Marczak, Joanna

Dr Joanna Marczak  


Position held

Research Officer


Non LSE positions held

Polish-fluent Coordinator of International Long-Term Care Network, LSE (


Experience keywords:

Gender equality; Polish migration; care workforce and migration; child bearing; comparative social policy; cross-national comparisons of social policies in Europe; family; gender equality; informal and formal care, comparative social policies in Europe; informal and formal care; informal care; long-term care, prevention in social care; long-term care; low fertility in Europe; low fertility; migration in the EU; migration within the EU; prevention in social care; social policies in Europe; wellbeing; work-family balance

Research summary > [Click to expand]

Joanna’s research interests focus on a broad range of social policy related issues, including long-term care and prevention, fertility, migration, gender and labour markets, poverty and family. Her PhD at LSE’s Social Policy department examined childbearing intentions of Polish mothers and fathers living in Poland and in the UK. Joanna has been working with Dr Jose-Luis Fernandez on a number of projects including evaluating prevention effects in adult social care (ASC) and testing new eligibility criteria for ASC in England. She is also a coordinator of the International Long-term Care Policy Network (ILPN) which promotes the global exchange of evidence and knowledge on long-term care policy among researchers, policy-makers and other stakeholders.

Sectors and industries to which research relates:

Consultancy; Healthcare

Countries and regions to which research relates:

Europe; Poland; UK


Polish [Spoken: Fluent, Written: Fluent]

Contact Points

LSE phone number:

0207 106 1421



Marczak, Joanna and Sigle, Wendy and Coast, Ernestina (2018) When the grass is greener: fertility decisions in a cross national context Population Studies. ISSN 0032-4728


Marczak, Joanna (2017) The Care Act 2014 in England Zdrowie Publiczne i Zarzadzanie, 15 (3). 232-241. ISSN 1731-7398

Marczak, Joanna and Fernández, José-Luis and Wittenberg, Raphael (2017) Quality and cost-effectivness in long-term care and dependency prevention: the English policy landscape CEQUA report, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Marczak, Joanna (2017) Kin support and childbearing intentions: Polish mothers and fathers in Poland and in the UK. In: Evolutionary Demography Seminar Series, 26 June 2017, London, UK


Marczak, Joanna and Sigle-Rushton, Wendy and Coast, Ernestina (2016) Cross-national comparisons: a missing link in the relationship between policies and fertility? A comparative study of fertility decision making of Polish nationals in Poland and UK. In: European Population Conference, 31 August - 3 September 2016, Mainz, Germany

Marczak, Joanna (2016) Kin support and childbearing intentions. In: British Society for Population Studies (BSPS) Conference, 13 October 2016, Winchester, UK


Marczak, Joanna and Wistow, Gerald (2015) Commissioning long–term care services In: Gori, Cristiano and Fernández, José-Luis and Wittenberg, Raphael, (eds.) Long-term care reforms in OECD countries : successes and failures. Policy Press, Bristol, UK. ISBN 9781447305057

Fernandez, Jose-Luis and Snell, Tom and Marczak, Joanna (2015) An assessment of the impact of the Care Act 2014 eligibility regulations PSSRU discussion paper, Personal Social Services Research Unit, London, UK.


Fernández, José-Luis and Snell, Tom and Marczak, Joanna (2014) Evaluation of the June 2014 draft national minimum eligibility criteria for social care PSSRU discussion paper, Personal Social Services Research Unit, London, UK.


Marczak, Joanna (2011) Socioeconomic characteristics of Polish migrants in the UK by parity and gender. In: Mobility and Migrations at the Time of Transformation - Methodological Challenges, 25 March 2011, Warsaw, Poland

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