. This paper investigates how the market for informal care changed during and after the Great Recession in Europe, with particular focus on the determinants of care receipt.

Globesity? The Effects of Globalization on Obesity and Caloric Intake

Food Policy, 2016, 64: 121-132

Authors: Joan Costa-Font, Nuria Mas

This paper examines the effect of globalization, in its economic and social dimensions, on obesity and caloric intake, namely the so –called ‘globesity’ hypothesis. The results suggest a robust association between globalization and both obesity and caloric intake.

Related press article 
The meals your parents made for you are now too calorific for modern lifestyles
The Telegraph, 26th December 2016

 

Podcasts and videos
Social Policy Brochure 2017