Sigma Club

Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events › Sigma Club

Events List Navigation

May 2017

Casey D. McCoy (Edinburgh): “Interpretive Analogies Between Statistical and Quantum Mechanics”

8 May, 5:15 pm6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, Lakatos Building
London, WC2A 2AE United Kingdom
+ Google Map

Philosophers have on occasion noticed various analogies between interpretive approaches to statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics. Probably the most often noted analogy is between the Boltzmannian approach to statistical mechanics and the de Broglie-Bohm approach to quantum mechanics. The possible and pertinent analogies do not end there however. The purpose of this talk is to draw them out in order to see what is suggested about the two theories' interpretation. The main lessons I draw are as follows. First, I claim that there is at least one interpretation available in statistical mechanics which has been so far overlooked and has a natural analogy in the Everettian interpretation of quantum mechanics. Second, I show that to a certain extent the interpretive choices in both theories depend importantly in how stochasticity is interpreted, a point which has not been seriously raised in the literature. Finally, I suggest that pursuing these analogies suggests the possibility of a kind of “measurement problem” in statistical mechanics.

Find out more »

Eleanor Knox (KCL): “Spacetime Functionalism and Non-Commutative Geometry”

22 May, 5:15 pm6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, Lakatos Building
London, WC2A 2AE United Kingdom
+ Google Map

Abstract: TBC Dr Eleanor Knox is a Lecturer in Philosophy at King's College London.   #SigmaClub

Find out more »
June 2017

Michael Stoeltzner (U South Carolina): “Model Choice and Crucial Tests. On the Empirical Epistemology of the Higgs Discovery.”

5 June, 5:15 pm6:45 pm
LAK 2.06, Lakatos Building
London, WC2A 2AE United Kingdom
+ Google Map

To quite a few observers outside the field of elementary particle physics, the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 appeared to be just the final step in a long series of discoveries and precision tests in which stronger and stronger accelerator experiments had confirmed all particles of the Standard Model (SM) and scrutinized their interactions. The present paper argues that this picture needs qualifications. They provide two important lessons for the role of crucial experiments in a theory-laden context and the operation of epistemic and pragmatic criteria of theory (or model) choice.

Find out more »
+ Export Events