Julia Philipp

Julia Philipp

PhD candidate

Department of Social Policy

Languages
English, German
Key Expertise
Gender differences, Labour market, Gender roles

About me

Research topic:

Essays on gender differences in labour market outcomes, career-related choices, and gender roles

Julia is a PhD candidate in the Department of Social Policy and in the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE).  She holds an MSc in Economics and an MSc in Development, both from the LSE. Prior to her PhD, she worked as a consultant at the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, D.C. Alongside her PhD work, Julia has taught microeconomics (EC201) to undergraduate students and applied regression analysis (MY452) to postgraduate students. Her research has been covered by various media outlets including BBC News, the Guardian, Daily Mail, and Telegraph.

Research interests:

  • Gender differences in career-relevant decisions and labour market outcomes
  • Labour and family economics
  • Gender roles, social norms, identity, and culture
  • Intergenerational transmission
  • Poverty and preferences for redistribution  
  • Work-family policies
  • Policy evaluation

Current research projects

“Gender segregation in field of study: the role of intergenerational transmission” (as part of PhD project)

 “Self-Employment of Immigrants: Understanding the Country of Origin Effects” (with Berkay Özcan and Serden Özcan)

 

Peer-reviewed publications

“The ‘mighty girl’ effect: Does parenting daughters alter attitudes towards gender norms?” - with M. Borrell-Porta and J. Costa-Font (Oxford Economic Papers, 2019, Vol. 71, pp. 25-46)

“Crime and erosion of trust – Evidence for Latin America” – with A. Corbacho and M. Ruiz-Vega (World Development, 2015, Vol. 70, pp. 400-415)

 

Supervisors: Dr Joan Costa-Font, Dr Berkay Özcan

Expertise Details

Economic gender gap; female labour market outcomes; gender roles; intergenerational transmission; poverty; preferences for redistribution; policy evaluation; causal inference