MPhil/PhD in Economic History

In addition to progressing with their research, students are expected to take the listed training and transferable skills courses.
Students may take courses in addition to those listed, and should discuss this with their supervisor.

Year One
Training courses
Compulsory (examined)
EH520 Approaches to Economic and Social History
EH401 and EH402 (unless already taken as part of the Master's degree, and, where appropriate, a pre-sessional statistics course)

Optional (not examined)
Supervisors may require students in their first or subsequent years of study to take other relevant economic history courses, methodological courses provided by the Methodology Institute or the Institute of Historical Research or skills training courses as required for their thesis topic.

Transferable skills courses
Compulsory (not examined)
EH590 Thesis Workshop in Economic History

Optional (not examined)
MY593A Authoring a PhD and Developing as a Researcher: Getting Started

Year Two
Training courses
Compulsory (not examined)
EH590 Thesis Workshop in Economic History

Transferable skills courses
Optional (not examined)
MY593B Authoring a PhD and Developing as a Researcher: The Middle Years

Year Three
Training courses
Compulsory (not examined)
EH590 Thesis Workshop in Economic History

Transferable skills courses
Optional (not examined)
MY593C Authoring a PhD and Developing as a Researcher: The Endgame

Year four
Training courses
Compulsory (not examined)
EH590 Thesis Workshop in Economic History

Progression and upgrade requirements
By the start of the Summer Term students are required to submit at least one draft thesis chapter and a 3-5 page thesis outline to the department's Graduate Review Committee. Students taking one or more MSc examination may, with the support of their supervisor, apply to defer their submission of work to no later than the start of the 7th week of the Summer Term. The Committee will interview all students during the Summer Term, and re-registration for a second year will be conditional on the work presented being of a satisfactory standard.  All students are expected to gain broad knowledge of the subject from graduate level course work in their first year and active participation in workshops, seminars and conferences to complement the expertise gained from intense thesis research.

By the Summer Term of the second year the Graduate Review Committee will normally expect to see about half the thesis in draft. The Committee will interview students, and if the submitted work is of an acceptable standard, students will be upgraded from MPhil to PhD. Students may defer the upgrade decision until their third year for fieldwork or other reasons, but only with the support of their supervisor.