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Barbara Fasolo

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About the author and department

Personal webpage:

http://www.lse.ac.uk/management/people/bfasolo.aspx

Management Department:

http://www.lse.ac.uk/management/home.aspx

 

Relevant research

Fasolo, Barbara and Bana-Costa, Carlos (2014) Tailoring value elicitation to decision makers' numeracy and fluency: expressing value judgments in numbers or words. Omega: the International Journal of Management Science, 44 . pp. 83-90. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/51692/

Beyer, AR, Fasolo, B., Phillips, LD, de Graeff, PA, Hillege HL, (2013). Risk Perception of Prescription Drugs: Results of a Survey Among Experts in the European Regulatory Network. Medical Decision Making, 33(4). pp. 579-92. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/50290/

Phillips, L.D., Fasolo, Barbara, Zafiropoulous, N., Eichler, H.-G., Ehmann, F., Jekerle, V., Kramarz, P., Nicoll, A. and Lonngren, T.(2013) Modelling the risk-benefit impact of H1N1 influenza vaccines. The European Journal of Public Health, 23 (4). pp. 674-678. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/51454/  

Reutskaja, Elena and Fasolo, Barbara (2013) It's not necessarily best to be first. Harvard Business Review, 91 (1 - 2). p. 3.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/47921/

Phillips, Lawrence D., Fasolo, Barbara, Zafiropoulos, Nikolaos and Beyer, Andrea (2011) Is quantitative benefit–risk modelling of drugs desirable or possible? Drug Discovery Today: Technologies, 8 (1). e3-e10.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/39733/

Fasolo, Barbara, Reutskaja, Elena, Dixon, Anna and Boyce, Tammy (2010) Helping patients choose: how to improve the design of comparative scorecards of hospital quality. Patient Education and Counselling, 78 (3). pp. 344-349.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32720/

von Winterfeldt, Detlof and Fasolo, Barbara (2009) Structuring decision problems: a case study and reflections for practitioners.European Journal of Operational Research, 199 (3). pp. 857-866.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32724/

Morton, Alec and Fasolo, Barbara (2009) Behavioural decision theory for multi-criteria decision analysis: a guided tour. Journal of the Operational Research Society, 60 . pp. 268-275.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/25014/ 

Fasolo, Barbara, Carmeci, Floriana A. and Misuraca, Raffaella (2009) The effect of choice complexity on perception of time spent choosing: when choice takes longer but feels shorter. Psychology and Marketing, 26 (3). pp. 213-228.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32727/

Fasolo, Barbara, Hertwig, Ralph, Huber, Michael and Ludwig, Mark (2009) Size, entropy, and density: what is the difference that makes the difference between small and large real-world assortments? Psychology and Marketing, 26 (3). pp. 254-279.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32731/

Lenton, A. P., Fasolo, Barbara and Todd, P. M. (2009) The relationship between number of potential mates and mating skew in humans. Animal Behaviour, 77 (1). pp. 55-60.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32733/

Lenton, A. P., Fasolo, Barbara and Todd, P. M. (2008) "Shopping" for a mate: expected versus experienced preferences in online mate choice. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 51 (2). pp. 169-182.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/19556/

Fasolo, Barbara, McClelland, Gary H. and Todd, P. M. (2007) Escaping the tyranny of choice: When fewer attributes make choice easier. Marketing Theory, 7 (1). pp. 13-26.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/16208/

Todd, P. M., Penke, Lars, Fasolo, Barbara and Lenton, A. P. (2007) Different cognitive processes underlie human mate choices and mate preferences. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104 (38). pp. 15011-15016.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/14711/

Fasolo, Barbara, Misuraca, Raffaella, McClelland, Gary H. and Cardaci, Maurizio (2006) Animation attracts: The attraction effect in an on-line shopping environment. Psychology and Marketing, 23 (10). pp. 799-811. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/14854/

Katsikopoulos, K. V. and Fasolo, Barbara (2006) New tools for decision analysts. IEEE Systems Man and Cybernetics. Part A: Systems and Humans, 36 (5). pp. 960-967. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/16202/

Gigerenzer, Gerd, Hertwig, Ralph, van den Broek, Eva, Fasolo, Barbara and Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos V. (2005) A 30% chance of rain tomorrow: how does the public understand probabilistic weather forecasts? Risk Analysis, 25 (3). pp. 623-629.  http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/16975/

Evidence of impact

Reference to their work on Hospital Choice Architecture

Boyce, Tammy, Dixon, Anna, Fasolo, Barbara and Reutskaja, Elena (2010) Choosing a high-quality hospital: the role of nudges, scorecard design and information. The King's Fund, London, UK. http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/30030/

Summary, full report and appendices available at:
http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/choosing-high-quality-hospital

King’s Fund submission to Nuffield Trust ratings review, available at:
http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/briefings-and-responses/consultation-response-nuffield-trust-health-and-social-care-ratings-review

King’s Fund submission to the Co-operation Competition Panel on choice and Any Willing Provider, available at:
http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/briefings-and-responses/co-operation-competition-panel-any-willing-provider

King’s Fund submission to the Department of Health on greater Choice and Control, available at:
http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/briefings-and-responses/liberating-nhs-greater-choice-and-control

Testimonial

Email from Bob Gann, DH/ NHS Choices, March 2013:

‘I am pleased to confirm that the research carried out for Choosing a High Quality Hospital was very influential in our design work for NHS Choices find and compare services section. Back in 2010 this area of NHS Choices presented an often confusing set of variables without a consistent visual language. If you look at the site today many of the recommendations of the Kings Fund research have been taken on board with choice factors which are most important to patients displayed more prominently and "compare the market" style icons used consistently and clearly.’ 

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