Gennaioli, Caterina

Dr Caterina Gennaioli  

Department

Position held

Experience keywords:

applied microeconometrics; corruption; development economics; environmental economics; political economy

Research summary > [Click to expand]

I work on topics at the intersection of political economy, development and environmental economics. In particular I am interested in studying the role played by local (formal and informal) institutions, in influencing environmental outcomes and shaping the implementation and effectiveness of environmental policy.

Countries and regions to which research relates:

Brazil; Ethiopia; India; Indonesia; Italy

Contact Points

LSE phone number:

+44 (0)7563 494223

Publications

2016

Gennaioli, Caterina and Tavoni, Massimo (2016) Clean or dirty energy: evidence of corruption in the renewable energy sector Public Choice, 166 (3). 1-30. ISSN 0048-5829

Fankhauser, Samuel and Gennaioli, Caterina and Collins, Murray (2016) Do international factors influence the passage of climate change legislation? Climate Policy. ISSN 1752-7457

2015

Doda, Baran and Gennaioli, Caterina and Gouldson, Andy and Grover, David and Sullivan, Rory (2015) Are corporate carbon management practices reducing corporate carbon emissions? Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 23 (5). 257-270. ISSN 1535-3966

Fankhauser, Sam and Gennaioli, Caterina and Collins, Murray (2015) The political economy of passing climate change legislation: evidence from a survey Global Environmental Change, 35. 52-61. ISSN 0959-3780

2013

Gennaioli, Caterina and Martin, Ralf and Muuls, Mirabelle (2013) Using micro data to examine causal effects of climate policy In: Fouquet, Roger, (ed.) Handbook on Energy and Climate Change. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Cheltenham, 453-470. ISBN 9780857933683

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