Jillions, Andrew

Dr Andrew Jillions  

Department

Position held

Fellow in International Relations Theory

 

Experience keywords:

Counter-terrorism; Global Constitutionalism; Human Rights; International Intervention; International Political Theory; Politics of International Law; Transitional Justice

Research summary > [Click to expand]

I work primarily on the politics of international law and global constitutionalism, focused on the "hard cases" of intervention, torture, peacebuilding and the governance of the global commons. Tying these areas together is an interest in how uncertainty changes and challenges the practice of responsibility. My general approach to this is informed by the republican tradition (particularly the Augustinian variety) and the English School. I have two projects in development. The first explores diplomacy and the ethics of non-intervention, focusing on Syria. The second looks at how the structural features of the 'global commons' impact on the governance of terrorism, piracy, smuggling and cybercrime - and what this means for the future of global crime and punishment.

Sectors and industries to which research relates:

Law; Policy and Regulatory Bodies

Countries and regions to which research relates:

Syria; UK; US

Contact Points

LSE phone number:

020 7955 6237

Publications

2015

Jillions, Andrew (2015) When a gamekeeper turns poacher: torture, diplomatic assurances and the politics of trust International Affairs, 91 (3). 489-504. ISSN 0020-5850

Friedman, Rebekka and Jillions, Andrew (2015) The pitfalls and politics of holistic justice Global Policy Journal, 6 (2). 141-150. ISSN 1758-5880

2012

Jillions, Andrew (2012) Commanding the commons: constitutional enforcement and the law of the sea Global Constitutionalism, 1 (03). 429-454. ISSN 2045-3817

Expert Image

LSE Research Online|

Collection of LSE research outputs

LSE Consulting|

Service providing unique access
to LSE's expertise

Create or update your
online profile
|

[access restricted to staff]

Research highlights|

Short articles about LSE research