Downes, David


Professor Emeritus David Downes  

Department

Position held

Mannheim Centre for the Study of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Department of Social Policy

Professor Emeritus of Social Administration

Experience keywords:

comparative sentencing and penal policy; theories of crime and delinquency; crime and the labour market

Research summary > [Click to expand]

I am working with Tim Newburn and Paul Rock on the official history of criminal justice in England 1959-1997.

Languages:

French [Spoken: Basic, Written: Basic]

Media experience:

RadioTV

Contact Points

LSE phone number:

+44 (0)20 7955 6445

Publications

LSE Research Online, Funnelback Search

2011

Downes, David (2011) Against penal inflation: comment on Nicola Lacey's The prisoners' dilemma Punishment and Society, 13 (1). 114-120. ISSN 1462-4745

Downes, David (2011) Review symposium on Nicola Lacey, the prisoners’ dilemma: political economy and punishment in contemporary democracies: against penal inflation comment on Nicola Lacey’s the prisoners’ dilemma Punishment and Society, 13 (1). 114-120. ISSN 1741-3095

2010

Downes, David (2010) Counterblast: what went right? New Labour and crime control The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 49 (4). 394-397. ISSN 0265-5527

Downes, David (2010) Comments on Mathiesen’s ‘Ten reasons for not building more prisons’ In: McCarthy, Melissa, (ed.) Incarceration and Human Rights IMAge of Book Cover for Incarceration and Human Rights: the Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2007. Oxford Amnesty Lectures. Manchester University Press, Manchester, UK. ISBN 9780719081804

Downes, David and Hobbs, Richard and Newburn, Tim, eds (2010) The eternal recurrence of crime and control: essays in honour of Paul Rock Clarendon studies in criminology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. ISBN 9780199580231

2007

Downes, David and Rock, Paul and Chinkin, Christine and Gearty, Conor, eds (2007) Crime, social control and human rights: from moral panics to states of denial Willan Publishing, Cullompton, UK. ISBN 9781843922285

2006

Downes, David and Hansen, Kirstine (2006) Welfare and punishment in comparative perspective In: Armstrong, Sarah and McAra, Lesley, (eds.) Perspectives on Punishment: the Contours of Control. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 133-154. ISBN 0199278768

Downes, David and Morgan, Rod (2006) No turning back: the politics of law and order into the millennium In: Maguire, Mike and Morgan, Rod and Reiner, Robert, (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 201-240. ISBN 9780199205431

2004

Downes, David (2004) New Labour and the lost causes of crime Criminal Justice Matters, 55 (Spring). 4-5. ISSN 1934-6220

2003

Downes, David and Rock, Paul (2003) Understanding Deviance Oxford University Press, Oxford. ISBN 0199249377

2002

Downes, David and Morgan, Rod (2002) No turning back: the politics of law and order into the millennium In: Maguire, Mike and Morgan, Rod and Reiner, Robert, (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 201-240. ISBN 9780199249374

2001

Downes, David (2001) The "macho" penal economy: mass incarceration in the United States - a European perspective Punishment and Society, 3 (1). 61-80. ISSN 1462-4745

Downes, David (2001) The macho penal economy: mass incarceration in the U.S. - a European perspective In: Garland, David, (ed.) Mass Imprisonment: Social Causes and Consequences. Sage Publications, London, 51-69. ISBN 9780761973249

Downes, David (2001) Four years hard: New Labour and crime control Criminal Justice Matters, 46 (1). 8-9. ISSN 0962-7251

1999

Downes, David (1999) Crime and deviance In: Taylor, Steve, (ed.) Sociology: Issues and Debates. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 231-252. ISBN 9780312234997


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